Ron Ansd Jeff Compile 2 Chicago Christian Industrial League

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Ron Ansd Jeff Compile 2 Chicago Christian Industrial League

  1. 1. CCIL Audit Page 1 of 9 Module 7: Report of Fund Development Audit Activity With Christian Industrial League Executive Director Judy McIntyre By Jeffery Massey, Sr. Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  2. 2. CCIL Audit Page 2 of 9 The Chicago Christian Industrial League (CCIL) and their developmental structure have truly stood the test of time. Founded in 1909, it has indeed made several changes over the course of almost 100 years. Their commitment to individuals that according to the Chief Executive Officer don’t have a voice is interesting given the fact that this agency has historically been operating during some of the most improvised and dire times in American history. The changing North Lawndale community (which is where the current headquarters is located) and other communities along West Roosevelt currently going under a dramatic change in which more individuals that were once not willing to reside in this community now are beginning to reside here due to the development and the rising cost of the community. As a result, individuals are beginning to make more survival choices that only 10 years ago was not even an issue. These issues have placed a greater strain on an already tense North Lawndale community for resources and financial opportunities. It is the overall objective of the CEO and the Communications Manager (who was also present in the meeting with us) that their clientele achieves self-sufficiency through the many resources that are currently being provided. The organization is currently looking at every avenue they can to identify sources to aid in this need, but it is admitted that there is a challenge to continue advocacy efforts while the funding is slowing becoming an issue. This issue is shared with agencies throughout the state, and CCIL is making the best effort despite the current status. Overall, while there is concern for advocacy and money, CCIL takes great pride in being a stable community influence for just about 100 years. And we are grateful to have the Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  3. 3. CCIL Audit Page 3 of 9 opportunity to spend time with the current CEO and Communications Manager in our educational process. This is a field assessment report. Our group #2, which consisted of Ronald Barnes, Kevin Smith and myself, conducted a development fund audit of the Chicago Christian Industrial League (CCIL) on Tuesday August 26, 2008 at 1 p.m. The meeting, facilitated by the league’s executive director Judy McIntyre, who was accompanied by communications manager Jenny Brandhorst, was held at the headquarters office tower located on 2750 W. Roosevelt Road in Chicago. Ms. McIntyre expressed wholehearted support and interest in this activity I initiated with her through my longstanding admiration for CCIL’s prestigious work assisting the homeless and addressing the impact of homeless impoverishment in Chicago. She presented an expert, intellectual and insightful perspective of the league’s strategic processes related to funding development. Among the many topics she briefed our group on were for example her stressed emphasis upon the areas concerning the development of new funding opportunities and donor resources, capital program deficit management, the negative impact of dwindling philanthropic motivation within this harsh economic environment. She also spoke to the challenges of maintaining cohesion and relevancy for core mission values that are shared with stakeholders and contributors past, present and future. So in fact the most knowledgeable part of this venture to interview the current CEO was that the development structure of an organization such as this for the most part has to continually change with the current times that were considered present. Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  4. 4. CCIL Audit Page 4 of 9 The CEO spoke to us regarding the types of barriers that are the focus of the organization. These barriers include social, educational, drug, financial, and others that are activated due to the choices these individuals make. Also in the discussion there was a suggestion that the people that are serviced have at some point in time become victims of abuse. As a result of these barriers, the people were already at a disadvantage from the start. There was also discussion in regards to the reorganization of low-income communities and how this also has become a new barrier for the individuals serviced. In regards to the development of CCIL, there are several trends they have identified as important, with the three most important being to raising money, raising awareness, and obtaining representation (or the people of influence). To drive this point home during the interview, the CEO discussed several key individuals that are committed to the cause that once were homeless themselves. Some of these individuals are actually current board members and very active in the cause of being advocates. Where this is good for the cause, there are other individuals of influence that have been called upon to raise money and awareness, but decided at some point not to be involved with the cause of this organization for various reasons. The notion of development even went to the changing of the Board of Directors, which in the past were individuals that shared very little with the cause of homelessness, and for that matter was not connected with the communities of Chicago. The CEO made it a point to emphasize that there were efforts to seek different cultural representation on the board, which includes individuals that were at once homeless themselves. And because of these changes, there is an effort to reach out to Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  5. 5. CCIL Audit Page 5 of 9 former donors and organizations that once gave to the CCIL to research reasons why they decided not to give any longer. This is an effort to cultivate these relationships once again for the basis of increasing awareness and money. Another interesting attempt to reach new support demographics are the Communications Manager’s decision to design young professionals boards that are advocates to the self-sufficiency of these individuals. This effort is to raise awareness and possible new donors from the demographic group of ages 21-34. Both the CEO and the Communications Manager agree that their biggest obstacle is not only money (which as a result of the new state budget, is becoming every agency’s concern) but technology as well. Their commitment to changing their technology structure and becoming innovative with their funding efforts is another strong point of progression in the development of their organization. It was discussed with the group that the technology of an organization is vital with the current structure of revenue and advocacy. Internet sites and donation opportunities that are convenient for donors are becoming as important as the literature the website will provide She discussed the storied history of CCIL’s 100-year battle to help the homeless rebuild their lives. She expressed a desire to move the CCIL toward a greater ability to carry out it’s mission through innovations in technology, strategic planning and funding initiatives that included the re-defining of the public’s perceptions of the homeless dilemma and their needs. McIntyre and CCIL offer programs to give clients in need the tools, chances and support to return to the workforce and regain economic stability and independence. They offer transitional residential programming, case management, Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  6. 6. CCIL Audit Page 6 of 9 community resource referral, outreach, job skills and academic training. During the course of the audit particular strengths and weaknesses related to support of the mission stood out in her responses. Of the 82 questions delivered within the categories ranging from organizational purpose, planning and constituency development to fund development planning and valuation there were 25 answers of above standard [we operate regularly this way], 35 answers of standard [we usually operate this way] and 22 below standard answers [we don’t operate this way]. It appears from her responses of below standard that CCIL’s prominent deficiencies occur in the areas of constituency development, organizational operations and leadership/fund development. I concur with Ms. McIntyre’s assessment that CCIL must do the following: • Develop clarity of vision for identifying, while building relationships, new donor markets • Refine and increase instruments that compile/evaluate lifestyle and demographic information of clients at risk • Innovate strategies for developing donor/prospect relations As well, the organization’s operational weaknesses involve the relativity of board representation to the community-organization’s constituency. The CCIL board, which consists of 16 life-long members of whom all but 4 average nearly 15 years tenure, reflects a CEO concern for the lack of new or incumbent leadership insuring an influx of continuity and fresh opinions. This may be resolved thru improved board recruitment within the service community and installing term/tenure limitations. Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  7. 7. CCIL Audit Page 7 of 9 Also, Ms. McIntyre showed interest in facilitating developmental staff workshops and conferences that are conducive to fund development expertise. I concur with this assessment. As well, CCIL might consider an increase in the effectiveness of fund development by innovating the solicitation process towards a matching of donor outreach with individually tailored solicitors who possess unique knowledge of contributory behaviors and conditions conducive to acquiring donations. Budgetary shortfalls and a deep recession-economy impact CCIL’s ability to give adequate fund development support, she mentioned. Therefore, I also recommend new outreach initiatives that explore expanding the communication of CCIL’s mission and funding-donor needs. I recommend as well innovating the use of radio, the Internet and collaborative partnerships with both public health and philanthropic peers who share mission values on homelessness and its societal impact. Faith-based initiatives and political advocacy benefits are but one suggestion. New evaluation and analysis of the impact of homelessness upon crime, healthcare, education, religion and the political milieu should induce new avenues for shared advocacies. This includes resource development amongst those entities that can be committed to the communities in which they serve. An example would be major universities that conduct urban planning and community development or medical centers and socially conscious city corporations. Seeking new grant sources that align the impacting of homelessness with antiviolence/gang initiatives of the U.S. Departments of Justice, Labor, and Education or the Alliance for Quality Healthcare Research (AFQHR) is another option. Crises intervention models and outreach for at-risk homeless kids and families in gang-infested communities is another. As well, I suggest an expansion of fund development outreach Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  8. 8. CCIL Audit Page 8 of 9 to churches and foundations into more diverse representations that open up new avenues for charitable donor activity and support. Increased information technology advances and human resources training can be aligned with CCIL’s unique position as a prime database provider informing of the conditions and the impact of homelessness and poverty for the research activity of private, governmental and academic policy institutions. There are strategic planning sessions currently underway with the Board of Directors and the CEO that will discuss more opportunities with raising awareness and money for the cause of self-sufficiency. The CEO discussed only briefly that in the collective opinion, the board aspects of the organization needs to be reviewed and planned better, since there are changes within the structure of the board. The CEO and Communications Manager went into discussion more about the organization and some of the aspects that are important. For the most part, organizational planning, acknowledgement and recognition of gifts, development within the institution, marketing and communications, organizational leadership, and the organizations purpose are the strongest points of CCIL. This provided proof that the focus of CCIL over the years has not lost the purpose for operation. The CEO discussed during the interview in regards of organizational operations that this will be a continued work in progress since you want your organization to continue with the current trends of the changing times. Where this is evident is the fact that the organization will be celebrating its centennial next year. The constituency development is also work in progress with the notion that the previous donors and new donor outlets are constantly being researched, which returns Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010
  9. 9. CCIL Audit Page 9 of 9 us to the original discussion or raising awareness and money. This ties into the thought of leadership and fund development. While there are changes currently underway with the board, there is a commitment to strategic planning that will provide future opportunities for the CCIL. Due to the lack of resources, the development of staff is also a work in progress that CCIL is making a strong commitment to according to the CEO. Funding development and funding these efforts are probably the more challenging objectives of CCIL. Resources are still scarcer and the need to identify funding is becoming more important to CCIL. The organization is currently looking at every avenue they can to identify sources to aid in this need, but it is admitted that there is a challenge to continue advocacy efforts while the funding is slowing becoming an issue. This issue is shared with agencies throughout the state, and CCIL is making the best effort despite the current status. Overall, while there is concern for advocacy and money, CCIL takes great pride in being a stable community influence for just about 100 years. And we are grateful to have the opportunity to spend time with the current CEO and Communications Manager in our educational process. Module 7: Field Assignment/Strategic Planning Instructor-Dr. Phillip Lesser [Interim Instructor- Dr. Karin Baird] 4/15/2010

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