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Inferencing july12 slides
 

Inferencing july12 slides

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J. Michael Woody

J. Michael Woody

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    Inferencing july12 slides Inferencing july12 slides Presentation Transcript

    • TEACHING THE STEPSINFERENCING IN FICTION AND NONFICTION TEXT
    • You make inferences in fiction about: EVIDENCE FROM THE TEXT
    • Inferences in fiction
    • MAKING INFERENCES ABOUT CHARACTER• Read a small chunk: STOP • THINK • TALK/WRITE• Think about characters actions, dialogue, relationships• What is a smart guess I could make (inference) about the character• What evidence do I have to support my inference?
    • You make inferences in nonfiction about: EVIDENCE FROM THE TEXT
    • What can you inference about this photograph? (Visual Example)
    • What can you inference about this photograph? (Visual Example)
    • MAKING INFERENCES FROM FACTS• Read a small chunk of text and underline a fact that is presented• Come up with possible inferences about that fact OR• If you have problems, then think about questions the fact raises• Try to think of possible answers to your questions (these answers will be your inferences)• Think about each inference – give each one a rating (see below)• Choose the inferences that have a 3 or 4 rating (these are the best ones)• Keep reading the text and underline evidence that supports your inference1 = Not Likely 2 = Possibly 3 = Very Likely 4 = Almost Certain
    • MAKING INFERENCES FROM FACTS FACTS: deal with pieces of information that one has heard, seen or read, and which are open to discovery or verification. The key word here is “verification”. A fact is a statement that can be ‘verified’. A fact is either true or false. Facts are statements that may involve numbers, natural phenomena, dates etc. The characteristics of the statements classified as facts are:• Made after observation or experience. An event cannot become a fact unless it has occurred.• Confined to what one observes; cannot be made about the future.• Limited number possible.• Not perception dependent. A fact will be agreed to by every person. It does not change from person to person.• Tends to bring people together in agreement.
    • Example 1: FACTA football field is 100 yards long.
    • Example 2: FACTThis oil spill has now obtained the dubiousdistinction of being the worst oil spill in UShistory, surpassing the damage done by the Exxon Valdez tanker that spilled 11 milliongallons of oil into the ecologically sensitive Prince William Sound in 1989.
    • EXAMPLE: NONFICTION Think about the fact presented Come up with possible inferences If you have problems, then think about questions the fact raises Try to think of possible answers to your questions These will be your inferences Think about each inference – give each one a rating Choose the inferences that have a 3 or 4 rating What evidence from the text can support your answer?1 = Not Likely 2 = Possibly 3 = Very Likely 4 = Almost Certain