Palestra MIEIC Junho 2014

  • 1,462 views
Uploaded on

Palestra realizada a 18 de junho de 2014, integrada da sessão de apresentação de trabalhos dos alunos da unidade curricular de Desenvolvimento de Jogos de Computador do Mestrado Integrado em …

Palestra realizada a 18 de junho de 2014, integrada da sessão de apresentação de trabalhos dos alunos da unidade curricular de Desenvolvimento de Jogos de Computador do Mestrado Integrado em Engenharia Informática e Computação da Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,462
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
41

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Jorge Simões, Instituto Superior Politécnico Gaya, Portugal www.ispgaya.pt From Games to Gamification Desenvolvimento de Jogos de Computador MIEIC 18 de junho de 2014
  • 2. … and from Gamification to … •  Education •  Business •  Government •  Healthcare •  Lifestyle •  Sustainability •  etc From Games to Gamification
  • 3. q Origin and evolution q Definitions q Game elements q Behavior psychology q Examples q Gamification of education q Tools and platforms q How to apply in education Agenda
  • 4. If games are so engaging, let’s find out why, and use game thinking and game design outside games to motivate and engage people … Gamification: how did it started?
  • 5. q Soviet Union - early to mid 20th century, like a way to motivate workers without relying on capitalist-style monetary incentives; q American management - on the transition from the 20th to the 21st century - turning the workplace into a more playful setting; q “Gamification of work” (or playbour) – Charles Coonradt (the “grandfather of gamification”) published the book The Game of Work (1984) to deal with employee motivation; q Frequent flyer programs in airline companies where travelers gain miles (i.e. points) that can be exchanged for some benefit; q Marketing campaigns incorporate game features for a long time. Gamification: the early origin
  • 6. q “The wrong word for the right idea”; q Seen by many as misleading and difficult to define; q The term “gamification” was coined by Nick Pelling, a British programmer and video game designer in 2002 and became public in 2003; q Other alleged authors; q In digital media - written as gameification - was mentioned for the first time in 2008 in a blog post (Terrill, 2008). Gamification: the name
  • 7. (exploitationware; pointsification; badgification) Some game designers do not agree neither with the word nor with the concept and propose alternate terms: Gamification: the name
  • 8. q Video games have become mainstream; q The Web 2.0 brought social games; q Change in technology: mobile devices with sensors and always on-line. Gamification: why now?
  • 9. Google Trends June, 2014 The term only started to be searched in Google on August, 2010 Gamification: web search interest
  • 10. July, 2013 Gamification: Gartner Hype Cycle Gartner uses hype cycles to track technology adoption: after the “peak of inflated expectations” period, technologies will fall into the “trough of disillusionment”. Then, they will start evolving to the “slope of enlightenment” and some of them will reach the “plateau of productivity”.
  • 11. “Motivating people through data.” (Rajat Paharia, founder of Bunchball, April 2014) “The use of game mechanics and experience design to digitally engage and motivate people to achieve their goals” (Brian Burke, Gartner,April 2014) “The process of making activities more game-like” (KevinWerbach, University of Pennsylvania, January 2014) Gamification: definitions
  • 12. “The use of game design elements in non-game contexts” (Deterding et al., 2011). Gamification: definitions The most used definition:
  • 13. The use of game design elements in non-game contexts, to drive a game-like engagement in order to promote desired behaviors. http://www.mrtoledano.com/gamers Gamification: a definition
  • 14. PBL / BLAP Elements Gamification: a definition - … game design elements … (Points, Badges and Leaderboards / Badges, Leaderboards, Achievements and Points)
  • 15. not the same as http://www.gamified.co.uk/2014/06/04/language-gamification-short-glossary/#.U56vay_eMso Gamification: a definition - … game design elements … Game Elements: components taken from games q Game Mechanics: explicit sets of rules that define the outcomes of user activities. q Game Dynamics: emergent activities of the users as they interact with mechanics. q Aesthetics: the experience of the end user.
  • 16. Using game elements does not translate directly to engagement http://progresswars.com FB: Cow Clicker Gamification: a definition - … game design elements …
  • 17. (until March 2013) Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts … Foursquare
  • 18. Business Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 19. Lifestyle & Wellness Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 20. Sustainability Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 21. Healthcare Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 22. Government Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts … thefuntheory.com
  • 23. Education Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 24. Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts … Gamified systems in digital and non-digital contexts
  • 25. BigDoor BunchBall Badgeville Gygia Playbasis PunchTab CaptainUp Uplaude Uboost tierX … Gamification Platforms Nike+ Zamzee Fitbit HAPIfork Grush … Foursquare Foodzy Lose It! HabitRPG SuperBetter … Applications (web applications, apps) ClassDojo ChoreWars HighScore House ChoreMonster Vivo Miles … Gamification: a definition - … in non-game contexts …
  • 26. Flow Theory Self-Determination Theory Gamification: a definition - …to drive a game-like engagement … Psychology
  • 27. The Self-Determination Theory (SDT) People are said to be intrinsically motivated when they do something because it is inherently interesting or enjoyable and they are extrinsically motivated when they do something because it leads to a separable outcome. Gamification: a definition - …to drive a game-like engagement … q Proposed by Deci and Ryan (1985); q Framework for the study of human motivation and personality; q A theory of motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic motivation.
  • 28. The Self-Determination Theory (SDT) Gamification: a definition - …to drive a game-like engagement … Focus on psychological basic needs: q Autonomy - control over an action with the ability to determine the outcomes of that action; q Competence (or Mastery) - the need for challenge and a felling of being effective performing an activity; q Relatedness - the experience to be connected to others and be involved with others.
  • 29. 8 major elements of flow: q A challenge activity that requires skills; q Clear goals; q Immediate feedback; q The sense of control; q Concentration on the task at hand; q The merging of action and awareness; q The loss of self-consciousness; q The distortion of time. Gamification: a definition - …to drive a game-like engagement … The Flow Theory (Csikszentmihalyi,1975) Intrinsic Motivation Flow
  • 30. Gamification: a definition - … to promote desired behaviors. Fogg’s Behavior Model Psychology
  • 31. A non-game context with high potential. Gamification of education Game-Based Learning (GBL) and the Serious Games movement contribute to the spread of the concept, revealing that games could be useful in non-ludic contexts instead of just being used for fun and amusement.
  • 32. http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed Gamification of education
  • 33. Gamification of education: tools
  • 34. Gamification of education: tools https://wiki.mozilla.org/images/e/ed/Mozilla-OpenBadges-presentation.pdf
  • 35. Gamification of education: learning platforms Gamified learning platforms
  • 36. Academy Platform LMS based on Fogg’s Behavioral Model Gamification of education: learning platforms
  • 37. Gamification of education: learning platforms
  • 38. Gamification of education: learning platforms
  • 39. Gamification of education: learning platforms
  • 40. Gamification of education: learning platforms
  • 41. Gamification of education: learning platforms Game elements in Moodle: q Quiz results block (leaderboard) q Progress bars (plug-in) q Badges (since release 2.5) q Conditional access
  • 42. Gamification of education: with what and how? With what? q Gamified platforms q LMS with game elements (plug-in’s, add-on’s) q Other tools q Activities with clear goals q Intermediate goals q Immediate feedback q Balance skill / challenge §  repeat after failure / fun failure §  leveling up / player levels How? Game elements must be used to provide immediate feedback!
  • 43. §  Self-Determination Theory http://www.theselfdeterminationtheory.org §  Fogg’s Behavior Model http://www.behaviormodel.org/ §  Flow Theory http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/en/Flow_theory http://www.jenovachen.com/flowingames/flowtheory.htm §  Gco http://www.gamification.co/ §  Enterprise gamification wiki http://www.enterprise-gamification.com/mediawiki/ §  Mozilla Open Badges http://www.openbadges.org/ §  Gamification Gurus https://www.leaderboarded.com/gurus Resources
  • 44. §  Nelson, M. (2012). Soviet and american precursors to the gamification of work. In Lugmayr,A., editor, MindTrek, pages 23–26.ACM. §  Coonradt, C. (2007). The Game of Work: How to Enjoy Work as Much as Play. Gibbs Smith. §  Terrill, B. (2008). My coverage of lobby of the social gaming summit [web log message]. §  Deterding, S., Dixon, D., Khaled, R., and Nacke, L. (2011). From game design elements to gamefulness: Defining ”gamification". In Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Envisioning Future Media Environments, MindTrek ’11, pages 9–15, NewYork, NY, USA.ACM. §  Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1975). Beyond Boredom and Anxiety. Jossey Bass, San Francisco, CA. §  Deci, E. and Ryan, R. (1985). Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. Plenum, New York. References
  • 45. §  Fogg, B. (2009).A behavior model for persuasive design. In Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Persuasive Technology. §  The Mozilla Foundation and Peer 2 Peer University (2012). Open badges for lifelong learning.Technical report,The Mozilla Foundation. §  Werbach, K. and Hunter, D. (2012). For the Win: How Game Thinking Can RevolutionizeYour Business. Wharton Digital Press. §  Kapp, K. (2012). The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education. Pfeiffer. §  Kapp, K., Blair, L., and Mesch, R. (2014) .The Gamification of Learning and Instruction Fieldbook: Ideas into Pratice. Wiley. §  Marczewski,A. (2012). Gamification:A Simple Introduction. Marczewski,A. References
  • 46. Obrigado, Jorge Simões, Instituto Superior Politécnico Gaya jsimoes@ispgaya.pt @jmapsimoes http://about.me/jmapsimoes http://pt.linkedin.com/in/jmapsimoes http://www.edulearning2.blogspot.com From Games to Gamification