Siebel Business Process
Framework: Workflow
Guide
Version 8.0
December 2006
Copyright © 2005, 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved.

The Programs (which include both the software and documentation) con...
Contents


Chapter 1: What’s New in This Release

Chapter 2: Overview of Siebel Workflow
General Principles of Workflow   ...
Contents ■




Defining a Test and Migration Strategy for Workflow Processes            58
Verifying Workflow Policies Ins...
Contents ■




   Field Descriptions: Workflow Branches 102
   Field Descriptions: Compose Condition Criteria Dialog Box  ...
Contents ■




    Defining User Interact Next Step Branches 133
    About Conditions and Values for User Interact Next St...
Contents ■




   Using Error Processes to Handle Errors 161
   Passing User-Defined Process Properties and Property Sets ...
Contents ■




    Viewing Run-time Instances of a Workflow Process 190
    Stopping a Workflow Process Instance 190
    S...
Contents ■




   Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Send Message Broadcast Action 221
   Example of a Workfl...
Contents ■




     Example of Using a Predefined Workflow Policy Program: Change SR Owner to Manager
       261
     Exam...
Contents ■




Chapter 11: Reference Materials for Siebel Workflow
Siebel Workflow Terminology       298
Examples of Creat...
Contents ■




12    Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
1              What’s New in This Release


What’s New in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide,
Version 8.0
I...
What’s New in This Release ■




Table 1.     New Product Features in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, V...
What’s New in This Release ■




Table 1.   New Product Features in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, Ver...
What’s New in This Release ■




16    Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
2               Overview of Siebel Workflow


This chapter provides a conceptual overview of Siebel Workflow. Siebel Workf...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




■    Tasks. Allows you to create wizard-like user interfa...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




Service departments have sets of defined rules that match...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




Invoking Workflow Processes
Workflow processes can be inv...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




■   Send Email. This is an automated business service act...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




Workflow Policies Structure
The basic underlying construc...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




You can specify several actions for one workflow policy, ...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow




■    External Program. A program of this type allows you ...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ Workflow Roles




Workflow Policies enforces policies at the data layer, through database t...
Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ Workflow Roles




26    Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
3              Introduction to Workflow
               Processes


Siebel Workflow is an interactive software tool that le...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Workflow Processes Development
Lifecycle...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




An implementation project team typically...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Table 2.     Using Siebel Workflow for A...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




For more information on Workflow Policie...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Some of the basic constructs of Siebel W...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Rules
There are several ways to implemen...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Decision Points
Decision points exit wit...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Actions
There are several ways to effect...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




■    FINS Data Transfer Utilities

■    ...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Though compiling a Siebel Repository Fil...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Using Exception Branches
You can program...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




Testing and Troubleshooting Workflows
Th...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




■    Workflow Process Execution (PrcExec...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




■   Using Siebel Tools for importing wor...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle




For more information on migration utilit...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Design-Time Architecture of Workflow




For more information, see “Monitoring and Tr...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Design-Time Architecture of Workflow




Use the Process Designer in Siebel Tools to ...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Simulation Architecture of Workflow




Simulation Architecture of Workflow
After des...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Deployment Architecture of Workflow




Deployment Architecture of Workflow
After des...
Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Run-Time Architecture of Workflow




Run-Time Architecture of Workflow
The Workflow ...
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  1. 1. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 December 2006
  2. 2. Copyright © 2005, 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved. The Programs (which include both the software and documentation) contain proprietary information; they are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and are also protected by copyright, patent, and other intellectual and industrial property laws. Reverse engineering, disassembly, or decompilation of the Programs, except to the extent required to obtain interoperability with other independently created software or as specified by law, is prohibited. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. If you find any problems in the documentation, please report them to us in writing. This document is not warranted to be error- free. Except as may be expressly permitted in your license agreement for these Programs, no part of these Programs may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose. PRODUCT MODULES AND OPTIONS. This guide contains descriptions of modules that are optional and for which you may not have purchased a license. Siebel’s Sample Database also includes data related to these optional modules. As a result, your software implementation may differ from descriptions in this guide. To find out more about the modules your organization has purchased, see your corporate purchasing agent or your Siebel sales representative. If the Programs are delivered to the United States Government or anyone licensing or using the Programs on behalf of the United States Government, the following notice is applicable: U.S. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS. Programs, software, databases, and related documentation and technical data delivered to U.S. Government customers are "commercial computer software" or "commercial technical data" pursuant to the applicable Federal Acquisition Regulation and agency-specific supplemental regulations. As such, use, duplication, disclosure, modification, and adaptation of the Programs, including documentation and technical data, shall be subject to the licensing restrictions set forth in the applicable Oracle license agreement, and, to the extent applicable, the additional rights set forth in FAR 52.227-19, Commercial Computer Software--Restricted Rights (June 1987). Oracle USA, Inc., 500 Oracle Parkway, Redwood City, CA 94065. The Programs are not intended for use in any nuclear, aviation, mass transit, medical, or other inherently dangerous applications. It shall be the licensee's responsibility to take all appropriate fail-safe, backup, redundancy and other measures to ensure the safe use of such applications if the Programs are used for such purposes, and we disclaim liability for any damages caused by such use of the Programs. Oracle, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, and Siebel are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. The Programs may provide links to Web sites and access to content, products, and services from third parties. Oracle is not responsible for the availability of, or any content provided on, third-party Web sites. You bear all risks associated with the use of such content. If you choose to purchase any products or services from a third party, the relationship is directly between you and the third party. Oracle is not responsible for: (a) the quality of third-party products or services; or (b) fulfilling any of the terms of the agreement with the third party, including delivery of products or services and warranty obligations related to purchased products or services. Oracle is not responsible for any loss or damage of any sort that you may incur from dealing with any third party.
  3. 3. Contents Chapter 1: What’s New in This Release Chapter 2: Overview of Siebel Workflow General Principles of Workflow 18 Understanding the Workflow Processes Module 19 Understanding the Workflow Policies Module 21 Workflow Roles 25 Chapter 3: Introduction to Workflow Processes Overview of the Workflow Architecture 27 Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle 28 Analyzing Process Requirements 28 Defining Workflows 31 Identifying and Building Exception Handling 37 Testing and Troubleshooting Workflows 39 Migrating Workflows to Production 40 Deploying Workflows in Production 42 Monitoring Workflow Execution 42 Design-Time Architecture of Workflow 43 Simulation Architecture of Workflow 45 Deployment Architecture of Workflow 46 Run-Time Architecture of Workflow 47 Workflow Interaction with Other Siebel Components 52 Chapter 4: Planning Workflow Processes Gathering Information for Workflow Process Planning 55 Understanding Workflow Process Requirements 56 Seeded Workflow Processes 57 Considering Business Objects and Business Services When Planning Workflow Processes 57 Defining a Primary Business Component for a Business Object 57 Enabling a Business Service for Workflow Processes 58 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 3
  4. 4. Contents ■ Defining a Test and Migration Strategy for Workflow Processes 58 Verifying Workflow Policies Installation 59 Verifying the Repository Setting for Workflow Policies Installation 59 Verifying the Workflow Setup for Workflow Policies Installation 59 Upgrading Siebel Workflow 60 Chapter 5: For Developers: Basics of Building Workflow Processes Overview of Developing a Workflow Process 61 Siebel Tools and Workflow Processes 62 Using Process Designer in Siebel Tools 64 About the Design Functions of the Process Designer 64 About the Multi Value Property Window 65 Field Descriptions: Workflow Processes 66 Field Descriptions: Process Properties for Workflows 71 Process Designer Palette Items 73 About Defining Workflow Process Parameters and Steps 75 Reviewing Existing Workflow Processes 76 Defining a New Workflow Process 76 Naming Conventions for Workflow Processes, Steps, Branches, and Process Properties 77 Modifying Existing Process Definitions 78 Tutorial: Using Process Designer in Siebel Tools 79 Chapter 6: For Developers: Workflow Process Steps About the Workflow Processes OBLE in Siebel Tools 89 Diagramming a Workflow Process 90 Defining Step Details for a Workflow Process 91 Deleting a Workflow Step 92 Deleting a Workflow Process 92 Copying a Workflow Process 92 About Process Properties 93 Process Properties Versus Property Sets 95 Passing Property Sets by Reference 96 Defining Process Properties 96 Concatenating Process Properties 97 Passing Process Properties In and Out of Steps 98 Field Descriptions for Defining Workflow Process Steps 99 Field Descriptions: Workflow Steps 99 4 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  5. 5. Contents ■ Field Descriptions: Workflow Branches 102 Field Descriptions: Compose Condition Criteria Dialog Box 105 About Start Steps 107 Defining a Start Step 107 Defining Next Step Branches for Start Steps 108 About Conditions and Values 108 Building Expressions with Expression Builder 109 About Decision Points 112 Defining a Decision Point 113 Defining Decision Branches 113 About Conditions and Values for Decision Points 114 About Business Service Steps 114 Field Descriptions: Input Arguments for Business Service Steps, Subprocess Steps, and Wait Steps 115 Field Descriptions: Output Arguments for Business Service Steps, Subprocess Steps, and Siebel Operation Steps 116 Defining a Business Service Step 118 Defining Input Arguments for Business Service Steps 119 Defining Output Arguments for Business Service Steps 119 Enabling the Pass By Reference Feature for Business Services That Support It 119 About Subprocess Steps 120 Field Descriptions: Step Recipients 120 Field Descriptions: Subprocess Steps 121 Defining a Subprocess Step 122 Defining Input Arguments for Subprocess Steps 122 Defining Output Arguments for Subprocess Steps 123 Defining Recipients for Subprocess Steps 123 Enabling a Subprocess to Support Pass By Reference 123 About Siebel Operation Steps 124 Defining a Siebel Operation Step 125 Defining Fields for a Siebel Operation Step 126 Defining Siebel Operation Search Specifications 126 Defining Siebel Operation Step Output Arguments 127 Field Descriptions: Search Specifications 128 Updating a Field Based on a Multi-Value Group 129 Traversing a Record Set 129 About Wait Steps 130 Defining a Wait Step 130 About User Interact Steps 131 Defining a User Interact Step 132 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 5
  6. 6. Contents ■ Defining User Interact Next Step Branches 133 About Conditions and Values for User Interact Next Step Branches 133 Creating Substitute View Names with Process Properties 134 About Task Steps 134 Defining a Task Step 134 About Stop Steps 137 Defining a Stop Step 138 Defining Stop Step Input Arguments 138 About End Steps 139 Defining an End Step 139 Chapter 7: For Developers: Understanding How Workflow Processes Are Designed About Workflow Modes 141 About 7.0 Workflow Processes 143 About Long-Running Workflow Processes 143 About Interactive Workflow Processes 144 About Service Workflow Processes 144 Building Long-Running Workflow Processes 145 Assigning Subprocesses to End Users to Create Collaborative Long-Running Workflows 145 Configuring Long-Running Workflows to Invoke Tasks 146 Building Interactive Workflow Processes 146 Creating Synthetic Event Buttons to Control User Navigation 147 About Suspension and Resumption of Interactive Workflow Processes 151 About Forward and Backward Navigation between Views 153 Using Workflow Persistence 154 About Workflow Persistence 154 Enabling Workflow Persistence 155 Handling Events 155 Using Run-Time Events 155 About the Workflow User Event Business Service 157 Generating User Events with the User Event Business Service 158 Configuring Long-Running Workflow Processes to Wait for User Events 159 Workflow and Global Implementations 159 Configuring Workflows in a Multilingual Environment 159 Defining Expressions for Workflows Running in a Multilingual Environment 160 Wait Steps and Global Time Calculations in Workflow 160 Handling Errors 161 6 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  7. 7. Contents ■ Using Error Processes to Handle Errors 161 Passing User-Defined Process Properties and Property Sets to Error Processes 162 Assigning Error Processes to Subprocesses 162 Using Exceptions to Handle Errors 163 Defining Exceptions 163 Recovering Workflow Processes 164 Automatic Recovery of Workflow Process Instances 164 Manual Recovery of Workflow Process Instances 165 Invoking Workflow Processes 165 About Invoking a Workflow Process 165 Invoking a Workflow Process from a Workflow Policy 166 Invoking a Workflow Process from a Script 167 Example: Invoking a Workflow from a Script in Object Manager 168 Example: Invoking a Workflow from a Script to Pass Field Values to Process Properties 168 Invoking a Workflow Process from a Run-Time Event 169 Invoking a Workflow Process through a Configured Business Service 170 Running a Workflow Process in the Workflow Process Manager 171 Running a Workflow Process in the Application Object Manager 172 Running a Workflow Process in Batch Mode 172 Chapter 8: For Developers: Testing Workflow Processes Using the Validate Tool to Correct Errors in Workflow Processes 175 Testing Workflow Processes with the Process Simulator 176 About the Process Simulator and Supported Modes for Simulation 177 Running the Process Simulator 178 Troubleshooting Workflow Process Simulation 180 Testing Workflows That Involve Server Components 180 Chapter 9: For Administrators: Administering Workflow Processes About Deploying Workflow Processes 181 Deploying Workflow Processes 182 Deploying Workflow Processes to Mobile Clients 184 Restricting Mobile Client Routing 184 Deploying Workflow Processes on Regional Nodes 184 Migrating Workflow Processes from Development to Production 185 Importing or Exporting a Process Definition 187 Administering Workflow Processes in the Run-Time Client 188 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 7
  8. 8. Contents ■ Viewing Run-time Instances of a Workflow Process 190 Stopping a Workflow Process Instance 190 Stopping All Workflow Process Instances of a Specific Process Definition 190 Deactivating a Workflow Process Instance 191 Expiring a Workflow Process Instance 192 Purging a Workflow Process Instance from the Log 192 Activating Fields Used by Workflow Processes 193 Monitoring and Troubleshooting Workflow Processes in Production 193 About Workflow Process Monitoring 193 Setting Workflow Process Monitoring Levels 195 Setting Tracing and Event Log Levels 196 Capturing Data with Siebel Application Response Management (Siebel ARM) 197 Recording Behavior with Siebel Flight Data Recorder (FDR) Files 198 Troubleshooting Workflow Processes in a Production Environment 198 Chapter 10: Workflow Policies About Planning Workflow Policies 203 Planning Workflow Policy Groups 203 Planning Workflow Policies 204 Determining What to Monitor When Planning Policies 205 Planning Policies and Conditions 205 Planning Workflow Policy Actions 206 Scenario for Planning Workflow Policies: Notification for 30%+ Discounts 206 Scenario for Planning Workflow Policies: Notification for Large Number of Open Service Requests 208 Defining a Test and Migration Strategy for Workflow Policies 209 About Creating Workflow Policies 209 About the Workflow Policies Views 210 Defining Workflow Policy Actions 210 About the Actions Applet in the Workflow Policies Action View 211 About the Arguments Applet in the Workflow Policies Action View 211 Using the Send Page Program Type 212 Using the Send Message Program Type 213 Using the Message Broadcast Program Type 214 Using the Run External Programs Type 215 Using the Database Operation Program Type 215 About the Recipients Applet 217 Creating a Workflow Policy Action 218 Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Send Page Action 219 Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Send Email Action with a Repeating Message 220 8 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  9. 9. Contents ■ Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Send Message Broadcast Action 221 Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Database Operation Action 222 Example of a Workflow Policy Action: Creating a Run External Program Action 222 Creating Workflow Policy Groups 224 About the Workflow Groups Applet 225 About the Workflow Policies Applet 225 Creating Workflow Policies 225 About the Policies List Applet 228 About the Conditions Applet 229 About the Actions Applet 233 Example of a Workflow Policy: Creating a Send Page Workflow Policy 234 Example of a Workflow Policy: Creating a Send Email Workflow Policy 234 About Customizing Workflow Policies with Siebel Tools 235 Siebel Tools and Workflow Policies 236 Siebel Tools Definitions in the Workflow Policies Views 237 About Workflow Policy Objects 238 Creating a Workflow Policy Object 238 Workflow Policies and the Siebel Tools Views 239 About the Workflow Policy Column List View 240 Configuring a Workflow Condition Based on a Foreign Key 241 About the Workflow Policy Object List View 242 About the Workflow Policy Component List View 242 About the Workflow Policy Component Columns View 244 Defining a Workflow Policy Column 245 Defining a Workflow Policy Component 246 Defining a Workflow Policy Object 246 Modifying Policy Column Names 247 Adding Policy Columns to a Workflow Policy Object 247 Associating a Column with a Workflow Policy Component 248 About the Validate Tool in Siebel Tools 248 Modifying an Existing Workflow Policy Object 248 About Workflow Policy Programs 251 About the Program List View 252 About the Workflow Policy Program Argument List View 252 Creating a Workflow Policy Program 256 Example of Creating a Workflow Policy Program Argument: Send Opportunity Email 258 Creating SQL Statements for Workflow Policies Program Arguments 258 About Predefined Workflow Policy Programs 259 Example of Using a Predefined Workflow Policy Program: Change SR Close Date to Today 259 Example of Using a Predefined Workflow Policy Program: Change SR Owner 260 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 9
  10. 10. Contents ■ Example of Using a Predefined Workflow Policy Program: Change SR Owner to Manager 261 Example of Using a Predefined Workflow Policy Program: Send Quote Page 262 Making Object Types Available in the Siebel Client 263 About Workflow Policies Server Administration 263 Creating Database Triggers 263 About Database Triggers and Database Administration 265 Running Generate Triggers 266 Running the SQL Script File 267 About Database Triggers and Remote Users 268 Setting Up the Siebel Server for Email Manager 268 Setting Up the Communications Profile to Send Email through Workflow 268 Starting Email Manager 269 Setting Up the Siebel Server for Page Manager 270 Troubleshooting the Email and Page Managers 272 Executing Workflow Policies with Workflow Monitor Agent 273 Using Workflow Monitor Agent 275 Using Workflow Action Agent 281 Starting Workflow Agent Processes Automatically with Siebel Server 283 Deleting Expired Workflow Policies 283 About Workflow Policies and Siebel Server Task Trace Files 285 Viewing Trace Files in Siebel Server Administration 285 Viewing Trace Files in the Siebel Server Log Directory 286 About Tracing and Event Log Levels 286 About Workflow Policies Analysis Charts and Reports 286 Using the Policy Frequency or Trend Analysis Chart 286 Using Workflow Policies Reports 287 About Workflow Policies and Siebel Marketing 287 Using Workflow Policy Programs for Campaign Execution 287 Using the Send Campaign Email Workflow Policy Program 288 Using the Create Email Activity Workflow Policy Program 288 Using the Assign to Campaign Workflow Policy Program 289 Scenario for Creating a Marketing Campaign with Workflow Policies 289 About Testing Workflow Policies 292 Testing New Policies and Monitoring the Results 293 Troubleshooting Workflow Policies 293 Workflow Policies and Tracing 294 Migrating Policies to the Production Environment 294 Predefined Programs 295 10 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  11. 11. Contents ■ Chapter 11: Reference Materials for Siebel Workflow Siebel Workflow Terminology 298 Examples of Creating Workflow Processes 301 Example: Attach an Activity Plan to an Opportunity and Test with the Process Simulator and the Run-time Client 301 Example: Creating a Workflow Process Triggered by a Run-time Event 313 Example: Creating a Service Flow Workflow 316 Example: Run-time Event Workflow with User Interact Step to Navigate the End User to a View 321 Example: Externalize Parameters to be Used by Siebel Workflow 324 Predefined Business Services 328 FINS Data Transfer Utilities Business Service 329 FINS Validator Business Service 329 FINS Dynamic UI Business Service 329 Outbound Communications Manager Business Service 329 Report Business Service 329 Synchronous Assignment Manager Requests Business Service 329 Server Requests Business Service 330 Workflow Utilities Business Service 333 Workflow Administration Service 333 Passing Parameters to and from Workflow and Data Manipulation within Workflows 336 Manipulating Data Within Workflows 336 Passing Parameters to and from Workflow with the Workflow Process Manager Business Service 339 Example Script: Invoking Workflow Programmatically and Constructing an Input Property Set 340 Example Script: Defining Property Sets for the Input Property Set 340 Example Script: Constructing Property Sets 340 Example Script: Assembling Properties and Child Property Sets into the Input Property Set 341 Example Script: Invoking the Workflow Process Manager Business Service and Passing It the Input Property Set 341 Passing Parameters from Workflow to Global Variables (Profile Attributes) 342 Using Expressions with Workflow Processes 342 Using the Timestamp Argument 343 Index Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 11
  12. 12. Contents ■ 12 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  13. 13. 1 What’s New in This Release What’s New in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, Version 8.0 In this release, the title of this guide has been changed to Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide from its previous title of Siebel Business Process Designer Administration Guide. Table 1 lists changes described in this version of the documentation to support release 8.0 of the software. Table 1. New Product Features in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, Version 8.0 Topic Description Multiple-Document Interface Oracle’s Siebel Tools is now a multiple-document interface (MDI) application. This means that when you use Siebel Workflow, you can have multiple object editors open at any given time See Using Siebel Tools. displaying not only workflow processes, but other objects as well. Debug toolbar This toolbar contains buttons that let you access Siebel VB and Siebel eScript debugging tools. The relevant button for See Using Siebel Tools. Siebel Workflow is the Watch button that lets your monitor the contents of program variables in the Variable window when simulating a workflow from Siebel Tools. WF/New Task Editor toolbar In this release, you can use the debug toolbar to publish, activate, revise, and expire workflows/tasks. See Using Siebel Tools. Automatic Revisions Workflow and task configuration options that ensure you are See Using Siebel Tools. working on the most current workflow/task version. Three-way merge for upgrades Siebel Tools now supports three-way merge during upgrades for Workflow objects. This merge makes sure that the See “Upgrading Siebel Workflow” on customer's extensions to these objects carry forward to the page 60. new version. Multi-value Properties Window In this release, the Multi-value Properties Window (MVPW) replaces the list applet in most cases within the Siebel Tools See “About the Multi Value Property side of the Business Process Designer. You use the MVPW to Window” on page 65. view, create, and delete process properties to store data for a workflow process. You can also create, delete, and assign input/output arguments for a process step. The MVPW is context-sensitive; it displays the appropriate set of properties based on the object selected. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 13
  14. 14. What’s New in This Release ■ Table 1. New Product Features in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, Version 8.0 Topic Description State Management Type field In this release, a new feature for Siebel Order Management— setting required for all Web Channel session state management—requires that all workflow processes business services are marked with a setting describing the Object Manager client-session mode when making a request See “Field Descriptions: Workflow to the Siebel server. Processes” on page 66. Because the Workflow engine is a business service, this new For more information on the Web feature means the addition of a new property field, called Channel session state State Management Type, for all workflow processes. By management feature, see Siebel default, this property is set to Stateless. You can set this field Web UI Dynamic Developer Kit to indicate whether a workflow process is stateless or Guide. stateful. Strongly typed integration This is a new data type for defining process properties specifically object data type used by web services. Strongly typed objects allow you more functional scripts and better performance. See “Field Descriptions: Process Properties for Workflows” on page 71. Process Designer naming Siebel Workflow automatically assigns a name and sequence conventions for workflow steps number to each step and connector that you create within a and branches workflow process. The name given is based on the type of step or connector. The sequence number differentiates See “Naming Conventions for instances of the same type of step or connector. Workflow Processes, Steps, Branches, and Process Properties” When a new step of the same type is added to the workflow, on page 77. if there is a gap between the sequence numbers for the type (gaps can be created when steps are deleted), the first sequence number in the first gap interval for the step type will be the sequence assigned to the new step. Pass By Reference feature Subprocess methods tasked with modifying large amounts of data must copy large quantities of data. This can negatively See “Passing Property Sets by impact performance and scalability of these method Reference” on page 96. invocations. Pass By Reference is a feature that allows you to avoid passing large property sets, by passing just a pointer to the property sets. This feature employs a new user property, Business Service User Prop, which is represented by a new child object of the Business Service object. Enhancement to Subprocess Subprocesses now support passing property sets by step reference with a new Workflow Process attribute called Pass By Ref Hierarchy Argument. This attribute specifies whether See “Enabling a Subprocess to subprocesses within the workflow process are enabled for use Support Pass By Reference” on with the Pass By Reference feature. The default setting is page 123. FALSE. 14 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  15. 15. What’s New in This Release ■ Table 1. New Product Features in Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide, Version 8.0 Topic Description New operation types In this release, the following operations were added: Delete, NextRecord, PrevRecord, and QueryBiDirectional. See “Defining a Siebel Operation Step” on page 125. Task step The Task step has been introduced to accommodate the new Siebel Task UI feature in this release, which is integrated with See “About Task Steps” on Siebel Workflow. You use the Task step to launch tasks from page 134. within a workflow process. For information on the new task feature, see Siebel Business Process Framework: Task UI Guide. Improved Process Simulator The Watch window allows you to see object and variable Watch window values during simulation. In this release, if the variable is editable, you can update it in the Watch window to feed a See “About the Process Simulator value to the simulation. and Supported Modes for Simulation” on page 177. Application Deployment ADM is an automated deployment framework that provides a Manager (ADM) enhancements mechanism to migrate enterprise customization data (views, responsibilities, assignment rules, and so on) from one Siebel See “Migrating Workflow Processes application environment to another. from Development to Production” on page 185. In this release, workflow processes and workflow policies are data types newly available for migration through ADM. Using See “Migrating Policies to the ADM, you can perform bulk migration and activation of Production Environment” on workflows, and you can migrate policies in batch as well. page 294. Also see Siebel Application Deployment Manager Guide. Workflow Admin Service Business A new business service that allows you to perform batch Service import/export, deployment, and activation of multiple workflow processes by way of a search specification. See “Migrating Workflow Processes Alternatively, you can perform client-side batch activation from Development to Production” and expiration by way of the File menu in the application. on page 185. New child views in the In the enhanced Workflow Deployment view (Administration - Workflow Deployment view Business Process), administrators can now view the parent- child relationship between a workflow process definition and See “Administering Workflow its run-time records. Processes in the Run-Time Client” on page 188. Administrators can use the multi-select function in the list views to perform activation, deletion, and expiration of workflow processes in batch. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 15
  16. 16. What’s New in This Release ■ 16 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  17. 17. 2 Overview of Siebel Workflow This chapter provides a conceptual overview of Siebel Workflow. Siebel Workflow is a customizable business application that allows you to define, manage, and enforce your business processes— creating process automation within the Siebel application. Siebel Workflow orchestrates the various Siebel process-automation technologies. Workflow processes graphically sequence a series of automation steps that support a process, and they specify inputs and outputs for individual steps and for the process as a whole. Using Siebel Workflow to manage business processes in your organization, you can address such challenges as: ■ Automating escalation of events and notification of appropriate parties ■ Routing and assigning work ■ Processing work ■ Enforcing authorization and transition rules This chapter is organized as follows: ■ “General Principles of Workflow” on page 18 ■ “Understanding the Workflow Processes Module” on page 19 ■ “Understanding the Workflow Policies Module” on page 21 ■ “Workflow Roles” on page 25 Siebel Workflow and Process Automation Siebel Workflow brings together Workflow Processes and all other repository configuration objects, including the Workflow Policies module, for creating a comprehensive workflow design. The process- automation technologies in Siebel include: ■ Workflow Processes. Allows you to define your company’s business processes using a familiar flowcharting interface. A workflow process consists of one or more process steps such as start steps, subprocesses, decision points, and tasks. Workflow Processes is the key technology behind building business processes in the Siebel application. ■ Workflow Policies. Allows you to define policies that can act as triggers to execute a process. A policy consists of conditions and actions. When policy conditions are met, the policy action executes the relevant process. Workflow Policies generates events based on database operations. Workflow Policies is effective for performing simple actions such as sending email, or creating an activity or assignment. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 17
  18. 18. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow ■ Tasks. Allows you to create wizard-like user interfaces with multiple-step, interactive operations that can include branching and decision logic to guide end users through task execution. Siebel Task UI allows navigation both backward and forward within task execution, and allows task execution to be paused and resumed as needed. For more information about Siebel Task UI, see Siebel Business Process Framework: Task UI Guide. ■ Assignment Manager. Expresses rules to assign records to people. Enables assignment of records based on skills, workload, and availability. Supports ownership transitions within a process. For more information on Assignment Manager, see Siebel Assignment Manager Administration Guide. ■ SmartScript. Guides users through data-entry activities. SmartScript is effective for call scripting and includes basic support for transaction-level commits. For more information on SmartScript, see Siebel SmartScript Administration Guide. ■ Activity Template. Provides a pre-defined series of steps to be completed. Activity Template is effective for handling asynchronous/offline work. For more information on Activity Template, see Siebel Applications Administration Guide. ■ State Models. Restricts transition of record status based on a current value and the position of the user. State Models can also enforce directional progression of status, so that, for example, Opportunities move forward but not backward through a pipeline. For more information on State Models, see Siebel Applications Administration Guide. While each of the above technologies provide specific functionality to allow business-process automation in the Siebel application, it is Workflow Processes that orchestrates many of the services the technologies perform. A workflow process orchestrates services either by directly invoking each technology, or by interacting with the other technologies through the Siebel event model. General Principles of Workflow In theory, businesses are managed according to policies and procedures that allow efficiency, quality service, adherence to contractual agreements, and profitability. These policies enforce business processes such as: ■ Allowing that response time objectives are met for customer callbacks and open service requests ■ Specifying review policies for important processes like contracts, quotes, or product shipments ■ Monitoring service requests or opportunities over time In practice, the benefits of policies often are not realized because policies are not consistently enforced. This may be because of the large number of processes or because of the dynamic nature of the information being monitored. The management of important events is central to the enforcement of business workflow. Workflow is the timely management of an event to allow proper handling. For example, service departments have procedures for managing an open service request or making sure that response times are met. A workflow can increase the visibility of these processes within an organization and check that they are correctly handled. 18 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  19. 19. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow Service departments have sets of defined rules that match their policies and service agreements such as: ■ Standards for processing calls. For example, when a Severity 1 call is assigned, the new owner is automatically paged. ■ Contracted service agreements that must be adhered to. For example, customers may purchase a support agreement guaranteeing a callback in two hours and problem resolution in four hours. Sales departments also have rules to enforce desired business practices, such as: ■ Discount authority. If a sales representative quotes a discount exceeding the maximum discount allowed, it requires the approval of the district sales manager or VP of Sales. ■ Pipeline management. Each sales representative manages his or her pipeline to ensure sufficient levels of prospects at each stage of the sales cycle. If an area of the pipeline needs attention, the representative or manager should be alerted. ■ Forecasting accuracy. Opportunities that are forecasted but never closed or forecasts having wide discrepancies with the actual revenue need to be flagged. Understanding the Workflow Processes Module Workflow Processes is the module in Siebel Workflow that you use to create and administer workflow processes. Workflow Processes Configuration Overview Workflow Processes allows you to define your company’s business processes using the Process Designer in Siebel Tools. Hosting the Process Designer in Siebel Tools provides an integrated development environment to configure Workflow along with other Siebel objects. This integrated development environment allows a top-down development framework for building business logic, starting with the creation of a workflow process, then providing pluggable services and data objects that make the process executable. You define a process that consists of process steps such as Start steps, Decision Points, Subprocess steps, or Business Service steps to complete work. Work can be completed with either a predefined business service or a custom business service. Predefined actions include updates to the Siebel database, notifications (such as an email or page), integration messages to external systems, and calls to invoke server tasks. Custom actions can be defined by using Siebel VB or Siebel eScript. Workflow Processes Administration Overview Workflow Processes can vary from a simple process such as entering a product order to a complex process such as managing call center workflow. Complex processes can comprise multiple smaller processes. Workflow Processes are administered through the Administration - Business Process views in the Siebel Client. Instructions for accessing and using the Administration - Business Process views are in Chapter 9, “For Administrators: Administering Workflow Processes.” Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 19
  20. 20. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow Invoking Workflow Processes Workflow processes can be invoked from events in the Siebel application or from external systems. Within the Siebel application, a process can be invoked from a workflow policy, an event (such as an insert of a record or a button click), or a server component. From an external system, processes can be invoked using COM or CORBA. For information on invoking a workflow process, see “About Invoking a Workflow Process” on page 165. Sample Workflow Process Scenario To help you understand how the Workflow Processes module works, see the usage scenario “Scenario: New Service Request”. You can view sample workflow processes in detail by selecting the project Workflow - Samples in Siebel Tools. Scenario: New Service Request Prior to implementing Siebel Call Center, ABC Computing found itself unable to resolve many customer issues in a timely manner. To better track and manage service requests, ABC implements the Service Request module and automates the company’s service-request management process. The goal is to meet a service-level agreement (SLA) commitment by making sure that all newly- logged service requests (SRs) are resolved within a specific amount of time. ABC Computing wants the SRs to be assigned by the system to the best representative based on availability and matching skills. If the SR needs immediate attention, the company wants to notify the owner of the SR. This automation is achieved using Siebel Business Process Designer. When an SR is logged, a workflow process is triggered. The workflow process calls Siebel Assignment Manager to assign the SR to the best available service representative. Based on the severity of the SR, Workflow might then send email notification to the representative, using Siebel Communications Server. Automating this process helps ABC Computing achieve faster turnaround time to resolve SRs and meet the company’s SLA commitment. ABC Computing defines its business process for a new service request with the Process Designer. Figure 1 on page 21 illustrates a diagram of the process as drawn in the Process Designer. The diagram demonstrates the steps and decision points involved when a new service request comes into the organization. The steps and decision points are displayed in the diagram in such a way that the flow of the work is clear. NOTE: The steps explained below are not generic; they refer specifically to the workflow process illustrated in Figure 1 on page 21. Each step is interpreted as follows: ■ Start. This is the start step initiating the process instance. The work item is the new service request. ■ Assign Service Request. This is a subprocess action. The service request is assigned to the appropriate agent based on the assignment rules defined in the Assign Service Request subprocess. ■ Severity. This is a decision step. The service request severity determines the next step in the process instance of the three possible paths: Critical, High, or Medium. 20 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  21. 21. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow ■ Send Email. This is an automated business service action. If the service request priority is critical, an email is sent to the assigned agent. This action calls the Outbound Communications Manager business service. ■ Priority High. This is a Siebel Operation update action. This step updates the service request priority to High. ■ Substatus Assigned. This is a Siebel Operation update action. This step updates the sub status to Assigned. ■ Email Error Activity. This is a Siebel Operation insert action. This action is triggered if an error is returned in the Send Email action. ■ Priority Very High and Dispatch. This is a Siebel Operation update action. This step changes the service request priority to Very High and the substatus to Dispatch. ■ End. This step defines the completion of the process. Figure 1. New Service Request Workflow Process Understanding the Workflow Policies Module The Workflow Policies module allows you to define policies that can act as triggers to execute a workflow process. NOTE: The name Workflow Policies replaces the name Workflow Manager, which was used to refer to the Siebel Business Process automation tool in earlier releases. A policy consists of one or more policy conditions. When the policy conditions are met, the policy action is executed. NOTE: A number of the functions available with Workflow Policies can be supported using Workflow Processes. It is recommended that Workflow Policies be used to define conditions for invoking workflow processes. Use Workflow Processes for defining the actions. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 21
  22. 22. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow Workflow Policies Structure The basic underlying construct of Workflow Policies is the rule. The structure of a rule is: if all conditions are true, then an action occurs. The rule contains a policy condition and a policy action. This means when the conditions of the workflow policy are met, an action is triggered. A workflow policy represents the rules the database monitors. A workflow policy, based on the Workflow Policies rule structure, is composed of conditions and actions. A workflow policy condition is a trigger—a circumstance or situation that causes something to happen. A workflow policy action is an action invoked by a policy condition being fulfilled. You can also have a duration, which is the period of time for which all policy conditions exist for the conditions of the policy to be met. Workflow Policy Conditions A policy condition expresses an object/attribute relationship to a value. For example, a policy condition may target data such as Service Request Severity. The policy condition compares that data to a value, such as 1-Critical. The combination of the data element (Service Request Severity), a comparison operation (=), and the value (1-Critical) make up the policy condition. The fact that a Service Request Severity is 1-Critical may be an issue only if the policy condition remains valid for some extended period of time, such as two hours. If this is the case, a duration can be set for two hours on the workflow policy. The duration becomes part of the policy condition. The policy actions are not executed until the policy conditions are met for the specified duration. Policy actions can also occur when time duration is not set. For example, email is automatically sent to a sales manager each time a sales representative quotes a discount rate exceeding 25 percent on revenue less than $100,000. Policies frequently have more than one condition. All the conditions of the policy must be met before an action can occur. A service request with a severity of 1-High and a duration of two hours may be important only if another comparison is also valid, such as the Service Request Status is Open. The policy condition becomes the combination of these two comparison operations: SR Severity = 1-Critical AND SR Status = Open Siebel Workflow Policies supports only AND linkages between policy conditions, not OR linkages. If you need to monitor the SR Severity to be 1-Critical or 2-High and the SR Status is Open, you can use the IN operand to evaluate the OR of the SR Severity Condition. SR Severity IN (’1-Critical’, ’2-High’) AND SR Status = Open Alternatively, OR linkages can be simulated by creating multiple policies for each key policy condition. The combination of workflow policies will act like an OR linkage. For more discussion on comparisons, see “Using Comparison Values in the Conditions Applet” on page 229. Workflow Policy Actions A workflow policy action contains two parts: the action and the action parameters. An action is a type of request, such as “Send an Urgent Page.” Action parameters are the arguments, such as the name of the recipient of the page and the alphanumeric text transmitted with the page. 22 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  23. 23. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow You can specify several actions for one workflow policy, such as sending a page to one person and an email to another. You can reuse actions in multiple workflow policies. See “About Customizing Workflow Policies with Siebel Tools” on page 235 for a discussion of actions and their parameters. NOTE: In most cases, use workflow policy actions to run a workflow process. Figure 2 illustrates the key parts of a workflow policy. Figure 2. Key Parts of a Workflow Policy Workflow Policy Action Program Types Workflow policy actions are based on underlying predefined programs in Siebel Tools and inherit all the arguments of the program. Workflow policy action programs can be one of the following types: ■ Send Message. A program of this type sends an email to one or more recipients. ■ Send Page. A program of this type sends a page to one or more recipients. ■ Send Message Broadcast. A program of this type inserts a message broadcast for one or more recipients. ■ DB Operation. A program of this type either inserts or updates the data records of a Siebel database table for selected workflow policy components. NOTE: Often, when some data changes, other data must be changed in accordance. This data dependency logic is typically implemented at the Object Manager layer through business component definitions and run-time events. DB operations by workflow policies provide an alternative that works at the database-record level. DB operations should be used only when the data dependency involved centers around database records rather than around business components. For example, use DB operations when one database record must always be updated if another database record is inserted, regardless of which business components the two database records belong to, or whether the two database records belong to any business components at all. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 23
  24. 24. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ General Principles of Workflow ■ External Program. A program of this type allows you to run an executable. ■ Assignment Request. For internal use only. ■ Generic Request Server. A program of this type submits a server request to a designated server component. NOTE: Most functionality included in workflow policy action programs can be executed using Workflow Processes. You can use programs in multiple action definitions and you can use action definitions in multiple workflow policies. “Predefined Programs” on page 295 contains a list of the predefined programs. Workflow Policy Groups Workflow policies are organized into groups. A workflow policy group is a collection of workflow policies to facilitate load balancing on the servers. Workflow policy groups allow you to manage and optimize Workflow Agent process performance by grouping similar policies to run under one Workflow Agent process. Architecture of Workflow Policies The key elements of the Workflow Policies module are workflow policy object creation in Siebel Tools, workflow policy creation in the run-time client, and policy execution by the Siebel Server Workflow Components. The Workflow Policies architecture is illustrated in Figure 3. Figure 3. Architecture of Workflow Policies 24 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  25. 25. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ Workflow Roles Workflow Policies enforces policies at the data layer, through database triggers. When a particular policy’s conditions are met, underlying database triggers capture the database event into a Workflow Policy Manager queuing table (S_ESCL_REQ). A Workflow Policy Manager component (the Workflow Monitor Agent) polls this table and processes requests by taking the actions defined. In some cases, an action defined might be to invoke the Workflow Process Manager. Workflow Policy Manager provides scalability by using an additional component called Workflow Action Agent. Workflow Action Agent can be executed on a different application server within the Siebel Enterprise. Workflow Policies Administration Overview The Workflow Policies module is administered through Siebel Workflow in the run-time client. Instructions for accessing and using the Workflow Policies views are in “About Customizing Workflow Policies with Siebel Tools” on page 235. Workflow Roles The job roles associated with Siebel Workflow are the following: ■ The Business Analyst considers your organization’s business requirements and determines the processes to be automated using the Siebel application. ■ The Workflow Configurator uses Siebel Tools to develop workflow processes and to define objects, business services, and programs. Your organization can use the predefined objects, business services, or programs provided in the application; or, the Workflow Configurator can define customized objects, business services, and programs in Siebel Tools. NOTE: Business services can also be defined in the Siebel client. For more information, see Integration Platform Technologies: Siebel Enterprise Application Integration. ■ The Workflow Administrator monitors workflow processes in the Siebel client using Siebel Workflow. The Workflow Administrator also activates workflow policies by generating database triggers in a script and creating them in the Siebel database. The Workflow Administrator then starts Siebel Server processes that execute workflow processes and policies. This person is typically a system administrator, database administrator, or someone from the Information Services department. ■ The End User uses the system and executes workflow processes and policies. This person is typically an employee of your organization, and can also be a customer. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 25
  26. 26. Overview of Siebel Workflow ■ Workflow Roles 26 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  27. 27. 3 Introduction to Workflow Processes Siebel Workflow is an interactive software tool that lets you automate how your organization handles workflow processes. It uses as its basic model the same processes that organizations use in their sales, marketing, and service departments that determine business workflow. You can use Siebel Workflow to promote consistency and adherence to processes through the automatic enforcement of business policies and procedures. The Siebel Workflow product provides a graphical user interface featuring a familiar flowcharting methodology for designing workflow processes. This chapter is organized as follows: ■ “Overview of the Workflow Architecture” on page 27 ■ “Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle” on page 28 ■ “Design-Time Architecture of Workflow” on page 43 ■ “Simulation Architecture of Workflow” on page 45 ■ “Deployment Architecture of Workflow” on page 46 ■ “Run-Time Architecture of Workflow” on page 47 ■ “Workflow Interaction with Other Siebel Components” on page 52 Overview of the Workflow Architecture Siebel Workflow works with all Siebel Business Applications and involves the following architectural components: ■ Siebel Tools. Siebel Tools is an integrated environment for configuring all aspects of a Siebel application. The Workflow Process Designer resides in Siebel Tools. You use the Process Designer to build your workflow processes. ■ Siebel Client. Workflow Processes and Workflow Policies are administered through the Administration - Business Process views in the Siebel client (Mobile Web Client). ■ Siebel Server. Siebel Server manages the Siebel Workflow components that automate business policies. ■ Siebel Database. A relational database containing the set of data that Workflow Policies act against. For a complete description of the Siebel Server architecture, refer to Siebel System Administration Guide. Siebel Tools provides the design interface and the debugging interface of Siebel Workflow. After workflow processes are designed and debugged, they are written to repository tables for deployment from the administrative interface in the run-time client. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 27
  28. 28. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Figure 4 depicts the development and deployment lifecycle for a workflow process. NOTE: While the lifecycle shown is a linear flow, the typical development cycle of a workflow process is iterative. Figure 4. Development and Deployment Lifecycle of Workflow Processes The development and deployment steps shown in Figure 4 are covered in greater detail in the following topics: ■ “Analyzing Process Requirements” on page 28 ■ “Defining Workflows” on page 31 ■ “Identifying and Building Exception Handling” on page 37 ■ “Testing and Troubleshooting Workflows” on page 39 ■ “Migrating Workflows to Production” on page 40 ■ “Monitoring Workflow Execution” on page 42 Analyzing Process Requirements The first part of a workflow’s development entails analysis of your business requirements and the rules and processes to be automated. 28 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  29. 29. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle An implementation project team typically spends a fair amount of time on requirements analysis. It is not unusual for this to be about 30% of the of the total implementation time. A Business Analyst defines the processes to be automated using the Siebel application. A developer (the Workflow Configurator) reviews these processes. When making design decisions on how to implement the processes, the Workflow Configurator looks for the following areas as candidates to be implemented using Siebel Workflow: ■ Repetitive, manual processing ■ Need for timely processing of an event ■ Escalations and notifications When making implementation decisions about automating processes, a Workflow configurator should consider the options summarized in Table 2. Table 2. Using Siebel Workflow for Automation Versus Using Other Siebel Mechanisms Framework Key Advantages Limitations Workflow Processes ■ Visual representation of The semantics for control are not as rich business logic is as with scripting. Specific limitations relatively simple to include: understand and ■ Limited control of flow for maintain. iteration through record sets ■ Remote synchronous ■ Limited direct access to object and asynchronous methods execution enable broad horizontal scalability and long-running transactions. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 29
  30. 30. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Table 2. Using Siebel Workflow for Automation Versus Using Other Siebel Mechanisms Framework Key Advantages Limitations Workflow Policies ■ Policies respond to ■ Changes to policies may require database events database downtime to implement. regardless of whether ■ Policies are more difficult to they are initiated by an configure that other alternatives. Object Manager component or by a non- ■ Policies allow a limited range of Object Manager executable actions. component. ■ Policies may get higher transaction throughput on a given set of hardware for simple transactions. Siebel Script ■ Script is familiar to most Widespread scripting degrades: developers. ■ Ease of maintenance ■ Script provides a ■ Ease of upgrade complete set of semantics. ■ Performance ■ Script is highly flexible. When Workflow Policies Offers a Better Automation Choice than Workflow Processes When deciding whether to implement a workflow policy versus a workflow process there are some additional things you may want to consider, such as: ■ whether the data and business logic involved are at the data layer or the business logic layer of the Siebel architecture ■ which features your automation will need to implement. Workflow Process Manager and run-time events capture business-layer logic. Workflow Policy Manager captures data-layer logic. Data coming into Siebel via the data layer—for example EIM or MQ channels—cannot be captured via the business layer. This typically presents a good candidate for a workflow policy. Some features not supported by workflow processes—such as email consolidation, duration, and quantity—are also candidates for workflow policies. Workflow processes, however, provide a better platform for development and deployment, complex comparison logic, and flow management (IF, THEN, ELSE, or CASE). Workflows can invoke business services. Workflows provide pause, stop, and error-handling capabilities. Workflow Policy Manager is the better alternative in scenarios such as a case when bulk data uploads happen using EIM, or during Data Quality cleaning in the data layer. 30 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  31. 31. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle For more information on Workflow Policies, see Chapter 10, “Workflow Policies”. For more detail on analyzing requirements for process automation, see Chapter 4, “Planning Workflow Processes.” Defining Workflows With Siebel Workflow, the run-time engine manages process flow, application flow, and integration flow. Basic constructs such as Start/Wait/End steps, Decision Points, Subprocesses, and Connectors are available to define your workflow processes. (For details on how to implement each of these constructs, see Chapter 6, “For Developers: Workflow Process Steps.”) The key elements of run-time execution are: ■ Events. Workflow processes can be invoked from events in the Siebel application or in external systems. Events can pass context from the caller—a user session, for example—to a workflow process using a row-id. ■ Rules. The flow control for a workflow process is determined by decision rules. Rules can be based on business component data or on local variables known as process properties. Rule expressions are defined using Siebel Query Language. ■ Actions. Workflow process actions can perform database record operations, they can invoke business services, and they can cause a pause in the workflow process. ■ Data. Data is created or updated as the workflow process executes. There are three main types of data a workflow process operates on: ■ Business component data ■ Process properties ■ Siebel Common Object data. Think of process properties as local variables that are active during the workflow process. The variables are used as inputs and outputs to the various steps in a process. With every workflow process, there is a set of predefined process properties that are automatically generated when you define the workflow. One example of these predefined process properties is the Process Instance Id. For more information on process properties, see “About Process Properties” on page 93. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 31
  32. 32. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Some of the basic constructs of Siebel Workflow are shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Basic Constructs of Siebel Workflow Events Using events is one of three main ways to invoke a workflow process. The other two invocation mechanisms are Workflow Policies and Tools object events (script). For more information on workflow invocation mechanisms, see “Invocation Mechanisms” on page 49. 32 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  33. 33. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Rules There are several ways to implement decision rules in a workflow process. Table 3 describes the main ways and discusses their usefulness and limitations. Table 3. Ways to Implement Rules in Workflow Processes for Enforcing Business Logic Type Description When Useful Limitations Workflow A step in a workflow that When you need a Conditional Decision Point arbitrates between one or simple articulation of expressions lack more alternative branches in whether one or more support for some key the flow. alternative actions in operators including: flow should be taken. Each branch out of a ■ AND decision step has one or ■ OR more conditions. If all evaluate to TRUE for the ■ Order of branch, the flow continues precedence down that branch. control (that is, parentheses) Scripted Script within a business When Workflow Undermines the Business Service service action step that decision point readability and evaluates a potentially semantics are not simplicity of the complex set of inputs and sufficiently expressive workflow by hiding returns a simplified output to encapsulate logic within a business that can be evaluated by a decision criteria. service. workflow decision point. Other Other rule frameworks that When it is deemed Limitations vary Specialized Rule may be used directly or appropriate to use a depending on the rule Frameworks indirectly by a workflow, specialized rule framework used. such as personalization framework, such as rules, assignment rules, EAI when you need to Dispatch Service, or the assign work to people Siebel rules engine that is based on their new in this release. workload. The Siebel rules engine allows you to maintain business process logic declaratively and in a location external to your Siebel applications. For information on implementing rules in Siebel Workflow, see Siebel Business Rules Administration Guide. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 33
  34. 34. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Decision Points Decision points exit with multiple branches. For each branch, a conditional statement is evaluated. A conditional statement compares any two of the following: ■ process properties ■ business component fields ■ literal values The terms of comparison include: ■ two values are equivalent ■ one value exists among a series of others (for example, child record values, One Must Match, or All Must Match ■ Greater Than (>) or Less Than (<) ■ Between or Not Between ■ Null or Not Null For an example of a Compose Condition Criteria dialog box showing decision criteria, see Figure 23 on page 105. For descriptions of the fields in the Compose Condition Criteria dialog box, see Table 11 on page 106. 34 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  35. 35. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Actions There are several ways to effect actions in a workflow. With a workflow process action, data is taken as an input, then a transformation takes place, and data is produced as output. Table 4 shows the main ways to cause various transformations, and describes their usefulness and limitations. Table 4. Actions in Siebel Workflow Action Type Description When Useful Limitations Business Service A workflow step that invokes When you need Creating and destroying Step a method of a business to execute a business services can be service. potentially expensive. Overhead can be complex, but reduced through caching. The business service may be reusable set of a prebuilt Siebel service or a Incorporating too much logic logic. scripted business service. within a business service may limit its reusability and the transparency of the workflow. Database A workflow step that When you need While it is possible to update Operation performs inserts, updates, to execute multiple records based on a (Siebel and queries against Siebel simple record search specification, it is not Operation Step) business components. operations within possible to retrieve and the workflow. iterate through a set of records such that subsequent workflow actions can execute for each record. Wait Step A workflow step that puts When you need The releasing event must be the workflow into a holding to support time- triggered through the Object pattern until a releasing based Manager. event is fired or a timeout escalations or occurs. long-running flows that may last for days or weeks (for example, waiting for a customer response) Business Service Step Business Service steps execute predefined or custom methods. Typical predefined business services used include Assignment Manager requests, notification through the Communications Server, server requests, and integration requests (from Siebel EAI). Custom business services can be written in Siebel VB or eScript. When defining a Business Service step, you must specify the business service, the business service method, input arguments (pass in a process property, business component data, or a literal value) and output arguments. Some commonly used business services for workflow processes include: Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 35
  36. 36. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle ■ FINS Data Transfer Utilities ■ FINS Validator ■ FINS Dynamic UI ■ Outbound Communications Manager ■ Report Business Service ■ Synchronous Assignment Manager Requests ■ Server Requests ■ Business Rule Service ■ Audit Trail Engine ■ EAI business services (such as EAI Siebel Adapter, EAI XML Converter, and so on) For more information on these business services, see “Predefined Business Services” on page 328. Siebel Operation Step Siebel Operation steps allow you to perform database operations of Insert, Update, Query, Delete, NextRecord, PreviousRecord, and QueryBiDirectional. These steps are performed on business components. Once you have defined the Siebel Operation step, you can use the Search Specification child object to locate the records you want to work on. Examples of Siebel Operations steps include creating an Activity record when a new SR is opened, or updating a comment field if an SR has been open too long. Wait Step Wait steps allow you to suspend workflow process execution for a specified period of time or until a specific event occurs. Figure 6 shows the definition of a timeout based on time defined as literal values in input arguments. Figure 6. Example Wait Step Definition About Developing Workflow Processes in Siebel Tools You develop workflow processes in Siebel Tools, on a local database. Siebel Workflow is a repository object. A workflow belongs to a project. 36 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  37. 37. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Though compiling a Siebel Repository File is a standard practice for other repository objects, Siebel Workflow has its own deployment mechanism. You do not compile a SRF after you have developed workflow processes. For more information on Workflow deployment, see “About Deploying Workflow Processes” on page 181. Siebel Workflow does not participate in the behaviors that follow, though these behaviors are standard for other repository objects. ■ Merge. Siebel Workflow does not participate in three-way merge. When workflow definitions are imported into the repository, they maintain versioning provided by Siebel Workflow. ■ Object Comparison. This is disabled in this release. ■ Archive. Workflows do not participate in .sif archive. Instead, workflows can be archived as XML files using the Workflow export utility. Typically, developers use a local database to develop workflows. When using a local database, you must check out workflow definitions from the master repository. When developing workflows on a local database, the local database must have all the referenced data objects. For those data objects that are not docked and hence not packaged as part of the database extract, developers must import them into the local database. The following objects are not docked and are referenced by Workflow: ■ Data maps. To import data maps to the local database, you use the dedicated client connected to the local database, and the client-side import utility. ■ Message tables. You can copy message tables over to the local database. Alternatively, you can define messages using the unbounded picklist. While this allows for the creation of messages, it does not check the validity of the message at definition time. If you choose, you can also develop or modify workflows using Siebel Tools connected to the development database, by locking the project in the master repository. This way, you do not need to make sure that all the lists of values are made available to the local database. Identifying and Building Exception Handling An exception represents a deviation from the normal processing flow: an error. An exception can be a system error or a user-defined error. You can use exception handling to notify the user of an error and terminate the workflow process instance. There are three ways of handling exceptions: ■ Using a Stop step ■ Using Exception branches ■ Using a universal exception handler Using a Stop Step Use a Stop step to show a particular error message while processing. Examples for use include real- time processing for credit card authorization or for order validation. This type of exception handler provides customizable error messages including expressions. For more information on Stop steps, see “About Stop Steps” on page 137. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 37
  38. 38. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Using Exception Branches You can programmatically handle errors and change the flow depending on when errors are encountered. You do this using Exception branches. This provides a granular approach to handling exceptions at each step. In the example shown in Figure 7, when the Get Organization ID step is unable to get data, the workflow is programmed to continue to the Lookup Sender by Org step and if this fails, to take the red Exception branch and send an email (the Send Lookup Error Email step). Figure 7. Example of a Workflow That Uses Exception Branches to Programmatically Handle Exceptions For more information on handling exceptions with Exception branches, see “Using Exceptions to Handle Errors” on page 163. Using a Universal Exception Handler You can define a universal exception handler at the workflow level by setting Error Process Name on the workflow to be used as the error process.This error process workflow is then invoked for any exception that happens on the workflow attached to it. Use a universal exception handler when you need a uniform exception handler across multiple steps in a workflow or across multiple workflows. This type of exception handling also helps to reduce clutter on the workflow diagram itself. For more information on using error processes as uniform exception handlers, see “Using Error Processes to Handle Errors” on page 161. 38 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  39. 39. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle Testing and Troubleshooting Workflows There are two ways of testing and troubleshooting a workflow: simulating the workflow, and using event logs. Simulating Workflows Two simulators allow you to simulate workflows: Process Simulator. Most workflows can be tested and debugged using the Process Simulator, which is hosted in Siebel Tools. To use the simulator, you need to have the Siebel mobile client installed. The mobile client can connect to any database (that is, either development or local) that has the test data required to debug a workflow. In this release, you can test interactive workflows and runtime-event-based workflows using the Process Simulator. Long-running workflows and those workflows that invoke server components cannot be debugged using the Process Simulator. During the debugging, the process variables are displayed by the dynamic watch window. Business Service Simulator. Workflow can be run as a business service from the Business Service Simulator in the Siebel client. The workflows must be published and activated before testing them with the Business Service simulator. To use the simulator, the following conditions must first be met: ■ Siebel Mobile Client installed ■ Workflows exported from Siebel Tools ■ Workflows imported by way of the client NOTE: Alternatively, you can publish and activate to the Mobile Web Client directly from Siebel Tools. Use the Business Service simulator when you need to debug script in conjunction with a workflow. Set breakpoints in the script and execute the workflow in the mobile client. When the workflow executes a service for which a breakpoint is set, control is returned to the Script Debugger in Siebel Tools. Using Event Logs For more detailed information on the execution of a workflow, set event logs so that you can view the log files. NOTE: This method is useful if you cannot perform real-time debugging or do not have the Process Simulator readily available. However, use of this method may result in large log files that must be analyzed. For information on using the Log File Analyzer, see Siebel System Monitoring and Diagnostics Guide. Events used for logging are as follows: ■ Workflow Engine Invoked (EngInv). Traces methods invoked and arguments passed to the Workflow engine. ■ Workflow Definition Loading (DfnLoad). Traces process and step definitions loaded into memory. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 39
  40. 40. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle ■ Workflow Process Execution (PrcExec). Traces process instance creation and completion. Traces the process property get/set. ■ Workflow Step Execution (StpExec). Traces step creation and completion, branch condition evaluation, business service invocation, and business component insert/update. ■ Workflow Performance (WfPerf). Traces process and step execution time, as well as overall process execution time. ■ Workflow Recovery (WfRecv). Traces instance recovery status and progress, as well as instance recovery details. (Applicable only to the Workflow Recovery Manager server component). For information on how to set event log levels, see “Setting Tracing and Event Log Levels” on page 196. Migrating Workflows to Production Once you have tested your workflows, they are ready to be migrated. Workflow definitions can be migrated across environments—for example, from development to production—using one of three migration utilities: ■ Application Deployment Manager (ADM). ADM automates the process of migrating enterprise customization data (views, responsibilities, assignment rules, workflow processes, workflow policies, and so on) from one Siebel application environment to another, including from a development environment to a testing environment. ■ Repository Import/Export Utility (REPIMPEXP). This utility allows export/import of all repository objects. This utility is best used to migrate all repository objects including your workflows when your organization is ready to roll out the release (that is, migrate all repository objects). ■ Workflow Import/Export Utility (Import/Export). This utility allows incremental migration of workflow definitions. Using Siebel Tools, you export the workflow from one environment and import the workflow to another environment. Import of workflows can be done in one of the following ways: 40 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  41. 41. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle ■ Using Siebel Tools for importing workflows. Using Siebel Tools, you import the definitions into the repository of the target environment, then you mark the workflows for deployment by clicking the Publish button. After this, the definitions are ready to be activated. This approach makes sure that the versions of the workflow definitions that exist in the repository tables and the run-time tables are the same. Figure 8 shows an incremental deployment using the Import/Export utility and Siebel Tools. Figure 8. Incremental Deployment Using Import/Export ■ Using the Siebel client for importing workflows. You can import the workflow definitions directly into the run-time tables. From your point of view, this approach bypasses the steps of writing the definitions into the repository tables of the target environment and activation from the Siebel client (although these steps are still performed behind the scenes by the Workflow engine). This approach causes the latest version of the workflow definition in the run-time tables (used by the Workflow engine) to be different from the version that resides in the repository tables. NOTE: This approach is a good one for testing a workflow in a different environment, but as a best practice, it should not be used for general migration of workflows across environments. Figure 9 shows an incremental deployment using Import/Export to export from Siebel Tools and import from the Siebel client. Figure 9. Incremental Deployment Using Import/Export to Export from Siebel Tools and Import from the Siebel Client Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 41
  42. 42. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Workflow Processes Development Lifecycle For more information on migration utilities, see “Migrating Workflow Processes from Development to Production” on page 185. Deploying Workflows in Production After migrating your workflows to a production environment, you may need to deploy them (publish them) before you can run them. Whether or not you must deploy them depends on which migration tools you used. Deployment of workflows happens as follows: ■ ADM automatically deploys all migrated workflows. If you have used ADM to migrate your workflows to production, you do not manually deploy them. ■ If you have used REPIMPEXP or Import/Export to migrate your workflows to production, you must manually deploy the workflows. Manual Deployment of Workflows You can publish workflows—that is, deploy them—manually from within Siebel Tools, or from within the run-time client. To deploy workflows manually in Siebel Tools, you use the Publish button or the Publish/Activate button found in the WF/Task Editor toolbar. Using the Publish/Activate button, you can both deploy and activate a workflow process with one click. If you choose to publish a workflow but not activate it, you can still use the run-time client to activate the workflow with the Activate button in the Workflow Deployment view. NOTE: In this release, deployment of workflows takes place using buttons in Siebel Tools called “Publish” and “Publish/Activate.” In earlier releases, the terminology on this button action was called “Deploy.” In earlier releases, activation could only take place in the run-time client. In this release, you can activate a workflow in Siebel Tools, given you have set the VerCheckTime parameter in the Workflow section of the .cfg file to -1 ([Workflow] VerCheckTime = -1). When you click either the Publish button or the Publish/Activate button, the workflow process is validated before it is deployed (published). If there are any validation errors for the workflow, a dialog box appears, giving you the opportunity to correct any errors before deployment (publishing). This dialog box is modeless, meaning that you may keep it open to see the error messages while working on the workflow using the Process Designer to correct the problems reported. However, you can proceed with the deployment despite problems (validation errors) if you choose to do so. If there are no validation errors, you do not see this dialog box, nor do you see a message stating that the validation was successful. The validation is carried out without user visibility, unless errors are detected. Monitoring Workflow Execution You monitor and control workflow process execution in the Administration - Business Process views of the run-time client. You can monitor and troubleshoot Siebel Workflow in the production environment considering progress and status information, operation details, performance- measurement data, and failure-analysis records. 42 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  43. 43. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Design-Time Architecture of Workflow For more information, see “Monitoring and Troubleshooting Workflow Processes in Production” on page 193. Design-Time Architecture of Workflow Workflow components and definitions are defined as Siebel Tools objects and are stored in the Siebel Tools repository. Before you can run a workflow process as a server task or from the Siebel Web Client, you must first publish the workflow process from Siebel Tools, then activate the workflow process from the Siebel Web Client. NOTE: If you use the Publish/Activate button (rather than the Publish button) to publish the workflow process in Siebel Tools, there is no need to separately activate the workflow in the run-time application. The Workflow Process repository object is a top-level object in the Object Explorer of Siebel Tools. You use the Object List Editor (OBLE) to create Workflow processes. Workflow processes belong to a project. There is no SRF compile required for deployment of workflow processes. There is no merge required. There is independent versioning of workflow processes in Siebel Tools and in the run-time client. Configuration data is available at design time, but run-time data is not available at design time. You use process properties to create workflow definitions, or alternatively, you can enter data through unbounded picklists. The following Siebel Tools features are not applicable to Workflow objects: ■ SIF export and import ■ Object Compare ■ Three-way merge during upgrades Because Siebel Tools excludes Workflow objects from these features, it is important to use the Workflow import and export feature for backing up and restoring workflow definitions. For example, if you archive a project in Siebel Tools, the Workflow objects within that project are not archived. CAUTION: If you delete all the objects from a project expecting that they can be restored from the SIF, it is important to keep in mind that Workflow objects are an exception, and cannot be restored from the SIF. Use the Workflow import and export feature to back up and restore workflow definitions. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 43
  44. 44. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Design-Time Architecture of Workflow Use the Process Designer in Siebel Tools to develop workflow processes. Workflow processes are stored in the Siebel system in the repository and runtime tables. When you edit the processes in Siebel Tools, they are stored in the repository tables. When you publish and activate the processes, they are also inserted into the runtime tables. Figure 10 shows the design-time architecture of Workflow. Figure 10. Design-time Architecture of Siebel Workflow Figure 10 shows the following points: ■ Workflow processes in development are stored in the Siebel repository as repository tables and runtime tables ■ There are two methods of exporting workflow processes from the Process Designer in Siebel Tools as files: ■ As a workflow process file (.xml) ■ As a Siebel archived file (.sif) NOTE: Although not shown in Figure 10, you can also use ADM to migrate workflow processes from one Siebel environment to another. For more information about ADM, see Siebel Application Deployment Manager Guide. 44 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  45. 45. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Simulation Architecture of Workflow Simulation Architecture of Workflow After designing your workflow processes, you test them using the Process Simulator. Testing your workflow processes before migrating them to your production environment verifies that resulting actions are accurate and useful and the results are exactly what you want. Figure 11 shows the simulation architecture of Workflow. Figure 11. Simulation Architecture of Siebel Workflow Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 45
  46. 46. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Deployment Architecture of Workflow Deployment Architecture of Workflow After designing your workflow processes and testing them, it is time for deployment. Figure 12 shows the relationship of Siebel Tools and the run-time client in the deploying of workflow processes. Figure 12. Deployment of Workflow Processes Figure 12 illustrates that workflow definitions are read from the repository, then when a workflow is activated, its definitions are written to run-time tables. 46 Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0
  47. 47. Introduction to Workflow Processes ■ Run-Time Architecture of Workflow Run-Time Architecture of Workflow The Workflow run-time architecture is based on the Siebel Object Manager layer and the server infrastructure layer of the Siebel Business applications architecture. The run-time environment is available both as a business service and as a server component. The run-time architecture supports three invocation modes for invoking and resuming workflow processes: Local Synchronous, Remote Synchronous, and Remote Asynchronous. Figure 13 shows the run-time architecture of Workflow. Figure 13. Run-time Architecture of Workflow Workflow Process Types Siebel Workflow has four types of workflow processes that characterize run-time behavior. The processing type is set in the Workflow Processes list editor of Siebel Tools, using the Workflow Mode field. The workflow process types are as follows: ■ 7.0 Flow. A 7.0 workflow process provides backward compatibility for existing Siebel 7 (pre-7.7) workflows. For more information, see “About 7.0 Workflow Processes” on page 143. ■ Long Running Flow. A long-running workflow process is a persistent workflow that can last for hours, days, or months. For more information, see “About Long-Running Workflow Processes” on page 143. ■ Interactive Flow. An interactive workflow process navigates the user across Siebel views. For more information, see “About Interactive Workflow Processes” on page 144. ■ Service Flow. A service workflow process executes a set of operations upon event invocation. For more information, see “About Service Workflow Processes” on page 144. Siebel Business Process Framework: Workflow Guide Version 8.0 47

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