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Hymes presentation

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  • 1. Planning, Marketing and Assessing The Digital Humanities Center Presentation by Jenna Hymes Syracuse University
  • 2. The Assignment
    • IST613: Library Planning, Marketing and Assessment
    • Semester-long assignment: find a librarian planning a project
    • Create a Literature Review, Project Plan, Marketing Plan, and Assessment Plan for this project
  • 3. PLANNING THE DHC
  • 4. What Can We Learn About Planning from Others?
    • There are some planning steps that frequently appear in the literature:
      • Seeking input from potential users to gain understanding of their needs
      • Creating planning committees made up of people from various areas of the library and university
      • Visiting established centers at other universities
      • Defining the goals and vision for the center
  • 5. Defining Digital Humanities Centers
    • According to Diane Zorich's “A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States” (2008):
    • “ A digital humanities center is an entity where new media and technologies are used for humanities-based research, teaching, and intellectual engagement and experimentation. The goals of the center are to further humanities scholarship, create new forms of knowledge, and explore technology’s impact on humanities-based disciplines” (p. 7) .
  • 6. Positioning Statement
    • The Digital Humanities Center:
    • provides information and technology services and support for Humanities and History students and faculty, as well as for the entire university community
    • is a “one stop shop” for digital projects of all levels – from simple citation management or Photoshop work to in-depth OCR, film editing, and scanning projects
    • offers the services of technology and subject specialist librarians
  • 7. DHC Users and Stakeholders
    • Graduate and undergraduate Humanities and History students (plus students from other departments)
    • Humanities and History professors (plus professors from other departments)
    • University librarians
    • University administration
    • Graduate student DHC employees
    • Visiting scholars
  • 8. User Needs
    • The DHC staff has the opportunity to encourage new and different types of technology usage, including encouraging use of technology in coursework and creating the possibility for large-scale academic projects and collaborations using digital technologies
  • 9. Goal for the Digital Humanities Center
    • To create a space that provides technology, information specialists, and technology specialists all in one place for the benefit of Humanities and History students and faculty.
  • 10. Outcomes for the DHC
    • Outcome #1: After visiting the DHC, 85% of users will be able to operate and implement one or more program/pieces of equipment that they were unfamiliar with prior to their visit
    • Outcome #2: 75% of users will use technology they have learned in the DHC in their future research
    • Outcome #3: 100% of users who wish to will be able to implement larger technology based projects after visiting the DHC
  • 11. MARKETING THE DHC
  • 12. Goal for Marketing the DHC
    • A combination of online, paper, and in-person marketing tools will raise awareness of the Digital Humanities Center while also increasing usage of center services, including increased visits to the center by students and faculty, as well as an increase in large-scale digitally based academic projects in the Humanities and History.
  • 13. Outcomes for Marketing the DHC
    • Outcome #1: 70% of undergraduate and graduate students in the Humanities and History will have used at least one service or technology in the DHC for any type of project six months after the opening of the Center.
    • Outcome #2: 100 students, faculty members, and library staff from across the campus will attend an open house to celebrate the opening of the new DHC.
    • Outcome #3: Usage of the DHC website will increase by 25% after the opening of the Center.
    • Outcome #4: 75% of Humanities and History classes will host a presentation by the DHC librarian by one year after the opening of the Center.
  • 14. Marketing Tools
    • Posters
    • Brochures
    • Open House
    • New/Updated Website
    • Facebook Page
    • Class Presentations
    • Promotion of Projects Created in the DHC
  • 15.
    • Marketing of the DHC is key both within the university and out to the larger scholarly community
    • Zorich (2008) states that centers may also gain recognition by creating and sharing open source products and tools
  • 16. The Importance of Scholarship
    • The profile of the Center for Digital Research at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was raised by the scholarship that researchers generated with its resources:
    • “ the quality of their work demanded (and got) attention, from outside funding agencies, the wider scholarly community, and even university administrators” (Edwards, 2005, para. 14).
  • 17. Marketing Timeline
  • 18. Task Start Date End Date Creation/Distribution of posters to notify community of future DHC during construction January 2012 September 2012 Creation/distribution of posters to notify community of DHC opening August 2012 September 2012 Creation and Distribution of DHC brochures May 2012 Ongoing Creation of new DHC website July 2012 September 2012 Launch new website September 2012 September 2012 Create and maintain facebook page August 2012 Ongoing DHC Open House September 2012 September 2012 Class Presentations September 2012 Ongoing Tracking of new projects created in the DHC September 2012 Ongoing
  • 19. ASSESSING THE DHC
  • 20. Remembering the Outcomes
    • Outcome #1: After visiting the DHC, 85% of users will be able to operate and implement one or more program/pieces of equipment that they were unfamiliar with prior to their visit
    • Outcome #2: 75% of users will use technology they have learned in the DHC in their future research
    • Outcome #3: 100% of users who wish to will be able to implement larger technology based projects after visiting the DHC
  • 21. Assessing Outcome #1
    • Pop up surveys on DHC computers to collect info on what the user came to the DHC for originally, what he or she learned while in the DHC, if this was the user's first use of the program/piece of equipment he or she used, and if the user was helped by a DHC employee
    • Data could be analyzed using tools available through online survey software (Zoomerang, Survey Monkey, etc.)
  • 22. Assessing Outcome #1
    • Alternative method: Interviews (either one on one or in groups) of users
    • If the outcome is not met, the DHC librarian will work to increase awareness of DHC programs/equipment and insure that each user interaction is a teaching moment
  • 23. Assessing Outcome #2
    • Pop up surveys on DHC computers (could be coupled with surveys for Outcome #1) with questions focusing on users' future use of technology and which types of technology they plan to use in the future
    • Data could be analyzed through online tools, plus gathering of answers to open-ended questions
  • 24. Assessing Outcome #2
    • Alternative method: examining papers produced by users of the DHC – may need to be coupled with interviews
    • If less than desired percentage indicate they will use DHC tools in the future, will need to examine types of technology/programs offered in DHC, may also seek input from users to understand what types of equipment or software might be useful to them
  • 25. Assessing Outcome #3
    • Measured by examining documents and projects produced by users of the DHC, plus inquiring about the methodology of the creators of projects to create connections between DHC services and academic projects
    • Outcome will be met when those who seek help with large-scale projects will be able to pursue and bring these projects to fruition
  • 26. Assessing Outcome #3
    • If large-scale projects are not being implemented in the DHC, DHC could reach out to departments or professors to offer their services or to inquire into projects that may benefit from the services offered by the DHC
  • 27. Assessment Timeline
  • 28. Date Task September 2012 - DHC Opens - Begin user online surveys - Begin observation and inquiries to discover large-scale projects developing in DHC October 2012 - User surveys end - Analyze survey data - Long-term project identified in DHC – support users' technology/research needs November 2012 - Report survey results to DHC staff December 2012-March 2013 - Implement necessary changes based on results of survey March 2013 - Begin user surveys again April 2013 - User surveys end - Analyze survey data - Completion of large-scale project – analysis of project and creator's use of DHC May 2013 - Report survey results to DHC Staff - Report of DHC role in large-scale project - Presentation of large-scale project June 2013- August 2013 - Plan/implement changes based on survey results - Repeat survey cycle beginning in September 2013
  • 29. Thank you!
  • 30. References
    • Edwards, R. (2005). Creating the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Retrieved from http://cdrh.unl.edu/articles/creatingcdrh.php
    • Zorich, D. (2008). A survey of digital humanities centers in the United States. Princeton, NJ: Council on Library and Information Resources.