Mapping the Future of Enterprise IT and Enterprise Capture
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Mapping the Future of Enterprise IT and Enterprise Capture

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Keynote presentation originally delivered at Kofax Transform, focuses on the evolution of Enterprise IT into the social space (and the creation of "systems of engagement", and the impact this will ...

Keynote presentation originally delivered at Kofax Transform, focuses on the evolution of Enterprise IT into the social space (and the creation of "systems of engagement", and the impact this will have on our traditional "systems of record" centric IT systems.

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  • I would like to spend my 30 minutes with you talking about 2 things. The first is the revolution in computing that is currently going on in the consumer space, and the impact that this will inevitably have on enterprise IT. The second is the impact that this revolution will have on the capture and enterprise capture space and the huge opportunities this represents for everyone in this room. The opportunities are massive – both for those who sell or package capture and content solutions and for those of who are charged with implementing those solutions.
  • I would like to spend my 30 minutes with you talking about 2 things. The first is the revolution in computing that is currently going on in the consumer space, and the impact that this will inevitably have on enterprise IT. The second is the impact that this revolution will have on the capture and enterprise capture space and the huge opportunities this represents for everyone in this room. The opportunities are massive – both for those who sell or package capture and content solutions and for those of who are charged with implementing those solutions.
  • Some of these concepts are at the core of a new white paper by Geoffrey Moore of Crossing the Chasm fame that we will be releasing this month. These concepts are also at the heart of a new benchmarking survey we have done on capture and BPM trends and another survey that we have done on SharePoint and capture. If you would like a copy of all three of these reports, all you need to do is text message your email address to XXXX and I’ll send them along free of charge.
  • These concepts are also at the heart of a new benchmarking survey we have done on capture and BPM trends and another survey that we have done on SharePoint and capture. If you would like a copy of all three of these reports, all you need to do is text message your email address to XXXX and I’ll send them along free of charge.
  • During my professional lifetime, I have seen at least 4 major enterprise IT transformations, and they seem to be occurring with increasing acceleration. When I first came into the workforce, the enterprise IT norm was centered on mainframe computers focused on batch-processed financial applications. This was the era of Burroughs and Univac and NCR and Control Data and Honeywell. This era was soon eclipsed by the rise of minicomputers.Minis were themselves eclipsed by the PC revolution, stitched together in Local Area Networks. Steroids in the form of the internet changed everything about how we connected PCs together distributed documents and information around our organizations. And then along came Google and our expectations about enterprise IT and simplicity of use morphed once again.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation.
  • Over the past decade, there has been a fundamental change in the axis of IT innovation. In prior decades, new systems were introduced at the very high end of the economic spectrum, typically within large public agencies and Fortune 500 companies. Over time these systems trickled down to smaller businesses, and then to home office applications, and finally to consumers, students and even children. In this past decade, however, that flow has been reversed. Now it is consumers, students and children who are leading the way, with early adopting adults and nimble small to medium size businesses following, and it is the larger institutions who are, frankly, the laggards.
  • Seth Godin: “It’s human nature to imagine that the future will be just like the present, but with cooler uniforms and flying cars.”1996 in retrospect was an inflection point. For AIIM and for our industry. Just on the wave of a massive round of consolidations as the primary vendors scrambled to build a suite of content tools. And feels the same now as organizations scramble to address some rather fundamental information management challenges sweeping through organizations.
  • The implications of this for Enterprise IT are profound. We grew up with letters, phones, telexes, and faxes, and grew into email, shared text databases like Lotus Notes, portals, web sites, and mobile phones. Now we are going through a massive transformation based on 1) connecting people in real time; 2) smart and geographically-aware mobile devices; and 3) ubiquitous and cheap bandwidth. 
  • Over the past decade, there has been a fundamental change in the axis of IT innovation. In prior decades, new systems were introduced at the very high end of the economic spectrum, typically within large public agencies and Fortune 500 companies. Over time these systems trickled down to smaller businesses, and then to home office applications, and finally to consumers, students and even children. In this past decade, however, that flow has been reversed. Now it is consumers, students and children who are leading the way, with early adopting adults and nimble small to medium size businesses following, and it is the larger institutions who are, frankly, the laggards.
  • For the first time, experience and expectations about computing are ubiquitous throughout our organizations. Technology touches EVERYONE in the culture, not just those entrusted to structure and run our IT systems. This creates incredible new expectations on the part of the business about what IT can and must do for the business.
  • Honor your customers above all elseEstablish an unprecedented level of focusHeighten customer exposureMeasure what customers valueUse two-way communication to stay in sync with customersMake customers part of your teamSolicit customer wantsCo-innovate and interact with customers in new waysDeliver true process transparencyProfit from the information explosionTap the value of limitless dataTranslate data into insight into action that creates business resultsShare information freely to build trust and improve customer relationships.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. in the world of Systems of Engagement – no one on the user side cares about any of this. However, because these systems are being used by enterprises, they will inevitably be subject to the same legal and social restrictions as traditional enterprise content, and therein lies the rub. Today that rub is significantly limiting endorsement and adoption of consumer-style communication and collaboration facilities around the world, and it will continue to do so until the content management industry and its customers develop protocols and policies to address its issues.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. in the world of Systems of Engagement – no one on the user side cares about any of this. However, because these systems are being used by enterprises, they will inevitably be subject to the same legal and social restrictions as traditional enterprise content, and therein lies the rub. Today that rub is significantly limiting endorsement and adoption of consumer-style communication and collaboration facilities around the world, and it will continue to do so until the content management industry and its customers develop protocols and policies to address its issues.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation.
  • Would like to talk about the revolution that is beginning in enterprise computing. This revolution is being driven by changes that originate in the consumer IT space.At the same time, I want to make sure that it is understood what I am saying about this revolution in the context of capture.
  • The first thing we need to keep in mind is that the kind of migration we are talking about toward systems of engagement cannot occur in a world in which our processes remain choked with paper.
  • Organizations continue to print, copy and fax more than a trillion pages of office paper each year (Infotrends).
  • According to CNN, organizations use paper printouts to archive 62% of important documents (CNN, 3-18-2010).
  • 12 billion pages will be generated via printing from mobile devices. Printable web content will increase 3X by 2012 (The Independent, 10-20-2010)
  • While organizations have made progress in reducing paper consumption, our research indicates that despite everything we have done, in only 4 of 10 organizations is paper consumption is declining. Over 30% of organizations report that paper consumption is still increasing.
  • The first thing we need to keep in mind is that the kind of migration we are talking about toward systems of engagement cannot occur in a world in which our processes remain choked with paper.
  • The second thing we need to remember is that even in organizations that have implemented some form of capture technology – and it seems like we have been doing this forever, still the market and end users are at a relatively immature stage.
  • 66% of organizations that are scanning are doing so principally to a static archive – essentially a file cabinet replacement. 50% are manually indexing the information in this electronic file cabinet. Only 16% of the organizations we surveyed are actually scanning to process. The number is larger among organizations with more than 1,000 employees – 27% -- but still remarkably low. And keep in mind that this is among organizations that are actually doing scanning – it doesn’t even count those organizations that are still mired in the paper file-cabinet era.
  • This is all the more frustrating because as we’ve noted in previous studies, the ROI of capture increases as the technology is pushed from archives into processes. 39% report an ROI of 12 months or less; 60% report an ROI within 18 months. Among the various ECM technologies, users cite scanning more than any other technology as the top ROI generator.
  • This is all the more frustrating because as we’ve noted in previous studies, the ROI of capture increases as the technology is pushed from archives into processes. 39% report an ROI of 12 months or less; 60% report an ROI within 18 months. Among the various ECM technologies, users cite scanning more than any other technology as the top ROI generator.
  • The first thing we need to keep in mind is that the kind of migration we are talking about toward systems of engagement cannot occur in a world in which our processes remain choked with paper.
  • Looking only at SharePoint for a minute as a proxy for the broader universe of collaborative technologies, some disturbing trends emerge – trends that if not addressed, will limit the effectiveness of these systems to achieve their full potential.
  • Looking only at SharePoint for a minute as a proxy for the broader universe of collaborative technologies, some disturbing trends emerge – trends that if not addressed, will limit the effectiveness of these systems to achieve their full potential.
  • Looking only at SharePoint for a minute as a proxy for the broader universe of collaborative technologies, some disturbing trends emerge – trends that if not addressed, will limit the effectiveness of these systems to achieve their full potential.
  • We can’t just yell “Stop, the sky is falling” and use control and risk as blunt instruments to halt or slow social initiatives within our organizations. That is a recipe for irrelevance that will look just as foolish 5 years from now as those who 20 years ago said there was no business relevance of e-mail or who 10 years ago said the average employee couldn’t be trusted with access to the internet.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. in the world of Systems of Engagement – no one on the user side cares about any of this. However, because these systems are being used by enterprises, they will inevitably be subject to the same legal and social restrictions as traditional enterprise content, and therein lies the rub. Today that rub is significantly limiting endorsement and adoption of consumer-style communication and collaboration facilities around the world, and it will continue to do so until the content management industry and its customers develop protocols and policies to address its issues.
  • How do our concepts of control and governance need to change to deal with the new world of systems of engagement?
  • How can organizations balance collaboration and agility with security and privacy considerations?
  • Given that technology policy and regulation always lag technology practice, what kind of obstacles do outdated policies and regulations pose to rapid implementation of social business systems?
  • In an environment in which we increasingly expect employees to be available 365/24/7, how do we deal with the inevitable resultant blurring of lines between what is organizational and what is personal?
  • I would like to spend my 30 minutes with you talking about 2 things. The first is the revolution in computing that is currently going on in the consumer space, and the impact that this will inevitably have on enterprise IT. The second is the impact that this revolution will have on the capture and enterprise capture space and the huge opportunities this represents for everyone in this room. The opportunities are massive – both for those who sell or package capture and content solutions and for those of who are charged with implementing those solutions.

Mapping the Future of Enterprise IT and Enterprise Capture Mapping the Future of Enterprise IT and Enterprise Capture Presentation Transcript

  • Mapping the Future ofEnterprise IT and Enterprise Capture
  • Mapping the Future ofEnterprise IT and Enterprise Capture
    John ManciniPresident, AIIME-mail: johnmancini@aiim.orgTwitter: @jmancini77
    Blog = Digital Landfill
  • www.aiim.org
  • To get a copy of all original reports used in this presentation, text
    AIIM and your email to 22333.
    Like this…
    AIIM johnmancini@aiim.org
    22333
  • To get a copy of all original reports used in this presentation,text AIIMand your email to 22333.
  • To get a copy of all original reports used in this presentation,text AIIMand your email to 22333.
  • A Future History of Content Management
  • Systems of Record
  • Systems of Record
    Command and control
    Transaction-oriented
    Document-centric
    Limited deployment
    Central IT-provisioned
    The Last Two Decades of Enterprise IT
  • The flow of IT innovation during the past two decades
  • Seth Godin:
    “It’s human nature to imagine that the future will be just like the present, but with cooler uniforms and flying cars.”
  • 1 -- real time connectivity
    2 -- smart & geo-aware mobile devices
    3 -- ubiquitous & cheap bandwidth
  • The flow of IT innovation over the past 5 years…
  • Technology touches everyone.
    Everyone carries technology expectations into the workplace.
    Why do I feel so powerful as a consumer and so lame as an employee?
    Photo source = http://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/5225049493/
  • How Does This Change CEO Expectations of IT?
    Reinvent Customer Relationships
    Honor your customers above all else
    Use two-way communication to stay in sync with customers
    Profit from the information explosion
    Build Operating Dexterity
    Simplify whenever possible
    Manage systemic complexity
    Promote a mindset of being fast and flexible
    Be “glocal”
    Source = IBM Worldwide Survey of 1,500 CEOs, 2010
    Systems of Engagement
  • Invest in new Systems of Engagement.
    Do this by reducing the cost of our legacy systems.
    But don’t forget to keep us out of trouble.
    The New CIO Imperative
  • Systems of Engagement
  • Systems of Engagement
    Systems of Record
  • The Next Decade of Enterprise IT
    Systems of Engagement
    Systems of Record
    Command and control
    Open and accessible
    Transaction-oriented
    Interaction-oriented
    Document-centric
    User-centric
    Limited deployment
    Ubiquitous deployment
    Central IT-provisioned
    Self-provisioned
  • Enterprise Capture and Systems of Engagement
  • 1 -- Systems of Engagement reinforce the need for vigilance in getting rid of paper.
  • Organizations continue to print, copy and fax more than a trillion pages of office paper each year.
    -- Infotrends
    Photo source = http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcfarlandmo/3274597033/
  • Organizations use paper printouts to archive 62% of important documents.
    -- CNN, 3-18-2010
  • 12 billion pages will be generated via printing from mobile devices.
    Printable web content will increase 3X by 2012.
    -- The Independent, 10-20-2010
    Photo source = http://www.flickr.com/photos/tomsun/3859690596/
  • Would you say that the consumption of paper and/or number of photocopies in your organization is…
    SOURCE = AIIM, N=418, 10+emps, no trade
  • 2 -- Systems of Engagement remind us how far we still have to go re: enterprise capture.
  • A mature technology, but deployment still in its infancy…
    Many organizations – especially SMEs – are only just arriving at an awareness of capture…
    Many larger organizations familiar with capture from a departmental “scan to archive” perspective are only just beginning to explore enterprise capability…
  • How would you describe the highest level of image capture maturity in your business unit?
    Source = AIIM, N=418, 10+emps, no trade
  • Which of your enterprise systems are capture enabled and integrated at a process level?
    Source = AIIM, N=342, 10+emps, no trade
  • What payback period would you say you have achieved or are likely to achieve from your investments in scanning and capture?
    Source = AIIM, N=343
  • Scanning
    DM
    Capture
    Workflow
    ERM
    Collaboration
    Ent Search
    Forms
    BPM
    E-discovery
    None
    In your organization, which three of the following aspects of ECM have produced the highest return on investment?
    (Max. THREE)
    Source = AIIM, N=306
  • 3 -- Systems of Engagement remind us that capture needs to be integrated into our social and collaboration strategy, or we will wind up back in the land of silos.
  • 37%
    “SharePoint is our first significant implementation of ECM.”
    Source = AIIM, N=436 SharePoint using or planning
  • 58%
    “We are not using SharePoint to store scanned image files.”
    Source = AIIM, N=436 SharePoint using or planning
  • 9%
    “We are using images in SharePoint in a workflow environment.”
    Source = AIIM, N=436 SharePoint using or planning
  • 4 -- Systems of Engagement will force us to change the way we think about control and governance.
  • Systems of Engagement
    Systems of Record
    Governance
    Classification
    Compliance
    Technology
    Security
    Standards and Best Practices
  • How do our concepts of control and governance need to change to deal with the new world of systems of engagement?
    Photo source = http://www.flickr.com/photos/marcobellucci/3534516458/
  • How can organizations balance collaboration and agility with security and privacy considerations?
  • Given that technology policy and regulation always lag technology practice, what kind of obstacles do outdated policies and regulations pose to rapid implementation of social business systems?
  • In an environment in which we increasingly expect employees to be available 365/24/7, how do we deal with the inevitable resultant blurring of lines between what is organizational and what is personal?
  • To get a copy of all original reports used in this presentation, text
    AIIM and your email to 22333.
    Like this…
    AIIM johnmancini@aiim.org
    22333
  • Mapping the Future ofEnterprise IT and Enterprise Capture
    John ManciniPresident, AIIME-mail: johnmancini@aiim.orgTwitter: @jmancini77
    Blog = Digital Landfill