CHAPTER 7
Peoples of North America
SETTING THE SCENE
Climate and natural resources had profound effects
on the daily life for the first people in North Ameri...
EARLY TRIBES
THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---HOHOKAMS









More than 1,000 years ago, fields of corn, beans, and
squash bloomed in th...
GILA RIVER
HOHOKAM IRRIGATION DITCHES
THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---ANASAZIS
The best-known society of the southwest was that
of the Anasazi
 They lived in what is kn...
FOUR CORNERS REGION
FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
VISITING FOUR STATES AT ONE TIME!!!
ANASAZI PEOPLE
PUEBLO
PUEBLO
THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---ANASAZIS












In the late 1100s, the Anasazi began building housing
complexes in the s...
MESA VERDE
MESA VERDE
MESA VERDE
MESA VERDE
THE MOUND BUILDERS
In the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, other farming
cultures emerged as early as 700 BC
 The Adena and ...
MAP OF MOUND BUILDERS
MISSISSIPPIAN TOWN
CAHOKIA MOUNDS
MOUND
CAHOKIA MOUNDS
DIVERSE REGIONAL CULTURES
Modern scholars have identified 10 culture areas in
North America based on the environments in w...
A FROZEN WORLD
In the frozen north, the Inuits (Eskimos) adapted to
a harsh climate using limited resources of the
frozen ...
INUITS (ESKIMOS)
KAYAK AND DOGLSEDS
POLAR BEARS
IGLOOS
A LAND OF PLENTY










The people of the Northwest Coast lived in a far richer
environment than the Inuits
Rive...
PACIFIC NORTHWEST TRIBES (WASHINGTON)
CANOE
WILD SALMON
GRILLED SALMON
PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIVES
THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE
The Iroquois lived in the Eastern Woodlands, which
stretched from the Atlantic Coast to the Great Lake...
DEKANAWIDAH
IROQUOIS LEAGUE
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 7 Peoples of North America

1,000 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,000
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 7 Peoples of North America

  1. 1. CHAPTER 7 Peoples of North America
  2. 2. SETTING THE SCENE Climate and natural resources had profound effects on the daily life for the first people in North America  The impact of the environment stretched far beyond the southwest  Hundreds of cultural groups emerged in presentday United States and Canada  Early people lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering  The success of farming led to large populations and permanent settlements 
  3. 3. EARLY TRIBES
  4. 4. THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---HOHOKAMS        More than 1,000 years ago, fields of corn, beans, and squash bloomed in the desert southwest These crops were raised by the Hohokams (“Vanished Ones”) To farm the desert, they built complex irrigation systems The Hohokams lived near the Gila River in present-day Arizona They may have acquired skills such as irrigation from the civilizations of Middle America They built temple mounds and ball courts The Hohokams survived until about 1500 AD, when a drought forced them from their settlements
  5. 5. GILA RIVER
  6. 6. HOHOKAM IRRIGATION DITCHES
  7. 7. THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---ANASAZIS The best-known society of the southwest was that of the Anasazi  They lived in what is known as the Four Corners region of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah  Between about 900-1300 AD, the Anasazi built large villages called pueblos (named by the Spanish)  Kivas (large underground chambers) were used for religious ceremonies  Paintings on walls show their concern with weather, including storms that might damage crops 
  8. 8. FOUR CORNERS REGION
  9. 9. FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
  10. 10. FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
  11. 11. FOUR CORNERS MONUMENT
  12. 12. VISITING FOUR STATES AT ONE TIME!!!
  13. 13. ANASAZI PEOPLE
  14. 14. PUEBLO
  15. 15. PUEBLO
  16. 16. THE DESERT SOUTHWEST---ANASAZIS       In the late 1100s, the Anasazi began building housing complexes in the shadow of canyon walls, where the cliffs offered protection from raiders The largest of these cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde, in present-day Colorado, had over 200 rooms People had to climb ladders to reach their fields on the flatlands above or the canyon floor below In the late 1200s, a long drought forced the Anasazi to abandon their land Attacks by Navajos and Apaches may have contributed further to their decline Anasazi traditions survive among the Hopis and other Pueblo Indians of the present-day southwestern U.S.
  17. 17. MESA VERDE
  18. 18. MESA VERDE
  19. 19. MESA VERDE
  20. 20. MESA VERDE
  21. 21. THE MOUND BUILDERS In the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, other farming cultures emerged as early as 700 BC  The Adena and Hopewell peoples left behind giant earthen mounds  The Mississippian people also built great earthen mounds  Their greatest center, Cahokia in present-day Illinois, housed as many as 40,000 people by about 1200 AD  Cahokia boasted at least 60 mounds 
  22. 22. MAP OF MOUND BUILDERS
  23. 23. MISSISSIPPIAN TOWN
  24. 24. CAHOKIA MOUNDS
  25. 25. MOUND
  26. 26. CAHOKIA MOUNDS
  27. 27. DIVERSE REGIONAL CULTURES Modern scholars have identified 10 culture areas in North America based on the environments in which people lived: Arctic, Subarctic, Northwest Coast, California, Great Basin, Plateau, Southwest, Great Plains, Eastern Woodlands, and Southeast  In each area, people adapted to geographic conditions that influenced their ways of life 
  28. 28. A FROZEN WORLD In the frozen north, the Inuits (Eskimos) adapted to a harsh climate using limited resources of the frozen land to survive  Seals and other sea mammals provided them with food, skins for clothing, bones for needles and tools, and oil for cooking  The used kayaks in open waters or dog sleds to transport goods across ice  Inuits also constructed igloos, or dome-shaped homes made from snow and ice 
  29. 29. INUITS (ESKIMOS)
  30. 30. KAYAK AND DOGLSEDS
  31. 31. POLAR BEARS
  32. 32. IGLOOS
  33. 33. A LAND OF PLENTY        The people of the Northwest Coast lived in a far richer environment than the Inuits Rivers teemed with salmon, and the Pacific Ocean offered other fish and sea mammals Hunters tracked deer, wolves, and bears in forests People built large, permanent villages with homes made of wood They traded surplus goods, gaining wealth that was shared at a potlatch At this ceremony, which continues in Canada today, a person of rank and wealth distributes lavish gifts to a large number of guests By accepting the gifts, the guests acknowledge the host’s high status
  34. 34. PACIFIC NORTHWEST TRIBES (WASHINGTON)
  35. 35. CANOE
  36. 36. WILD SALMON
  37. 37. GRILLED SALMON
  38. 38. PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIVES
  39. 39. THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE The Iroquois lived in the Eastern Woodlands, which stretched from the Atlantic Coast to the Great Lakes  According to Iroquois tradition, the prophet Dekanawidah urged rival Iroquois nations to stop their constant wars  Out of that grew the Iroquois League---an alliance of five nations who spoke the same language and shared similar traditions  Member nations governed their own villages but met jointly in a council when they needed to address larger issues 
  40. 40. DEKANAWIDAH
  41. 41. IROQUOIS LEAGUE

×