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The sandwich is like
a warm fire in this
picture. You can see
the family in the
photograph warming
their hands by the
croi...
“Beautiful. Beneficial.
Neutrogena” is an
example of alliteration
because of the
repeated “b” sound.
This makeup is advert...
This ad is an example of metaphor
because it compares the part in
someone’s hair to the “line of
scrimmage.” The game fiel...
“Water will be tangerine
with envy” is an example
of alliteration because of
the repeated “w” sounds.
It is also an exampl...
“Pennies a page,” is an
example of alliteration
because of the repeated
“p” sounds.
“Our tracking software
increases the m...
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
Real world examples2 explained
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Real world examples2 explained

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Advertisements from magazines that make interesting use of rhetorical appeals.

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Transcript of "Real world examples2 explained"

  1. 1. The sandwich is like a warm fire in this picture. You can see the family in the photograph warming their hands by the croissanwich. This is an example of simile. “America Runs on Dunkin” is an example of personification because a country doesn’t physically “run” like a human can. This ad attempts to solve the problem of hunger by offering a sandwich as a solution. Instead of purchasing the sandwich, we could just wake up earlier and eat breakfast at home.
  2. 2. “Beautiful. Beneficial. Neutrogena” is an example of alliteration because of the repeated “b” sound. This makeup is advertised to be “mean to blemishes.” This is an example of personification because inanimate objects can’t be mean like people can. This product tries to solve the problem of dirty, unnatural, rough looking skin by offering a natural-looking, oil-free makeup that has an acne treatment and will make your skin look “Smooth. Clean. Natural.” It also attempts to solve the problem of finding makeup that matches darker skin tones by offering “3 new deeper shades.” It’s possible to solve this problem by simply not wearing makeup, and treating the problem with other products.
  3. 3. This ad is an example of metaphor because it compares the part in someone’s hair to the “line of scrimmage.” The game field is the hair and scalp, and the “goal” of the game is healthy hair. The white markings on this image help us to see the metaphor because they are like the markings made to plan a play for a football game. This ad attempts to solve the problem of healthy hair and scalp by offering their shampoo and conditioner as a solution.We could solve the problem of healthy hair and scalp with other products.
  4. 4. “Water will be tangerine with envy” is an example of alliteration because of the repeated “w” sounds. It is also an example of personification because envy is an emotion that an inanimate object can’t feel. “Cool, crisp water” is another example of alliteration because of the repeated “c” sounds. This ad attempts to solve the problem of finding a low-calorie drink that will quench your thirst. The ad offers Tropicana Fruit Squeeze as a low-calorie beverage that tastes like juice, but doesn’t have all the calories. People could just drink water, which has no calories, or they could drink small amounts of juice since it is good for you. An alternative is to buy juice, and add some of it to a reusable container of water. This is reduces waste, is probably cheaper and may have less preservatives.
  5. 5. “Pennies a page,” is an example of alliteration because of the repeated “p” sounds. “Our tracking software increases the mileage you get out of color” is an example of metaphor because it compares the color ink to a car. This ad attempts to solve the problem of expensive color copies by offering a service, and a product, that creates color copies for “pennies a page.” Businesses could print in black and white or use markers or colored pencils to color their copies, but this wouldn’t be practical because it would waste time and energy. They could also just not make any copies, and instead show the information on a projector.
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