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Online research and citing sources for speeches

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  • 1. Online Research and CitingSources for Speeches
  • 2. Internet Research Internet research is an easy way to obtain information about your topic. However, not everything online is college-level quality Evaluating the quality of a website involves looking at:  Credibility  Objectivity  Currency
  • 3. Criteria for Internet Research Credibility  Can you establish who wrote the article? Do they have the necessary credentials? Objectivity  Is the author presenting an objective point of view or a biased opinion? Currency  Is this information current? For some topics like technology, the environment, and medical advances, you should use only the most current information.
  • 4. Determining Website Credibility  We’ll look at six websites  Try to determine if they meet the criteria for internet research or not.  What principle of internet research might they violate?  Note: these websites may contain copyrighted material and are used only for educational purposes
  • 5. Wikipedia
  • 6. Verdict: Not Credible Why not?  Wikipedia is a great source of general information for personal use. However, for college level research, you should use primary resources where you can check the validity and credibility of the information directly.
  • 7. Blogspot
  • 8. Verdict: Not Objective Why not?  Blogs can be created by anyone who wants one. Just because someone writes something doesn’t mean they are qualified to do so or that they are presenting a balanced view.  Most people use blogs to share their personal views.  Most blogs are not research based or peer reviewed.
  • 9. About.com
  • 10. Verdict: Not current Why not?  There is NO DATE on this website, so it’s impossible to tell how current the information is. When it comes to a scientific topic, it’s best to find the most current information possible, as the information is constantly evolving.  It’s a good rule of thumb that if you can’t find an author or date, don’t use the website.
  • 11. Journal Article
  • 12. Verdict: Credible Journal Articles are usually upfront about who wrote them and the credentials of that person. Most journals note up front as well whether or not they are peer-reviewed and scholarly. If you can find all the information about the author and date, there’s a good chance it’s a credible source of information.
  • 13. Social Science Research Network
  • 14. Verdict: Objective Empirical studies tend to be objective and contain vast amounts of information Anything contained on a Research Network as well will probably be peer-reviewed and deemed scholarly as well.
  • 15. SpringerLink
  • 16. Verdict: Current The date is clearly stated on this document. As I created this PowerPoint activity during 2012, one can safely assume a 2012 document is a current source of information for Global Warming. Other information on this website would also indicate that this is a scholarly source of information.
  • 17. Works Cited A list of sources used in a presentation Use a uniform style  APA  MLA Designed to enable someone else to locate the supporting material you used
  • 18. Citing Sources of InformationCorrectly Works Cited Entry Internal References Verbal Citations (your book calls them “Oral citations”)
  • 19. Which citation is which? Harter, L. A. (2008). Human  Internal Communication (3rd ed.). McGraw-Hill Publications. references “According to James Darnell, a researcher for the Institute of  Works Cited Higher Learning…” Entry At the same time, their levels of absenteeism declined  Verbal (Oral) (Oyserman, Beebe, & Terry, Citations 2006)
  • 20. Help with MLA Use these helpful websites to find out more about citing sources. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/search.php http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/74 7/2/ http://www.easybib.com/ For Verbal Citations, read this: http://libguides.greenriver.edu/content.php?pid =53310&sid=2604145

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