Annual Report, REAP
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Annual Report, REAP

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This 2009 Annual Report provides program design and impact, social mobilization strategies, and energy and carbon data analysis for Boulder County\’s Residential Energy Action Program (REAP).

This 2009 Annual Report provides program design and impact, social mobilization strategies, and energy and carbon data analysis for Boulder County\’s Residential Energy Action Program (REAP).

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  • 1. 2009 REAP Annual Report March 8, 2010 Prepared by JC Martel Residential Energy Action Program Manager Center for ReSource Conservation 2639 Spruce Street Boulder, Colorado 80302 CONSERVATION STARTS HERE2639 Spruce Street ♦ Boulder, Colorado 80302 ♦ 303.999.3820 ♦ 303.440.0703 fax www.ConservationCenter.org ♦ www.ReSourceYard.org
  • 2. www.conservationcenter.org Executive Summary Since its inception, the REAP Program has assisted in market transformation. It began with subsidized audits. Boulder’s audit program grew the audit market to a point of saturation with a countywide education and awareness campaign coupled with financial incentives. The post audit consulting service, now branded the Residential Energy Action Program (REAP), that the residential audit program transitioned into in 2009 has been driving the private market to evolve as well. In addition, private companies are integrating a REAP consulting model into contractor and consulting businesses. The program has succeeded in reaching its goal of energy education for Boulder County residents. Some of the key accomplishments from the 2009 program include: The 2009 program delivered:  direct outreach to 924 homeowners  465 energy audits, and  269 action consultations. Top 3 program elements most valued services of REAP to homeowners: 1. Personalized Home Energy Action Plan 2. One-on-one energy counseling 3. Subsidized energy audit Energy Audits:  Out of 2657 Xcel Energy audits completed in Xcel’s Colorado territory, 30% were done in Boulder County, or 798 audits.  88% of Xcel audits completed in Boulder County included infrared, 76% included blower door, and 12% were clipboard audits. Action Program: Carbon Savings Assumptions for 98 Homes in the Action Program Aggregate 504,859 lbs Aggregate 229 mtCO2e Carbon Savings Assumptions for 269 Homes in the Action Program Aggregate 138,6708 lbs Aggregate 629 mtCO2e Carbon Savings Assumptions for 1700 Homes Projected Aggregate 8,770,300 lbs Aggregate 3,978 mtCO2e  63% of homes reduced their greenhouse gas emissions.  79% - 91% had made home improvements as a result of the action program.  Investment average of $7,185 per home.  Averages of 4 energy upgrades were made per home. Page 3 of 27
  • 3. www.conservationcenter.org Table of Contents REAP Overview ............................................................................................................. 5 REAP Impact ................................................................................................................. 8 REAP Program Overview ............................................................................................ 8 Energy Audits .............................................................................................................. 9 Action Program .......................................................................................................... 10 Symbiotic POOH Utility Bill Analysis .......................................................................... 15 Customer Satisfaction ............................................................................................... 18 Marketing and Outreach ............................................................................................ 20 Social Mobilization ..................................................................................................... 23 2010 REAP Outlook..................................................................................................... 25 Appendices ................................................................................................................. 28 Page 4 of 27
  • 4. www.conservationcenter.org REAP Overview The Energy Division’s REAP program began as a pilot energy audit program in 2006. The Residential Energy Audit Program was a subsidized energy audit program that subcontracted professional energy auditors to conduct energy audits that included collection and analysis of utility data from each client, a home visit and audit report. Over 1,700 audits were conducted during those 2 ½ years. However, it became apparent that an audit did not necessarily lead to action. And if it did, the program did not involve post audit implementation data tracking; therefore post-audit implementation achievements from REAP were not calculable until the close of 2009. The consequence of lacking post-audit implementation data has been a negative reputation for energy audit programs in both the residential and commercial sectors. In reality, one could argue that 100% of homeowners during or after an energy audit do something. It can be argued that while auditors do not typically retrofit the home at the time of the audit, an auditor educates the client to strategically open or close blinds to maximize passive solar gain, reminds the homeowner to turn off power strips, and urges the homeowner to move furniture away from vents for proper heat distribution. Additionally, energy efficiency often becomes incorporated into home improvement projects when it otherwise may not be, such as in a bathroom or kitchen remodel, or building an addition. The program changed to address this gap in post audit tracking in 2009. In February 2009, Xcel Energy launched its own subsidized audit program, so the CRC evolved the REAP program from an audit program to an action program. This included working in partnership with Xcel to offer their subsidized audit and contacting each homeowner about their plan to implement the recommended energy efficiency improvements. Based on the homeowner’s action plan, REAP staff recommend contractors, review project bids, and ensure that the projects qualify for the maximum amount of financial incentives. Figure 1 give a visual representation of REAP’s flow process. Page 5 of 27
  • 5. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 1. Flow Process The Action Program was born out of community demand for an unbiased assistance program beyond the audit, and a local government need for post audit data tracking. REAP still promotes homeowners to start with an energy audit for a full-home analysis that can then be reviewed by an energy consultant at our Boulder-based nonprofit. The consultant helps the homeowner develop an action plan, and then reviews contractor’s estimates to ensure that the projects will qualify for the maximum amount of financial incentives. REAP provides energy reduction monitoring so that the homeowner and program oversight can confirm that the projects are successful in achieving greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Energy consultations fall into a tiered system, the services include the following:  one-on-one interaction with the homeowner to discuss retrofit options,  estimated cost and greenhouse gas summaries,  contractor referrals, and  financing information. Page 6 of 27
  • 6. www.conservationcenter.org The program tiers, bronze, silver and gold, refer to how many times the homeowner receives the above mentioned services. Figure 2 outlines the program outcomes for the 2009 program:  direct outreach to 924 homeowners,  465 energy audits, and  269 action consultations. Figure 2. 2009 Residential Energy Action Program Results 1000 800 600 2009 YTD 400 2009 Goal 200 0 Outreach Consultations Xcel Audits Non-Xcel Audits 2009 YTD 924 269 465 20 2009 Goal 0 220 390 87 Figure 3 displays a visual representation of REAP. Figure 1. Page 7 of 27
  • 7. www.conservationcenter.org REAP Impact REAP Program Review The REAP program: 1) provides a subcontracted energy audit to indicate cost-effective energy conservation gains that can be achieved in individual homes (audit); and 2) provides one-on- one interaction with homeowners to discuss the recommendations (action). After a year of implementing the new REAP (Action Program), the CRC estimates that many homeowners will use the program’s services for up to four years after their energy audit, as homeowners use REAP as a revolving service. Many enter the program with plans to make one or two upgrades within the first year after the audit and then the program prompts homeowners to chart additional upgrades beyond their original plan. A key value of REAP is its variety of program offerings that are available to meet any homeowner’s needs. REAP staff analyze each component of a homeowner’s project to offer suggestions for energy Figure 2. Evaluating the Program’s Usefulness efficiency integration. Figure 3 shows the program Which Three did you Find Most Useful? offerings in REAP that a sample size of homeowners Facilitate bulk purchasing valued most. Educational seminars and training Energy reduction monitoring As a homeowner ClimateSmart Loan Program information commented, “I would likely Federal tax incentive information still have done the insulation Assistance with rebate forms and some solar work, but Review of contractors estimates without knowing about it I would likely have not done Contractor referrals in a trade alley network some of the smaller, more Subsidized energy audit effective stuff like putting on A personalized Home Energy Action Plan a storm door or air sealing.” One-on-one energy counseling 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 Sample REAP energy counseling scenarios:  If a homeowner only wants to spend $400 on energy upgrades, an action consultation and utility analysis such as a GH Tracker report can best leverage that homeowner’s investment.  Another homeowner might wish to spend $100,000. They can start with an energy audit, receive a utility analysis report, and numerous consultations to help them retrofit each system of their home. After such a large investment, this homeowner might value from a post-retrofit audit to confirm a healthy air exchange level and an additional utility analysis to measure the impact of their retrofit. Page 8 of 27
  • 8. www.conservationcenter.org Energy Audits 2009 Goal: 390 energy audits 2009 Actual: 465 energy audits Homeowners who contacted the CRC for an energy audit were seamlessly connected to the Xcel program for an audit or were provided a Boulder County or Longmont Power and Communications subsidized audit. Figure 4 gives a breakdown of 2009 audits by location. Out of 2657 Xcel Energy audits completed in Xcel’s Colorado territory, 30% were done in Boulder County, or 798 Figure 3. Xcel Audits audits. 88% of Xcel audits completed in Boulder County included infrared, Xcel Audits 76% included blower door, 200 186 and 12% were clipboard 180 audits. Five Home Boulder 160 Performance with Energy 140 136 Longmont Star (HPwES) projects 120 were completed in Boulder 100 Superior 69 County in 2009 whereas 50 80 Louisville 49 HPwES assessments were 60 25 completed in Xcel’s 40 Boulder County: Unincorporated and NonParticipating Cities Colorado territory. 20 0 Prior to the commencement of the Xcel Energy audit program, the CRC conducted a limited number of REAP audits to homeowners who were on the waiting list for an extended period of time. Figure 5 shows the Figure 4. Non/Pre Xcel Audits breakdown of non- Xcel/pre-Xcel audits. Non-Xcel/Pre-Xcel Audits These audits were 12 conducted in January and 10 February of 2009 and were 10 Boulder billed to the cities and Boulder County at rate of 8 Longmont $150/each. In addition, 6 5 audits in non-Xcel Superior territories were continued. 4 3 Boulder County: Unincorporated 2 and NonParticipating Cities 2 0 Page 9 of 27
  • 9. www.conservationcenter.org Action Program 2009 Goal: 220 Action Program participants 2009 Actual: 269 Action Program participants Action consultations is a term used to describe a variety of services - one-on-one interaction with a homeowner to discuss retrofit options, a Home Energy Action Plan with a prioritized list of improvements, estimated cost and greenhouse gas calculations, contractor referrals, review of contractor’s estimates, and financing information. The action consultations focus on home improvements of interest to the homeowner that also yield the highest return on investment in terms of energy savings. Figure 7 outlines the jurisdictional breakdown of the action program consultations. Figure 5. Action Consultations Action Consultations 140 129 120 Boulder 100 Longmont 80 65 Superior 60 47 Louisville 40 12 Boulder County: Unincorporated 16 20 and NonParticipating Cities 0 Of the 269 Action Program participants, 98 completed an Action Program cycle. Figure 8 is a snapshot of those 98 homes with the improvements that were completed, currently planned, and recommended by the auditor or desired by the homeowner. Page 10 of 27
  • 10. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 6. Project Status Update Project Status of 98 Homes Participating in the Action Program Low flow showerhead Dryer Clothes Washer Dishwasher Refrigerator Replacement Cooling Solar Thermal Solar PV Lighting Water Heating Duct Sealing Furnace/Boiler Weather Strip Doors Windows Whole House or Attic Fan Air Sealing Perimeter Insulation Wall Insulation Attic Insulation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 POST REAP PLANNED RECOMMENDED or DESIRED Figure 9 assumes an average reduction of 2.34 metric tons of CO2e per home with a potential for 4.05 metric tons of CO2e* for the 98 homes who gave project status updates in January’s phone call campaign.i Figure 7. Carbon Emissions Reduction Per Home Carbon Emissions Reductions for 98 Homes Participating in the *NOTE: The REAP Program Action Program Project Status Update Project Manager created a calculator that estimates energy savings and 4.5 4.05 mtCO2e greenhouse gas reductions per 4 household was prepared based 3.5 on Xcel Energy’s Demand Side 3 Management Plan (pages 419- 2.34 mtCO2e 457.) The calculator was also mtCO2e 2.5 Actual GHG Savings 2 Potential GHG Savings built into the REAP database to 1.5 summarize expected and 1 potential energy reductions and 0.5 greenhouse gas savings 0 associated with project statuses. 1 Page 11 of 27
  • 11. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 10 assumes an aggregate reduction of 229 metric tons of CO2e per home per year with a potential for 397 metric tons of CO2e for the 269 homes participating in the 2009 Action Program. Figure 8. Carbon Emissions Reduction for 269 Homes Carbon Emissions Reductions for 98 Homes Participating in the Action Program Project Status Update Project 450 397 mtCO2e 400 350 300 229 mtCO2e mtCO2e 250 Actual GHG Savings 200 Potential GHG Savings 150 100 50 0 1 The average anticipated investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy for REAP participants is $17,100, based on information collected on the REAP application. The median anticipated investment is $15,000. The average and median income of REAP participants is in the $90,000 to $95,000 range. Figure 9. Analysis on 98 Homes Anticipated Investment from Homeowners Average Anticipated Investment Per Home on REAP Application $ 17,100.00 Median Anticipated Investment Per Home on REAP Application $ 15,000.00 Investment Assumptions for 98 Homes Actual Investment Per Home (from calc.) $ 7,185.36 Investment Per Home if All Recommended Improvements are Completed (from calc.) $ 16,084.90 Energy Savings Assumptions for 98 Homes Aggregate 128,136 kWh Aggregate 20,550 Therms Per Home 1308 kWh Per Home 210 Therms Carbon Savings Assumptions for 98 Homes Aggregate 504,859 lbs Aggregate 229 mtCO2e Per Home 5159 lbs Per Home 2.34 mtCO2e Page 12 of 27
  • 12. www.conservationcenter.org Attic insulation, refrigerator replacement, efficient lighting and air-sealing yield the best payback. If all 17 energy efficiency upgrades in the calculator are completed, the project cost would total approximately $21,975 and avoid 10,644 pounds or 4.83 metric tons of CO2 per home. Based on the sample size of 98 homes, an investment from action consultation participants of $7,185.36 per home is assumed. An additional $8,899.54 would need to be spent per home to complete all of the energy efficiency upgrades in the calculator, excluding solar thermal and photovoltaic. Some homes are built to code or retrofits had been completed before REAP, potentially reducing the amount needed to be invested to reach the ideal emissions reductions. Figure 10. Carbon Emissions Reduction for 269 Conclusions can be related to 269 Homes homes in the Action Program based on the statistical Carbon Emissions Reductions for 269 Homes Participating in the Action Program significance of 98 homes. 98 homes out of 269 people 450 1,090 mtCO2e responded to a phone call 400 campaign, yielding a 36% 350 response rate. The primary 300 purpose of the call campaign was 629 mtCO2e mtCO2e 250 Actual GHG Savings to find out what improvements 200 Potential GHG Savings homeowners had made after 150 participating in the Action Program. 100 The study indicates that with 95% 50 confidence it can be stated that 0 79%-91% of the homeowners in 1 REAP Action have made improvements, with an average of 4 improvements per home. Action participants who joined REAP in Q409 were unlikely to report completed improvements during the call campaign. It is assumed that Q409 participants account for percentage of homeowners that had made no improvements. The following data is based on statistical data from the 98 homes. Page 13 of 27
  • 13. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 11 assumes an aggregate reduction of 629 metric tons of CO2e per home with a potential for 1,090 metric tons of CO2e for the 269 homes participating in the 2009 Action Program. Figure 11. Analysis on 269 Homes Investment Assumptions for 269 Homes Actual homeowner investment in efficiency improvements $1.9 million Potential homeowner investment in efficiency improvements $4.3 million Energy Savings Assumptions for 269 Homes Aggregate 351,852 kWh Aggregate 56,490 Therms Per Home 1308 kWh Per Home 210 Therms Carbon Savings Assumptions for 269 Homes Aggregate 138,6708 lbs Aggregate 629 mtCO2e Per Home 5159 lbs Per Home 2.34 mtCO2e Data relating to past REAP audit-only participants is limited. It is assumed that audits without consultations promotes energy action and that the Action Program increases numbers of retrofits but further analysis must be conducted to examine the impact. The following data can be used to assume a projection if all 1700 homes that have received energy audits in REAP from 2006-2009 enter the Action Program. This data can also give a projection of REAP’s expansion. The statistical significance of 98 homes compared to 1700 REAP participants gives a confidence interval of 12.15. Figure 12. Analysis on 1700 Homes Estimated Investment in Audits 2006-2009 Homeowner investment in audits $240,000 Government investment in audit subsidies $125,000 Utility company investment in audit subsidies $200,000 Investment Assumptions for 1700 REAP Participants Actual homeowner investment in efficiency improvements $12.2 million Potential homeowner investment in efficiency improvements $27.3 million Energy Savings Assumptions for 1700 Homes Aggregate 2,223,600 kWh Aggregate 357,000 Therms Per Home 1308 kWh Per Home 210 Therms Carbon Savings Assumptions for 1700 Homes Aggregate 8,770,300 lbs Aggregate 3,978 mtCO2e Per Home 5159 lbs Per Home 2.34 mtCO2e Page 14 of 27
  • 14. www.conservationcenter.org Symbiotic POOH Utility Bill Analysis NOTE: Utility bill analysis differs from the projected analysis for two reasons: 1.) bill analysis includes occupant behavior and purchases of electronic or devices that increase household energy consumption 2.) projected analysis assumes energy reduction per year without taking into account when the project is installed. The following four graphs display results from the weather normalized utility bill analysis of 508 households through Symbiotic Engineering’s Program Overview and Operational History (POOH) platform. These records are a subset of the 1700 homes that have received energy audits from 2006-2009. Figure A presents the cumulative greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 508 homes from 2006-2009, that have been normalized based on Figure A their enrollment date. In other words, the displayed monthly periods represent the first, second, etc. months after a household received an audit. Looking at the first twelve month period after enrollment in the program, the cumulative GHG emissions reductions is approximately 220 mtCO2e. Given that some program participants did not have a full year of post-audit utility billing data, this reported GHG emissions savings is expected to be higher than has been actually realized. Furthermore, if households which realized GHG emissions savings (336 out of 508 homes) are isolated, the observed GHG emissions reductions per household become 1.9 mtCO2e. Page 15 of 27
  • 15. www.conservationcenter.org Looking at the first twelve month period after enrollment in the program, the cumulative natural gas emissions reductions is approximately 1,733 therms, as shown in Figure B. Figure B Figure C displays the cumulative electricity saving over the first twelve month period after enrollment date with a cumulative savings of 111,302 kilowatt hours. Figure C Page 16 of 27
  • 16. www.conservationcenter.org Figure D shows the frequency distribution of the percent change in greenhouse gas emissions for 443 homes. The outlier categories of greater than and less than 25 metric tons might be attributed to incomplete data sets. Removing the outlier categories reduces the data set to 316 homes. Therefore, 63% of homes reduced their greenhouse gas emissions. Figure D Page 17 of 27
  • 17. www.conservationcenter.org Customer Satisfaction A customer satisfaction survey was sent to the 269 Action Program participants, achieving a 13% response rate. Figure 15 evaluates the educational aspect of action consultations. Figure 13. Educational Evaluation On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the most, how much have you learned from our program in terms of... how to talk with contractors about your 13% 21% 35% 16% 13% energy efficient needs? what is involved with the installation of energy 5% 13% 29% 32% 18% efficient technology? how to choose an energy efficient 2% 13% 24% 35% 24% technology that suits your needs? the financial return (rebates or tax credits) 8% 32% 35% 24% on your investment? This figure indicates that REAP has excelled at teaching homeowners about return on investment and choosing efficient technologies. Based on customer comments, it is recommended for REAP to:  “Expand the lists and price comparison for contractors”  “Let people know how much money they could save by implementing the suggestions”  “Allow consumers to rate vendors and have this available for others to reference”  “A matrix that enables you to discern quickly what services are offered by various contractors that are listed on your web site. Have a check in each column (e.g. insulation) for a service provided by the contract. Sorting through their promotional sentences does not always make it clear which contractor provides what services.”  “Have someone to check on contractors work if problems occur” Page 18 of 27
  • 18. www.conservationcenter.org In addition, REAP customers were asked “Would you pay for the REAP services if it were not funded by the local government?” Figure 14. Value Would you Pay for the REAP Services if it were not Funded by Commentary varied. Some the Local Governments? questioned the cost of such a service, such as “Most likely too expensive without the subsidy” and “it depends on the cost, but overall 28% was a huge help!” Others gave Yes suggestions for program No improvement, “If I paid for them, I Maybe would want to have an info sheet that 55% showed how my expense paid for itself in X years, just like you get from 17% a solar company instigating you to spend money on them.” Figure 16 summarizes the findings. A calling campaign to the 269 Action Program participants was executed for project status updates. Contact was made with 98 people, lending a 36% response rate. The primary purpose of the call campaign was to find out what improvements homeowners had made after participating in the Action Program.  85% had made home improvements as a result of the action program. The estimated homeowner investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements for the 98 homeowners was $700,000 in estimated homeowner investment of efficiency and renewable technologies.  Investment average of $7,185 per home.  Averages of 4 energy upgrades were made per home. Page 19 of 27
  • 19. www.conservationcenter.org Marketing and Outreach The CRC provide brochures, website information for REAP and the rebate programs, press releases, provided workshops and presentations for REAP and had two articles in the Conservation Magazine. The CRC staff also made reasonable attempts to solicit media coverage for the program. Per the MOUs, each government partner was required to make a significant contribution to the marketing of REAP. Suggested marketing outlets included:  Utility bill insert  Direct mailing  City Newsletter  Public Service Announcement in local paper  Public Service Announcement on local radio station  Advertisement in local newspaper  Securing a story in local newspaper  Post on City website  Post in free local calendar listings  Place brochure in utility billing office  Post on community website  Post text or produce a sport for local cable channel In addition, REAP was marketed with the following avenues:  REAP PowerPoint Presentations: o Neighborhood meetings, to include city of Boulder Neighborhood Action Group meetings, Longmont neighborhood meetings and block parties o Businesses, such as Google o Boulder Green Building Guild (BGBG) brown bag lunches o BuildSmart and Green Points educational series  Ads in Daily Camera, Longmont Times, Superior Observer, Mountain Ear, Conservation Magazine  Articles in the Camera, Conservation Magazine, Longmont Times  Bi-monthly tabling at Boulder Farmer’s Market  Boulder County Solar Week, to include: o REAP audits highlighted in Tour applications and in home features in Conservation Magazine o Signage about REAP in the homes during the tour o Two REAP workshops during Solar Week  Other events included 36 ClimateSmart Loan Program Workshops, Sustainability Fair, Longmont Rhythm on the River, and other events throughout the County  Email distribution in CRC E-news, ClimateSmart E-news, viral emails  Contractor referrals, referrals from realtors Page 20 of 27
  • 20. www.conservationcenter.org  Website information on each partner city website, CRC, ClimateSmart, GEO, contractor websites  Word-of-mouth  Utility bill inserts for LPC customers  Mail inserts with realtor’s advertising  Flyer inserts in solar companies sales packets – Namaste Solar, Bella Energy, Uva, Aqua Care  Other programs such as Slow the Flow, ClimateSmart, Solar Home Tour  Building departments for the city of Boulder, Longmont and Boulder County Figure 15. Marketing and Outreach From the REAP Marketing and Outreach Results application, the CRC was for Audit and Action Participants able to determine how REAP participants heard about the program. Figure 17 is an aggregate 22% ClimateSmart and CRC of how all 2009 Programs/Staff participants, who Local Government 40% received both audits and Utility Company action plans, heard about the program. 14% Friends, Family, and Neighbors Print, Web and Events 13% 11% Page 21 of 27
  • 21. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 18 examines the 14% of participants who heard about REAP through their friends, family and neighbors. In a customer satisfaction survey, those surveyed were asked how many people they told about the program. 91% of people who responded told at least one person. Figure 16. Social Mobilization How many People have you Mentioned this Program to within your Community? 6% 9% 17% None 1 to 10 10 to 25 25 to 50 68% Page 22 of 27
  • 22. www.conservationcenter.org Social Mobilization The REAP Program led a countywide social mobilization effort. The two primary components of this were: (1) targeted calling campaign and (2) outreach to local social groups. In defining and executing REAP, the CRC looked at the 4 marketing "phases” referenced in the AIDA model. AIDA is an acronym used in marketing that describes a common list of events that are very often undergone when a person is selling a product or service:  A - Awareness: attract the attention of the customer.  I - Interest: raise customer interest by focusing on and demonstrating advantages and benefits (instead of focusing on features, as in traditional advertising).  D - Desire: convince customers that they want and desire the product or service and that it will satisfy their needs.  A - Action: lead customers towards taking action and/or purchasing. Figure 19 displays direct outreach by phone call for participating locations. As part of the focused calling campaign CRC called potential and current REAP participants. CRC used complimentary program lists (i.e. CRCs water audit list) to generate Awareness-Interest-Desire (A-I-D) for REAP and facilitate Action. Figure 17. Outreach with Calling Campaign Further, the current REAP lists were used to develop a target list for Direct Outreach insulation participants. Calls were made to this target list in an effort to 509 drive repeat action (these are Boulder # of Homes participants that have already taken Longmont action by joining REAP - some have Superior already made EE improvements - and 197 202 Louisville repeat action is often easier to insight Boulder County: Uninc. than initial action). 30 43 and NonParticipating As part of the outreach to local social groups, the Energy Division staff developed contacts and conducted informational meetings with various organizations, including volunteer organizations, local companies, and homeowner associations. Summary presentations were given to organizations and interested parties on the Insulate Colorado program and on REAP as a whole. This effort also included training Energy Corps (a complimentary County program) on effective homeowner engagement and energy efficiency education. This outreach further prompted A-I-D and is expected to lead to future Action (i.e. program enrollment). The following table outlines the results of CRCs efforts on the social mobilization effort. Page 23 of 27
  • 23. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 18. Social Mobilization with Mass Media GEO Marketing Grant Social Mobilization with Mass Media Goal Actual Estimated Investment CRC Total Outreach (generated from phone call campaign) 500 605 $5,000 Targeted Call List Local Awareness Interest Social Groups CRC Total Incoming (generated from media campaign) none specified 63 $15,000 Desire Emails to CRC Calls to CRC CRC Total Action REAP Enrollment Energy none specified 192 Action Consultation From CRCs perspective, the marketing campaign was effective in generating Awareness, Interest and Desire (A-I-D), and also in prompting Action (i.e. REAP enrollment). The stated objective of this specific marketing program was, "Increase awareness of the Insulate Colorado and the parent program, Residential Energy Action Program, thereby generating phone calls to CRC; and also the ClimateSmart Loan Program and Boulder County Energy Corp." From that viewpoint, the program was successful, and it is anticipated that the benefits of this campaign (A-I-D-A generation) will continue for some time. Figure 19. Marketing G E O M a rk e t ing G ra nt - M a rk e t ing C lic k t o C lic k f o r N um b er C lim a t e S m a r t M ore N ot es R eac hed We b s it e In f o r m a t io n D a ily C a m e r a A d s 1 5 1 ,0 0 0 c o m p a r a b le t o in d u s t r y O n lin e 184 7 0 ,0 0 0 st and ard s P r in t 2 9 % o p e n e d t h e e m a il 6 .2 % c lic k e d f o r m o r e E m a il B la s t 2 ,3 7 2 691 146 in f o r m a t io n 41% C lim a t e S m a r t L is t 1 ,4 8 3 615 127 o p e n e d e m a il 8 .6 % C R C - R E A P L is t c lic k e d f o r m o r e in f o r m a t io n T w it t e r 400 Page 24 of 27
  • 24. www.conservationcenter.org 2010 REAP Outlook For the 2010 program, the program has continued with the REAP flow process outlined on page 6. However, to maximize efficiencies and build capacity, the following program elements will be considered. Internal efficiencies:  To assist in transitioning new staff into the program, a REAP Operations Manual was created so that the program is easily operable by new staff, volunteers and interns. The manual includes office passwords and logins, procedures for sending and receiving paperwork, outreach and marketing history, an energy information reference guide for the most frequently asked questions, links to rebate forms and tax information, and procedures for utility data collection and distribution. The Manual standardizes program practices and procedures.  Internal reports are distributed to management staff at CRC for close monitoring of budgets and goals. Capacity Building:  A one week REAP training tri-annually is recommended to engage students and the community at large to volunteer. The training content should focus on building science, financial incentives, behavior change and how to engage the homeowner.  Satellite sites in Longmont are recommended to remove the social and geographical barrier of program dissemination in Longmont. According to John Farmer’s report, “Reducing Carbon Emissions in Boulder County,” messaging to residents in Longmont differs from other Boulder County cities. It seems important for REAP staff to build relationships with community members in Longmont in person. Action Program:  Calling campaigns for project status updates should be made monthly to track home improvements. These campaigns also serve as outreach to engage the homeowner in the next level of action, such as the installation of another efficiency measure. Calling campaigns stimulate Awareness, Interest, and Desire which leads to Action.  Figure 22 shows a method that was created to determine if a home is in the low, medium, and high energy use categories. A home in the high usage category is assumed to have more potential for energy reductions than a home in the low usage category. For this exercise, 250 home energy usages were analyzed. Page 25 of 27
  • 25. www.conservationcenter.org Figure 20. Energy Profiling Square Footage CO2 Emission CO2 Emission CO2 Emission Level 1 (low) Level 2 (med) Level 3 (high) 1000-1500 0 to 5 5 to 9 9+ 1500-2000 0 to 7 7 to 12 12+ 2000-2500 0 to 9 9 to 14 14+ 2500-3000 0 to 11 11 to 15 15+ 3000-3500 0 to 13 13 to 17 17+ 3500-4000 0 to 15 15 to 19 19+ 4000+ 0 to 17 17 to 21 21+ Percentage of 250 Participants in Each Category 45% 34% 21% Targeting high energy users to participate in REAP is a preferred outreach strategy. The return on investment in terms of carbon emission reduction is significantly greater for larger homes. However, after the pilot, Xcel Energy audits and Energy Corps assessments guaranteed lead generation that did not Figure 21. Energy Usage Profiles necessitate energy profiling. In Energy Usage Profiles order to conduct consistent energy profiling, energy records 120 must be collected for each home as 100 it enters the program. The format of the energy records 80 would likely be in PDF and would # of Homes HIGH require a data management staff 60 MEDIUM person to transfer the PDF to LOW excel for energy profiling 40 calculations. Energy profiling is highly recommended by REAP 20 staff. 0 Marketing and Outreach:  People who are engaged in a conservation action are likely to be easily motivated to participate in another conservation action. Therefore, it may be worthwhile to cross- promote conservation programs within the CRC. Examples of such cross-promotion includes to habitually call participants in the water audit program each September, to set up an energy outreach booth at the ReSource Yard, and to network with Water and ReSource program contacts to expand REAP into other Colorado cities. Page 26 of 27
  • 26. www.conservationcenter.org Tracking and Reporting:  A database that can interface with a customer relations management system and allows multiple users is a high priority for the program. A General Knowledge Base is currently in development to advance the information delivery system much like a call center does.  A Monthly Report Generator was built to ensure consistent monthly reporting to program partners. The monthly report presents program participation data, a marketing and outreach graph, project status summaries and estimated emissions reduction potential. The monthly report will motivate staff to achieve higher emissions reductions and to focus on clients who have numerous efficiency measures to complete.  A comparative analysis can be conducted to understand retrofit increase as a result of the Action Program. A calling campaign to people who have had audits but did not participate in the Action Program could be executed. A comparative analysis of ClimateSmart Loan Program projects versus REAP projects could also be executed. Customer comments to consider:  “Expand the lists and price comparison for contractors”  “Let people know how much money they could save by implementing the suggestions”  “Allow consumers to rate vendors and have this available for others to reference”  “A matrix that enables you to discern quickly what services are offered by various contractors that are listed on your web site. Have a check in each column (e.g. insulation) for a service provided by the contract. Sorting through their promotional sentences does not always make it clear which contractor provides what services.” i Carbon emissions are based on City of Boulder’s calculations 0.00532 mtCO2e/therm and 0.0009233 mtCO2e/kWh or 11.7285 lbCO2e/therm and 2.03552 lbCO2e/kWh. Page 27 of 27