Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Balancing Your Family's Media Diet
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Balancing Your Family's Media Diet

1,231
views

Published on

A brief presentation for my local elementary school on making smart media choices for families.

A brief presentation for my local elementary school on making smart media choices for families.


0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,231
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Goal of talk is to combat a number of myths and assumptions that parents might have heard; give some practical & non-judgmental recommendations for ways to make media a healthy part of your family life.
  • TV: hypercommercial, mind-numbing, low quality. Use as DVD player as somehow superior.
    Films: little psychological research aside from marketing; as commercial as TV
    Books: quality is just as variable, physical passivity the same
  • TV: hypercommercial, mind-numbing, low quality. Use as DVD player as somehow superior.
    Films: little psychological research aside from marketing; as commercial as TV
    Books: quality is just as variable, physical passivity the same
  • TV: hypercommercial, mind-numbing, low quality. Use as DVD player as somehow superior.
    Films: little psychological research aside from marketing; as commercial as TV
    Books: quality is just as variable, physical passivity the same
  • Many anti-TV advocates imagine that television turns kids into passive zombies, absorbing messages like a sponge.
    Kids can be taught how to view actively, and many programs demand such active viewing - early shows like Blue’s Clues and Dora the Explorer are designed to promote active engagement.
  • Many anti-TV advocates imagine that television turns kids into passive zombies, absorbing messages like a sponge.
    Kids can be taught how to view actively, and many programs demand such active viewing - early shows like Blue’s Clues and Dora the Explorer are designed to promote active engagement.
  • Many anti-TV advocates imagine that television turns kids into passive zombies, absorbing messages like a sponge.
    Kids can be taught how to view actively, and many programs demand such active viewing - early shows like Blue’s Clues and Dora the Explorer are designed to promote active engagement.
  • Media effects model seems persuasive if you read press accounts of studies; actual research is much more limited and circumspect. Similar links to obesity, learning disabilities are weak.
    Actual research suggests that media is a relatively minor cause of violence compared to other factors (poverty, family violence, access to guns, diet)
  • Media effects model seems persuasive if you read press accounts of studies; actual research is much more limited and circumspect. Similar links to obesity, learning disabilities are weak.
    Actual research suggests that media is a relatively minor cause of violence compared to other factors (poverty, family violence, access to guns, diet)
  • Media effects model seems persuasive if you read press accounts of studies; actual research is much more limited and circumspect. Similar links to obesity, learning disabilities are weak.
    Actual research suggests that media is a relatively minor cause of violence compared to other factors (poverty, family violence, access to guns, diet)
  • Vermont has a high number of TV abstainers who are vocal in their judgmental condemnation. VPR anecdote. Treat TV as a public health crisis.
    TV-free might be right for your family, but it’s not for most. It fails to teach kids how to engage with media thoughtfully & critically.
    More on other strategies later.
  • Vermont has a high number of TV abstainers who are vocal in their judgmental condemnation. VPR anecdote. Treat TV as a public health crisis.
    TV-free might be right for your family, but it’s not for most. It fails to teach kids how to engage with media thoughtfully & critically.
    More on other strategies later.
  • Vermont has a high number of TV abstainers who are vocal in their judgmental condemnation. VPR anecdote. Treat TV as a public health crisis.
    TV-free might be right for your family, but it’s not for most. It fails to teach kids how to engage with media thoughtfully & critically.
    More on other strategies later.
  • Am Society of Pediatrics released this advice a few years ago, but it was based on very limited research from anti-TV advocates, not actual medical data.
    I believe that any “absolutes” like this create more harm than good - guilt and anxiety for parents are more dangerous than moderate & age-appropriate viewing by toddlers.
  • Am Society of Pediatrics released this advice a few years ago, but it was based on very limited research from anti-TV advocates, not actual medical data.
    I believe that any “absolutes” like this create more harm than good - guilt and anxiety for parents are more dangerous than moderate & age-appropriate viewing by toddlers.
  • Am Society of Pediatrics released this advice a few years ago, but it was based on very limited research from anti-TV advocates, not actual medical data.
    I believe that any “absolutes” like this create more harm than good - guilt and anxiety for parents are more dangerous than moderate & age-appropriate viewing by toddlers.
  • The flip-side of guilt & anxiety is apathy - I grew up with few TV limits, and I turned out fine. But just because media is not a public health crisis doesn’t mean that it doesn’t matter. We should engage with our kids and media, making choices that work for your family.
  • The flip-side of guilt & anxiety is apathy - I grew up with few TV limits, and I turned out fine. But just because media is not a public health crisis doesn’t mean that it doesn’t matter. We should engage with our kids and media, making choices that work for your family.
  • The flip-side of guilt & anxiety is apathy - I grew up with few TV limits, and I turned out fine. But just because media is not a public health crisis doesn’t mean that it doesn’t matter. We should engage with our kids and media, making choices that work for your family.
  • Television should not be background noise - it inspires a disengaged passive viewership, exposes kids to age inappropriate content. Choose when to have the television on, and decide who should be viewing.
  • By keeping TV out in the open, you’ll inspire more openness about what everyone is watching and create opportunities for conversations. TV in bedrooms typically create power struggles, secrecy, and uncritical consumption.
  • While you can’t always do it, the more you’re aware of what they’re watching, the more you can promote positive choices & prompt conversation.
    You’ll discover how they watch, what they like, and help them become more critical and attentive viewers. Listen to their opinions & interpretations - it will help you understand how they consume media and why.
    Create an atmosphere of lifelong media literacy
  • I’m a fierce advocate of the DVR as a parenting tool - we’ve had TiVo since becoming parents, and it transforms how kids treat TV. Provides a menu of programs that we’ve decided are appropriate, allowing choice within limits, not dependent on schedule. FF or use mute button during ads. Teach kids how to use system and they’ll develop healthy habits.
  • Media should not be an all-you-can-eat buffet - parents should set clear guidelines for what, when, and how long kids can watch. Strategic scheduling - while you’re making dinner, doing projects with other kids.
  • There is no single rule or policy that fits for every child - make your media parenting fit your kids and their specific needs
  • In the scheme of things, media use is much less of a “hazard” than a lot of people make it out to be. It matters, and you should make wise choices, but there are many more vital things to focus on for your children’s safety and education. The stress and anxiety that many parents feel about media outweighs any potential dangers that might come from watching a little TV.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Balancing Your Family's Media Diet: Approaching Television and Other Media Jason Mittell Professor of Media Studies at Middlebury College Parent of three
    • 2. Myth: Television is worse than other media
    • 3. Myth: Television is worse than other media Reality: Every medium has its own strengths, limitations, biases, and possibilities
    • 4. Myth: Watching television is passive
    • 5. Myth: Watching television is passive Reality: All media can be consumed actively and critically
    • 6. Myth: Violent media will make your kid violent
    • 7. Myth: Violent media will make your kid violent Reality: Some media have limited effects on some viewers in some circumstances
    • 8. Myth: Unplugging the TV is the only answer
    • 9. Myth: Unplugging the TV is the only answer Reality: Abstinence-only is an unsuccessful strategy
    • 10. Myth: Children under 2 should never watch TV
    • 11. Myth: Children under 2 should never watch TV Reality: Kids of any age should watch age-appropriate programming in moderation
    • 12. Myth: It’s just TV - I shouldn’t worry about it
    • 13. Myth: It’s just TV - I shouldn’t worry about it Reality: Don’t worry, but think about it - be part of your kids’ media practices
    • 14. Make “off” the default
    • 15. Television belongs in family common rooms
    • 16. Watch with your kids & talk about what you saw
    • 17. Use technology to take control of media choices
    • 18. Set-up a media diet of age- appropriate options, schedule, guidelines and limits
    • 19. Every kid is different
    • 20. Pick your battles and reject parental guilt!
    • 21. Resources for Parents & Teachers • Common Sense Media: http://www.commonsensemedia.org • Media Awareness Network: http://www.media-awareness.ca • National Association for Media Literacy Education: http://namle.net