Wwp Fort Wayne Sustainability For Slide Share

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  • The Consent Decree, which covers the sanitary system as well as the CSO LTCP, does include a green infrastructure component.Reference AMS presentations, give v. brief overview. Note public interest in the program.Other programs: Green City Business Program: pollution prevention, solid waste reduction, energy and water conservation.There is a growing public interest in preserving and managing natural resourcesSo, how to combine the interest and benefits of green infrastructure with the reliability and cost effectiveness of grey?
  • Agreed early-on that we wanted a) a triple-bottom line approach; and, b) a scorecardDRIVING CHANGESmall group of City and County staff from various departments determined direction of processHow will green be received by community?How green should Fort Wayne be?Set goals for the green standardsConducted series of green workshops to “sell” green to staff and outside users of stormwater standards.15 seconds
  • City of SeattleCity of Seattle LTCP amended to require the use of Green InfrastructureKing County ordinance requires all capital projects to use sustainable scorecard and meet LEED standardFocus on social and environmental benefits, outside of project scope and goalsSecured separate funding for sustainable implementationQuantitative analysis scorecard, but designed for use on all capital projectsMilwaukeeEvaluate the overall cost effectiveness of BMPs to:Reduce storm water runoff volumeModel predictions and documented pilot projectsReduce storm water peak flow ratesModel predictions and documented pilot projectsImprove water qualityEnhance public educationMany projects being “piloted” to demonstrate effectivenessEvaluate BMPs as effective alternative to grey infrastructureCity of Port CoquitlamFirst sustainability checklist to be introduced in North American municipalityFocused on rezoning and developmentUses a weighting systemIncorporates Triple Bottom Line accounting to measure environmental, economic and social criteria for development projects.
  • Policy position: strike a balance. Take advantage of benefits of bothEvaluation process fair to grey as well as greenConsistent across different neighborhoodsStructured but not rigidFlexible but consistent
  • Policy position: strike a balance. Take advantage of benefits of bothEvaluation process fair to grey as well as greenConsistent across different neighborhoodsStructured but not rigidFlexible but consistent
  • Sustainability has a role across all aspects of City Utilities.It is being recognized that there is a value to utility by-products that used to be considered waste. Methane has potential (check in with Doug)Sustainability includes better managing and utilizing existing system, protecting investments. Through asset management, we are taking steps to improve the ops of the systems, allowing man-power to be focused on fixing problems instead of finding them.New construction provides an opportunity to build smarter and provide added benefits to neighborhoods and receiving waters.
  • Transition slide from Justin (policy) to Tina (implementation)In order to achieveRetaining cost effectivenessEnhancing benefitsIncreases sustainabilityImproving quality of life
  • Sustainability generally “happens” during construction. But to make it happen, it has to be thought about long before ground is broken.Sustainability is a natural element of design, from selecting materials and suppliers to mean and methods but if sustainability starts here, the budget may be in for a surpriseIncluding sustainability at the planning level, including in alternatives costing and evaluation, provides the best opportunity to explore sustainable options and the benefits they can provide.For the past two years, sustainability has been a part of the City’s requirement and evaluation process for qualifications and proposals. This gets every thinking about sustainability before the process has even begun.
  • A triple bottom line scorecard was developed as a planning to toprovides project managers with additional information for decision making, similar for a knee of the curve analysis or life cycle cost. It does not say “here is the answer, build this”. What is does is provide a way of expressing the value added for added dollars.Tested against previous projects.
  • Introduce scorecard. Three sections. Each section has multiple metrics that address either a priority of the community, a regulatory requirement or an operational issue. The metrics are described in detail to aid in interpretation. A “read me” document is being developed as a companion with explanations of the metric and how to calculate the values.Looking at the Social Metric, the highest weights of 3 were given to work that contributes to the downtown revitalization, CSO volume reduction and basement flooding. With basement flooding reduction, the metric is expressed as linear feet of pipe with HGL above basement elevations. Extends the use of the hydraulic model.
  • Introduce scorecard. Three sections. Each section has multiple metrics that address either a priority of the community, a regulatory requirement or an operational issue. The metrics are described in detail to aid in interpretation. A “read me” document is being developed as a companion with explanations of the metric and how to calculate the values.Looking at the Social Metric, the highest weights of 3 were given to work that contributes to the downtown revitalization, CSO volume reduction and basement flooding. With basement flooding reduction, the metric is expressed as linear feet of pipe with HGL above basement elevations. Extends the use of the hydraulic model.
  • Environmental Metric has the highest weights for discharge velocity and discharge volume, both relating to streambank erosion. Lit research found a fairly simple method for calculating carbon footprint that is based on direct combustion, direct process and electricity. It falls short of going to the harvest of the resources but gives a measure of the local footprint.
  • Economic contains most of the metrics we are use to looking at for CSO Planning – knee of curve metrics.Metrics added: Funding opportunities. Funding or partially funding a project.Use of existing assets recognizes the value of investments made.
  • In order to achieveRetaining cost effectivenessEnhancing benefitsIncreases sustainabilityImproving quality of life
  • In order to achieveRetaining cost effectivenessEnhancing benefitsIncreases sustainabilityImproving quality of life
  • In order to achieveRetaining cost effectivenessEnhancing benefitsIncreases sustainabilityImproving quality of life
  • Utilizing a balanced sustainable approach enables the utility to utilize the best of the traditional and sustainable worlds. Importantly, it provides a venue to be flexible to change. We know
  • DRIVING CHANGESmall group of City and County staff from various departments determined direction of processHow will green be received by community?How green should Fort Wayne be?Set goals for the green standardsConducted series of green workshops to “sell” green to staff and outside users of stormwater standards.15 seconds
  • Wwp Fort Wayne Sustainability For Slide Share

    1. 1. Justin Brugger Tina Wolff City of Fort Wayne, Indiana Malcolm Pirnie/ARCADISWet Weather PartnershipConference 2012
    2. 2. Wet Weather PartnershipConference 2012 Follow the Green Brick Road Fort Wayne’s Path to Urban Sustainability
    3. 3. Welcome to Fort Wayne
    4. 4. Basic Premise How green should Fort Wayne be? How will green be received by the community?
    5. 5. Other Communities• Varies from extreme to minimal• Related to LTCP, green infrastructure is being done where CD/ LTCP allows credit to be taken• Qualitative versus quantitative metrics• Some resources available: scorecards, rating sheets
    6. 6. Community Values ECONOMICSOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
    7. 7. Strike a Balance Gates & Valves Pipes Storage Tanks Rain GardenPervious Pavement Green Roof
    8. 8. Strike a Balance• Retain basic cost-effectiveness• Enhance benefits for $$ spent• Increase long-term sustainability• Improve quality of life
    9. 9. Sustainability Across City UtilitiesSTRATEGIC USE OF UNDERUTILIZED RESOURCES • Digester gas / methane use • Geothermal dischargeASSET MANAGEMENT • Real time monitoring/ control of systems • Capital ProjectsCAPITAL PROJECTS
    10. 10. Metrics How do we best integrate metrics into capital projects?
    11. 11. Sustainability in All Phases• Construction• Design• Planning• Request for Qualifications / Request for Proposal
    12. 12. Planning for Informed Decisions
    13. 13. Triple Bottom Line
    14. 14. Social• Downtown Revitalization• Percentage of CSO volume reduction• Reduction in basement flooding• Reduction in street flooding• Job creation on capital projects• Access to scenic features and recreational areas• Benefits of streetscape improvements• Project specific criteria (to be listed prior to alternative evaluation)
    15. 15. Environmental• Streambank erosion control: Velocity• Streambank erosion control: Discharge velocity• Flood protection• Local water quality: Total Suspended Solids• Investment risk against mandates after CD• Carbon footprint• Biological diversity: quality of vegetation• Biological diversity: area of vegetation• Project specific criteria (to be listed prior to alternative evaluation)
    16. 16. Economic• Capital cost per gallon CSO reduction• Lifecycle O&M cost per gallon CSO reduction• Other funding opportunities and/or shared resources• Projected savings – joint savings• Use of existing assets• Capital cost per pound TSS reduction• Project specific criteria (to be listed prior to alternative evaluation)
    17. 17. Sewershed Planning What happens when you apply integrated metrics to sewershed planning studies?
    18. 18. Expanded PlanningMODIFICATION OF PLANNING PROCESS• Greater in depth analysis of green infrastructure costs and benefits• Motivation to improve upon grey performance numbers• Better planning level cost estimates• Better use of Lifecycle Costs
    19. 19. Study Results4 SUBBASINS ALTERNATIVES 4 SUBBASINS SOLUTIONS • 3 asset management • 1 asset management • 6 grey • 0 grey • 2 green • 1 green • 6 grey/green • 2 grey/green
    20. 20. Downtown MasterplanningWhat happens when youapply integrated metrics to downtown masterplanning?
    21. 21. Expanded Benefits
    22. 22. Complementary Practices Green Tree Box Rainwater Harvesting RoofBioretention/Rain GardenRainwater HarvestingGreen Roof / Blue RoofPorous Pavement Porous Pavement BioretentionTree Box
    23. 23. Recommended Solutions 6 CSO Sub-Basins 2 Green 4 Grey  14 acres (9%) proposed green practices  Stormwater Storage  Estimated 2.3 million gallons storage  Pollutant Removal  270 lbs/yr TP  2,200 lbs/yr TN  62,330 lbs/yr TSS
    24. 24. End Result Does the end result meet the goals of value- driven, practical, and balanced?
    25. 25. Existing Conditions
    26. 26. Design Process Pervious Pervious Concrete Pavement (incl. header) Thickness 230’ x 40’ 8” Lead Est. CSO by Reduction Example 140,000 gal/year Meets Drainage Consent Layer Decree 24” – 48”
    27. 27. Design Process Lack of Pervious Pervious Soil Experience Concrete Pavement Condition (incl. header) Thickness 230’ x 40’ 8” Lead Est. CSO Existing Reduction byConditions 140,000 Example gal/year Prove It Meets Drainage Coordination Works Consent Layer Decree 24” – 48”
    28. 28. Construction
    29. 29. Lessons Learned Coordination Inverted is difficult crown not necessary Pervious is art not science Public and Flow Political monitoring is Perception not easy
    30. 30. Change is Coming New regulations Economic fluctuations New technologies Public interest Climate change
    31. 31. Summary Value Driven Practical Balanced
    32. 32. Questions?Justin BruggerCity of Fort WayneCitizens Square, Suite 250Fort Wayne, Indiana 46802(260) 427-1117 directjustin.brugger@cityoffortwayne.org

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