Group 3 innovation report

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Group 3 innovation report

  1. 1.                                                                                               Green  Group   Harvard  Summer  School   Cross-­‐Border  Innovation   Prof.  Iris  Berdrow   7/25/2013   Team  Members   Angeli,  Stefano   Dall’Osso,  Claudia   Melhorn,  Carine   Winkler,  Jean-­‐Luc   Wu,  Elizabeth   2013     Innovation  Report    
  2. 2.   2   Table  of  Contents   Executive  Summary  ................................................................................................................................................................  3   Creating  the  Organization  ....................................................................................................................................................  4   Name  .....................................................................................................................................................................  4   Competition  ........................................................................................................................................................  4   Innovation  Plan  Name  ....................................................................................................................................  5   Logo  Creation  .....................................................................................................................................................  5   Mission  Creation  ...............................................................................................................................................  5   Organizational  Chart  and  Responsibilities  .............................................................................................  6   Strategic  Analysis  ....................................................................................................................................................................  7   Stakeholder  Analysis  ......................................................................................................................................  7   Strategic  Objectives  .........................................................................................................................................  7   Performance  Indicators  .................................................................................................................................  8   Ideation  and  Development  ..................................................................................................................................................  9   Ideation  Process  Design  .................................................................................................................................  9   Development  Process  Design  .......................................................................................................................  9   Ideation  ............................................................................................................................................................  10   Development  ..................................................................................................................................................  11   Commercialization  ..............................................................................................................................................................  12   Prototype  Building  and  Testing  ...............................................................................................................  12   Results  Creation  ............................................................................................................................................  13   Commercialization  .......................................................................................................................................  13     Appendix   Creating  the  Organization  –  additional  Information  ...................................................................................................  I   Ideation  and  Development  –  additional  Information  .................................................................................................  II   Problem  Identification  ..................................................................................................................................  II   Flow  Chart  of  Ideation  and  Development  Process  ..............................................................................  III   Survey  Results  .................................................................................................................................................  IV   Project  Management  .......................................................................................................................................  V   Sources  .....................................................................................................................................................................................  VI   Literature  ..........................................................................................................................................................  VI   Websites  ............................................................................................................................................................  VI        
  3. 3.   3   Executive  Summary   Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  is  a  Cambridge,  MA  based  designer,  developer,  and  producer  of  eco-­‐friendly  toys.  Mobius  Toy,   Inc.  aims  to  foster  interactive  learning  for  children  using  innovating  concepts  and  sustainable  technology.       As  a  recent  start-­‐up  company  founded  by  entrepreneurs  Stefano  Angeli,  Claudia  Dall’Osso,  Carine  Melhorn,     Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler  and  Elizabeth  Wu,  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  strives  to  differentiate  itself  from  current  competitors  in   the  industry  by  providing  customized  products  that  anticipate  and  respond  to  needs  of  parents  and  children   in  a  specific  market  niche.     Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  strives  to  promote  creative  thinking,  design  thinking  as  well  as  cultural  diversity,  believing   that   these   aspects   translate   to   end   products   that   highly   satisfy   customers,   brings   return   on   investment   to   shareholders,  and  attracts  the  best  talents  to  remain  in  and  become  a  part  of  the  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  brand.     In  the  following  report,  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  is  pleased  to  present  their  most  recent  innovative  project,  “Green   Challenge.”   The   “Green   Challenge”   is   a   game   that   lets   you   share   the   most   fun   and   eco-­‐friendly   challenge   activities  amongst  your  classmates,  or  play  it  at  home  with  your  family.  Players  learn  actionable  tips  on  how  to   protect   the   environment   by   completing   a   sustainability   plan.     The   player   or   team   that   completes   the   sustainability  plan  in  the  shortest  time  frame  wins  the  game!     By   closely   following   the   innovation   funnel   concept1,  the  report  will  provide  an  overview   on   how   Mobius   Toy,   Inc.   product   life   cycle   evolved   from   idea   generation   to   commercialization,  key  actions  and  stage  gate   process   undertaken   to   manage   goals   and   objectives,  and  how  innovative  concepts  were   applied   throughout   this   journey.   This   report   addresses   why   Mobius   Toy,   Inc.   chose   to   invest  in  this  project,  how  its  plans  and  goals   are   being   realized,   and   what   the   company   learned  from  it.         About  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.       Our  business  model:  Make  profit  by  selling  toys  to  primarily  educational  industries,  expand  to  family  unit   Our   Leadership   model:   Decentralized.   Directors   are   provided   with   wide   autonomy   to   nurture   creative   thinking.   Our   promise   to   our   employees:  Encourage  creative  thinking  by  implementing  a  no  judgment  zone  on  all   new  ideas.   Our  promise  to  our  customer:  Quality  products  with  a  focus  on  fostering  educational  values  in  a  fun  way                                                                                                                                                 1  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  69.   Actions   Teams   Goals   Results   Communities  
  4. 4.   4   Creating  the  Organization   The   Organization   Mobius   Toy,   Inc.   was   created   by   choosing   a   name,   logo,   mission   statement,   and   organizational  chart  while  considering  the  competitive  environment.   Name   A  mobius  strip  is  a  loop,  often  made  with  paper,  twisted  in  a  particular  way  that  gives  it  an  infinite   surface.2  This  name  and  the  nature  of  the  loop  imply  infinite  possibilities,  never-­‐ending  ideas,  and   limitless   creativity.     Because   it   is   often   made   out   of   paper,   this   name   also   incorporates   our   company’s  theme  of  sustainability.       Competition   The   following   table   will   show   three   selected   competitors   for   the   benchmarking   process   to   help   us   find   a   market  niche  that  is  worth  exploiting.    In  addition,  a  detailed  study  of  the  market’s  key  players  will  help  us   understand  the  market  and  thus  results  in  a  better  positioning  process  of  the  company.    By  evaluating  our   competitors’  previous  behavior,  we  will  not  only  be  able  to  learn  from  their  best  practices  but  also  forecast   their  future  behavior,  which  will  be  a  key  driver  for  innovation.    Depending  on  our  competitors’  strategy,  it   will   be   necessary   to   focus   on   both   radical   and   incremental   innovations   to   maintain   and   even   expand   our   market  share.3     Name Website Mission  statement One  Earth   Games  LTD     http://www.gogreenb oardgame.co.uk/Go_ Green/The_Game.ht ml   Family  board  game  that  is  packed  full  of  fun,  humor,  and  excitement.     LeapFrog http://www.leapfrog. com/en/index.html LeapFrog   is   a   leading   designer,   developer   and   marketer of   innovative,   technology-­‐based   educational   products   and   related   proprietary   content.   LeapFrog   is   100%   focused   on   developing   products   that   will   provide   the   most   engaging,  effective  learning  experience  –  for all  ages,  in  school  or  home,  around   the  world.  We  put  learning  first  –  a philosophy  that  distinguishes  us  from  our   competitors  and  fuels  the  entire  company. Seedling http://www.seedling. co.nz/Default.aspx Our  aim  is  to  create  inspirational  products  that  creates  an  opportunity  for  ideas   and  curiosity  to  grow                                                                                                                                               2  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%B6bius_strip   3  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  12,  23-­‐24,  82-­‐83  and  85.  
  5. 5.   5   Innovation  Plan  Name   In  order  to  cover  the  most  important  aspects  as  well  as  ensure  a  clear  communication  and  understanding   among  all  stakeholders,  the  innovation  plan  will  be  named  the  following:                   Logo  Creation   The  logo  of  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  is  a  circle  of  folded  paper,  which  reflects  both  the  name  of  the  company  and  the   meaning  behind  it.4  It  features  a  recognizable  shape  and  is  designed  to  work  in  color  as  well  as  in  gray  scale   and  black/white  in  multiple  scales.5  In  fact,  it  looks  like  two  tangled  Mobius  strips.   A  font  of  the  company’s  name  was  also  created,  which  incorporates  our  logo  and  will  be  displayed  on  our   packaging,  storefronts,  and  business  correspondence  (like  letterheads,  presentations,  etc.).  This  will  ensure  a   consistent,  recognizable  branding  of  the  company.   Mission  Creation   Our   mission   statement   focuses   on   conveying   our   company’s   core   business   purpose   to   our   main  target  group  by  stating  the   technology  and  philosophy  used   to  add  value  to  our  customers.6     Creativity   methods   such   as   brainstorming   of   values   to   be   included   and   in-­‐depth   discussions   both   online   and   during   in-­‐person   meetings   finally  ensured  a  commitment  of   all   team   members   to   the   statement  above.7                                                                                                                                             4  Business  Branding  Strategy.   5 The  logo  development  process  is  displayed  in  detail  in  the  appendix. 6  Entrepreneur,  2003  and  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  89.   7  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  53  and  77.   company’s  name   time  horizon   plan’s  purpose  
  6. 6.   6   Organizational  Chart  and  Responsibilities   The  organization  consists  of  the  following  directors:     The   CEO   represents   the   overall   company   and   makes   final   legal   decisions.   All   directors   are   responsible   for   their   departments.   They   supervise   the   outsourced   activities  and  detect  new  possibilities   that   improve   our   processes   in   order   to  add  value  to  our  products  and  thus   to   our   customers.   To   encourage   innovation   through   creative   collaboration,   we   arranged   the   departments  around  a  creativity  think   tank   called   the   “playground.”   This   is   the   place   where   new   ideas   are   presented,   discussed,   and   evaluated.   In   order   to   realize   these   ideas,   employees   and   external   consultants   are   brought   together,   guided   by   the   creativity   manager   and   playground   gatekeeper,   to   enable   cross-­‐ departmental  teamwork.           John  Doe   • CEO   Claudia  Dall'Osso   • Creativity  Manager  and  Playground  Gatekeeper   Carine  Melhorn   • Finance  and  Legal  Operations  Director   Elizabeth  Wu   • Operations  and  QC  Director   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   • Marketing  Director   Stefano  Angeli   • Prototype  Ideation  Director  
  7. 7.   7   Strategic  Analysis   The   strategic   management   process   is   defined   by   three   interrelated   elements:   strategic   analysis,   strategic   choice,   and   strategic   implementation.8  To   fulfill   all   stakeholder   needs   and   consequently   run   a   successful   business,   an   analysis   of   the   stakeholders   has   to   be   conducted.   As   the   next   step,   our   overall   goals   must   be   defined   in   a   more   detailed   way   in   order   to   accomplish   them.   A   successful   evaluation   of   the   company’s   performance  is  only  possible  due  to  the  exact  measurements  expressed  in  our  performance  indicators  below.9   Stakeholder  Analysis   The  stakeholders  of  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  are  diverse  and  represent  a  variety  of  different  requirements,  displayed   in  the  table  below,  that  they  expect  the  company  to  achieve  and  deliver10.   Group   Title   Responsible   Name  of  the   stakeholders   Title  of  the  requirement   Individual  responsible  for   reporting  the  requirement   Customers   Parents:  impart  knowledge  and  eco-­‐friendly  values  to   children   Claudia  Dall'Osso   Customers   Children:   provide   a   fun   way   to   interact   with   friends   while  learning   Claudia  Dall'Osso,  Stefano   Angeli   Suppliers   Maintain  reliable  long-­‐term  relationships   Elizabeth  Wu   Suppliers   Maintain  high  satisfaction  with  above-­‐market  payment   terms   Elizabeth  Wu   Shareholders   return   on   profit   /   return   on   sales   /   return   on   investment   Carine  Melhorn   Shareholders   Establish  a  positive  corporate  image   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   Employees   Develop   a   wide   range   of   skills   for   all   employees   and   promote  employee  diversity   All  directors,  CEO   Employees   Reward  idea  creator   All  directors,  CEO   Community   Encourage  local  employment   All  directors,  CEO   Community   Partner   with   a   local   environmental   organization   and   donate  part  of  profits  to  the  organization   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   Competitors   Maintain   competitive   market   shares   in   our   core   competencies   Carine  Melhorn,  Jean-­‐Luc   Winkler   Competitors   Engage  in  fair  play  and  transparent  practices   CEO   Strategic  Objectives   Setting  up  objectives  will  help  to  keep  track  of  the  achievement  of  the  overall  company’s  vision  and  mission   statement  over  a  planning  period.11   Group   Title   Responsible   Label   of   the   strategic  thrust   Title  of  the  objective   Individual   responsible   for   reporting  the  objective   Workforce   Ensure  employees/consultants  satisfaction   All  directors   Workforce   Periodically  assess  that  all  directors  have  adequate  resources  to   meet  target  objectives   CEO                                                                                                                                           8  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  76.   9  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  78.   10  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  77.   11  Ibid.  
  8. 8.   8   Workforce   Ensure   that   internal   creative   ideas   and   suggestions   are   incorporated  in  a  timely  manner   All  directors   Finance   Ensure   a   fair   and   transparent   bid-­‐process   for   suppliers   to   review  status  of  submitted  service  proposals   Carine  Melhorn   Finance   Increase  profitability  of  company   Carine  Melhorn   Finance   Build  a  positive  company  image   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   Quality   Select   vendors   who   adhere   to   a   minimum   of   2   forest   certifications   [FSC   (Forest   Stewardship   Council),   SFI   (Sustainable   Forestry   Initiative),   PEFC   (Programme   for   the   Endorsement   of   Forest   Certification),   or   ATF   (American   Tree   Farm)]   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   Quality   Ensure   customer   satisfaction   by   producing   high-­‐quality   toys   made  with  safe  and  natural  products   Elizabeth  Wu,  Stefano   Angeli   Performance  Indicators   The  following  selection  of  performance  indicators  have  been  chosen  to  ensure  the  executive  management  of   Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  Furthermore,  they  will  help  to  fulfill  the  mission  as  the  overall  goal  of  the  corporation  by   making  the  company’s  goal  tangible.12   Title   Unit   Target   Responsible   Title  of  the   indicator   Unit  of  measurement   Target  value  of  the  measurement   Individual  responsible  for   reporting  the  indicator   Employee   satisfaction   Combination   of   employee   retention   rate   and   absenteeism  rate   Employee   retention   rate   of   85%,   absenteeism  rate  of  under  2%   Claudia  Dall’Osso,  all   directors   Customer   satisfaction   Negative   customer   feedback   and/or  product  returns.   Less  than  5%  of  customers  leaving   negative  feedback  and/or  returning   products   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler,   Elizabeth  Wu   Profitability   Return  on  Investment   35%  ROI  after  3  years  of  operation   Carine  Melhorn   Corporate   image   Positive   media   monitoring   rate   Achieve  a  minimum  of  90%  positive   company   mentions   in   the   media   (online  media  and  industry  related   print  media),  no  negative  company   mentions   Jean-­‐Luc  Winkler   We  chose  a  variety  of  both  financial  and  non-­‐financial  macro  indicators  to  encourage  sustainable  long-­‐term   thinking  as  well  as  a  connection  to  all  our  strategic  objectives.  Furthermore,  over  a  period  of  time  a  trend  can   be  illustrated  (e.g.  by  using  a  performance  chart13)  to  monitor  the  company’s  development  and  track  demand   for  improvement.14                                                                                                                                               12  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  78,  and114.   13  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  119.   14  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  115-­‐116.  
  9. 9.   9   Ideation  and  Development   During   the   ideation   and   development   processes,   Mobius   Toy,   Inc.   will   follow   the   Action   Pathway:   using   creativity   methods,   generating   ideas.   Based   on   our   research   and   market   knowledge,   opportunities   are   recognized  and  developed  into  projects  that  strictly  follow  our  company’s  objectives  within  our  playground   meetings.  After  conducting  several  evaluation  rounds,  we  will  be  able  to  realize  our  projects’  potential  and   gain  valuable  knowledge  through  learning  processes.15   Ideation  Process  Design   The  next  product  of  Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  aims  to  solve  existing  problems  for  parents  and  children.  The  following   process  describes  how  using  common  creativity  tools16  will  identify  existing  problems:       Development  Process  Design   Directors   will   develop   prototype   ideas   to   address   the   chosen   problem   and   vote   on   the   prototype   ideas   in   playground  meetings.    Votes  will  assign  a  value  of  1  to  5  for  each  of  the  following  objectives,  with  1  as  the   worst  rank  and  5  as  the  best.    The  idea  with  the  highest  score  will  be  chosen.   Objectives   Questions  for  consideration   1.  Level  of  innovation   How   different   is   the   product   compared   to   existing   products   in   the   marketplace?   2.  Target  market   What  is  the  size  of  the  target  market  for  a  given  prototype?   3.  Estimated  cost   What  is  the  estimated  cost  of  production  and  marketing?   4.   Educational   value   and   level  of  parent  interest   What  does  this  toy  teach  children?    Will  parents  be  interested  in  buying  it?                                                                                                                                           15  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  132.   16  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  146-­‐147.   Approach   Steps   • Image  visualization  technique:  Show  random  pictures  in  playground  meeting  and  draw  connections  to   potential  problems  (ex.  Picture  of  a  car  can  connect  to  road  safety  for  children)   • Director/employee  suggestions  from  personal  experiences   • Fieldwork:  Observe  children  in  classrooms,  playgrounds,  and  parks   • Identify  key  causes  of  the  problems   Brainstorming   • Deoine  focus  group  and  oind  members  (ex.  Parents,  teachers,  children,  child  psychologists)   • Conduct  focus  group  with  a  facilitator  for  discussion  on  problems/struggles  for  parents  and   children   • Share  and  consolidate  oindings  among  directors   Focus  group   and/or  expert   interviews   • Organize  and  cluster  ideas  to  provide  more  structure   • Present  how  ideas  connect  or  differ  in  a  visual  manner  Mind-­‐mapping   • Observe  buying  behavior  in  toy  stores  or  sections   • Identify  currently  existing  problem-­‐solving  products  Market  research  
  10. 10.   10   5.   Level   of   fun   and   interaction   How   entertaining   is   the   toy?     Does   it   require   interaction   with   another   person?   6.  Eco-­‐friendliness   Can  the  toy  be  made  of  eco-­‐friendly  and  sustainably  harvested  materials?     How  big  is  the  estimated  carbon  footprint  of  its  production?     Ideation   The   following   ideas   for   prototypes   were   selected   to   match   with   the   objectives   in   the   next   step.   The   ideas   where  sourced  both  internally  and  externally  of  the  companies  environment.  “New  Knowledge”  was  created   by  our  company’s  internal  employees.  “Innovation  Factories”  like  our  playground  meetings  were  conducted   and  “Customer  Ideas”  were  taken  into  consideration.17   Idea   Description   Champion   1.  Card  Game   Each   pack   comes   with   8   collectible   cards   containing   a   picture/diagram/icon  related  with  environmental  issues.  It  is  played   by  two  children  who  have  to  guess  the  image  on  the  card  by  making   yes/no  questions.  The  one  who  guesses  first  wins.   Stefano   2.   Strategic   Board   Game   This   board   game   requires   at   least   two   players,   who   will   take   on   different   roles:   environmentalist,   corporate   representative,   and   scientist   (researcher).   Each   player   has   certain   responsibilities   and   abilities   designated   by   the   rules.     The   team   of   players   will   work   together   to   try   to   prevent   rapid   deforestation   that   is   occurring   in   different  parts  of  the  world.    Players  will  draw  cards  allowing  them  to   take  action  or  detailing  good  or  bad  events.    For  example,  cards  could   say  that  trees  are  being  cut  down  in  one  region  (bad  event),  or  that   the   environmentalist   (for   example)   can   travel   to   one   area   to   plant   seeds  (good  event),  etc.    The  players  lose  if  the  deforestation  reaches   a   certain   level   in   each   region,   and   they   win   if   they're   able   to   plant   enough  trees  and  the  forests  recover  to  a  designated  level  for  each   region.   Elizabeth   3.   Carbon   Footprint   board  game   The   goal   of   the   game   is   to   reach   the   final   square.   The   player   who   reaches  it  first  wins.  Players  move  from  space  to  space  by  throwing   dice  and  moving  their  pawn  the  corresponding  number  of  steps.  The   various   spaces   contain   actions   that   can   increase   or   decrease   the   carbon  footprint.  When  a  pawn  lands  on  a  cell  with  a  negative  action,   it  will  be  forced  to  go  back  some  spaces  (depending  on  how  much  the   actions   influence   the   carbon   footprint);   vice   versa   a   positive   action   will  allow  the  player  to  move  its  pawn  forward.  Pawns  and  dice  will   be  assembled  through  the  origami  technique.   Claudia   4.  Family  Trivia   The  goal  of  the  game  is  to  test  the  general  level  of  knowledge  of  eco-­‐ friendliness.  The  toy  is  shaped  like  the  company  logo  and  represents   infinite  possibilities  of  making  environmentally  friendly  choices.  The   players   will   either   roll   dice   or   spin   an   arrow   that   will   advance   the   user   on   a   board   that   is   color   coded.   There   are   4   colors,   each   representing   an   environmental   area   such   as   Forestation/Water/   Earth/  Energy.    Users  gain  a  color  card  when  they  respond  correctly   to  a  question.  The  user  that  has  all  4  colors  in  the  shortest  time  frame   wins  the  game.  Users  that  do  not  respond  correctly  have  to  give  up  a   Carine                                                                                                                                           17  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  pp.  139-­‐140.  
  11. 11.   11   color  that  they  have  already  earned.  Other  options  such  as  skipping  a   turn  will  also  be  included  to  continue  motivating  the  game.  The  game   teaches   the   user   to   think   about   the   different   available   choices   in   relation   to   the   environment.   The   target   is   that   players   gain   a   new   understanding   in   a   fun   way   and   begin   to   practice   the   choices   they   have  learned.   5.  Family  Challenge   The   game   revolves   around   fulfilling   tasks   that   are   environmentally   friendly  in  order  to  earn  points  that  are  accumulated  on  a  scoreboard.   The  family  decides  on  specific  measurable  tasks  and  places  markers   next  to  the  place  where  the  task  has  to  be  fulfilled  (e.g.  saving  water   while   showering).   During   a   week,   the   family   plays   the   game   and   collects   points   so   that   a   winner   can   be   awarded   each   week.   In   addition  we  will  provide  an  online  platform  and/or  mobile  app  that   allows  challenges  across  families.  Furthermore  whole  schools  and/or   classes  can  compete  and  earn  prizes  that  we  will  collect  by  sponsors.   Jean-­‐Luc   Development   The  ideas  were  evaluated  by  voting  on  the  ability  to  fulfill  the  objectives.18  Each  Director  voted  by  giving  1  to  5   points,  with  5  being  the  best  score.  The  numbers  represent  the  average  value  of  all  directors’  votes.  Idea  #5   has  the  best  ability  to  meet  the  objectives.                                                                                                                                                   18  O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009,  p.  148.  
  12. 12.   12   Commercialization   In  this  final  phase,  we  are  going  to  finalize  the  winning  idea  by  building  a  prototype,  which  will  be  tested  by   our  prospective  shareholders.     The  final  toy  “Green  Challenge”  consists  of  the  tangible  product  represented  by  the  scoreboard,  which  will  be   sold  in  stores  and  the  additional  online  platform,  that  will  function  as  an  intangible  added  value  service.   Prototype  Building  and  Testing   For  the  prototype  building  and  testing,  we  have  chosen  to  encourage  our  prospective  customers  and  other   stakeholders  to  test  out  the  “Green  Challenge”  and  give  us  feedback  on  how  to  maximize  the  game  experience.     We  created  an  early  prototype  consisting  of  a  scoreboard  in  which  children  could  gain  points  by  performing   eco-­‐friendly   tasks,   and   advance   their   pawn   (an   endangered   animal)   on   the   board.     We   also   discussed   the   creation  of  an  online  platform  to  keep  track  of  points  earned  among  families  and/or  school  classes  that  would   rank  each  team  among  all  participants.    This  website  adds  value  to  the  product  by  encouraging  families  to   increase  eco-­‐friendly  behaviors  and  requires  the  product’s  serial  number  to  log  in.    Participation  in  the  online   competition  could  result  in  a  prize  (seed  packages,  movie  passes,  etc.),  which  is  rewarded  to  highly  ranked   groups  by  lottery  drawing.    Mobius  Toy,  Inc.  would  provide  these  rewards.     A  description  of  the  game  and  a  picture  of  the  prototype  were  emailed  to  over  50  people,  including  parents   that  have  at  least  one  child  between  6  and  10  years  old,  10  teachers,  and  other  experts.  A  brief  description  of   the  online  platform  was  also  given.  The  families  were  asked  to  rank  the  toy’s  performance  from  the  adult’s   point  of  view  as  well  as  from  the  children’s  point  of  view.    In  addition  to  these  rankings,  we  asked  for  general   feedback,  concerns,  and  suggestions.19     The  performance   test  was  conducted  by  asking  two  children  aged  6-­‐10  to  play  the  game  (with  prototype   scoreboard  and  challenges)  for  an  afternoon  and  were  subsequently  asked  a  few  questions  regarding  their   experiences.   Each   challenge   was   thoroughly   explained   with   an   emphasis   on   benefits   for   the   overall   environment,  before  the  child  played  the  game.   Children   Responses   How  fun  was  this  game  for  you?   100%  answered  that  the  game  was  fun   What  did  you  learn  from  this  game?   100%  answered  that  they  learned  that  it  is  important  to  form   eco-­‐friendly  habits.   "I  learned  that  we  need  to  pick  up  trash,  we  need  to  turn  the   lights  off  when  we  leave,  and  I  learned  that  when  we  brush   our  teeth,  we  need  to  turn  off  the  water."   Would  you  play  this  game  again?   100%  yes   What  was  you  favorite  part  of  this  game?   “My  favorite  part  was  playing  the  recycle.”   “I  liked  everything.”   “This  game  reminds  me  of  my  what  my  favorite  character  is   doing  on  TV  and  now  I  can  do  it  too.”     Based  on  feedback,19  we  have  decided  to  modify  our  online  platform.    We  realized  that  the  competitive  aspect   of   the   online   platform   was   not   well-­‐received,   and   we   were   missing   a   direct   link   between   eco-­‐friendly   behaviors  and  environmental  impact.    Therefore,  we  decided  to  make  the  website  an  informative  source  of   environmental  facts.    Families  will  be  able  to  log  in  their  scores  and  see  the  direct  impact  of  their  actions   related  to  their  everyday  environment.  Thus  we  will  give  them  a  tangible  relation  between  their  activities  and   well  known  measurements.    For  example,  one  statement  after  entering  the  scores  could  be  as  follows:                                                                                                                                               19  The  set  of  survey  questions,  responses,  and  suggestions  are  attached  in  the  appendix.  
  13. 13.   13   “The  average  American  family  for  four  can  consume  up  to  400  gallons  of  water  each  day,  which  is  easily  reduced   with  the  tasks  you  have  completed.    By  saving  water  while  taking  a  shower,  you  have  saved  a  month’s  worth  of   drinking  water  for  your  family!  Congratulations!”       It   was   also   mentioned   that   our   game   board   needs   to   be   aesthetically   redesigned   to   be   more   attractive   to   children.   Results  Creation   The  process  requires  the  following  activities:20   Prototype   Building   Submit  Idea  Name     Write  Survey  Questions     Write  Market  Strategy     Toy  Design     Prototype   Testing   Write  Toy  Instructions     Labeling     Packaging     Conduct  Market  Research     Conduct  Market  Performance  Testing     Prototype   QA   Incorporate  Market  Research     Incorporate  Testing  Results     Conduct  Go/No-­‐Go/Go-­‐Back  decisions     Create   Innovation   Report   Convert  Activities  1-­‐4     Team  Conducts  QA     Submit  Report     Commercialization   We  will  start  our  business  as  a  start-­‐up  in  the  Boston  area  by  following  these  steps  to  grow  our  sustainable   business:                                                                                                                                               20  A  full  Gantt-­‐Chart  of  the  commercialization  process  as  activity  #4  is  provided  in  the  appendix,  O’Sullivan  &   Dooley,  2009,  pp.  164-­‐166.       Gain  environmental   association   endorsements  and   partner  with  charity School  Launch Local  Store   Launch Convenience   Store  Launch
  14. 14.   14   1. Reach  out  to  environmental  organizations  and  charities  that  are  willing  to  partner  with  us  to  promote   the  Green  Challenge.   2. Roll  out  the  “Green  Challenge:  Classroom  Version”  across  schools  in  the  Boston  area.    The  toy  will  be   available  for  school  challenges  to  make  it  broadly  available  to  our  target  group.  Hereby  we  will  make   all  elementary  school  children  familiar  with  the  game  and  trigger  broad  attention.   • Increase  exposure.   • Gain  local  recognition.   • Transfer  demand  from  children  in  school  to  families'  homes.   • Circulate  in  schools  for  2  months  to  gain  feedback  from  teachers  and  students  to  incorporate   into  our  Family  Version.   3. Get  local  stores  in  the  Boston  area  (ex.  Stella  Bella  Toys,  independent  bookstores,  etc.)  to  sell  “Green   Challenge:  Family  Version”;  local  stores  will  be  selected  based  on  the  likeliness  to  attract  eco-­‐friendly   parents  and  based  on  the  store  atmosphere  (stores  where  owners/sales  assistants  offer  advices  and   suggestions   to   customers   will   be   preferred   to   take   advantage   of   the   trust   relationships   already   established).   • Benefit  for  local  stores:     • Give  an  environmentally  friendly  touch  to  their  business.  Once  the  toy  gains  huge   recognition  people  will  get  into  their  stores  to  buy  the  toy  and  they  will  be  able  to   offer  their  own  products/services.   • Benefits  for  Mobius:     • Target  environmentally  conscious  groups.   • Engage  local  communities.  Advertise  by  word  of  mouth.   4. Get  chain  stores’  (CVS,  Walgreens)  approval  to  sell  in  the  "cashier  area.”   • Benefit  for  chain  stores:  Extra  revenues  as  "pester  power  item"  sale.   • Benefit  for  Mobius:  Fast  and  huge  expansion  of  distribution  system.     Because  we  are  providing  “Green  Challenge:  Classroom  Version”  for  free  as  part  of  our  marketing  cost,  our   revenue  will  come  from  sales  to  additional  classrooms  and  families  following  the  initial  2-­‐month  launch.    By   creating  a  classroom  version  (instead  of  a  version  for  the  entire  school),  we  can  sell  more  of  the  classroom   versions  to  multiple  classes  within  one  school  if  the  game  catches  on.    We  will  also  create  different  editions  of   the  game,  such  as  the  water   edition,   energy   edition,  and   recycle   edition,  with  different  tasks  so  a  single   classroom  or  a  single  family  can  buy  multiple  editions  if  they  enjoy  the  game.    The  online  platform  will  also   provide  links  between  these  tasks  and  their  environmental  impact  once  the  serial  number  and  points  have   been  entered.    These  different  versions  (classroom  and  family)  and  editions  have  the  potential  to  dramatically   increase  the  number  of  boards  we  sell.     For  the  Family  Version,  we  have  decided  to  price  the  board  at  $9.99  for  the  following  reasons.   • Exceeds  the  cost  of  production  to  ensure  revenue   • Reflects  the  educational  value  of  repetitive  behaviors  that  will  result  in  eco-­‐friendly  habits   • Reflects   the   value   of   the   online   platform   that   provides   link   between   actions   and   environmental   impact       • High  enough  that  the  customer  will  value  the  product  and  think  it  is  worth  buying  (as  opposed  to  a   low  price  which  reflects  poor  quality)   • Not  high  enough  to  deter  customers  who  may  feel  that  it  is  too  expensive  for  a  paper  toy  
  15. 15.     Appendix    
  16. 16.       I   Creating  the  Organization  –  additional  Information           The  logo  includes  two  intertwined  people,  showing  the  interactive   nature  of  our  products.    This  logo  will  be  featured  on  our  products. The  cycle-­‐shaped  form,  reminiscent  of  the  recycle  logo,  and   the  green  color  symbolize  our  commitment  to  sustainability. ü language  ambiguity  error  check ü Easily  pronounced ü Existing  company  congruency grayscale black/white     #78b729 #a5c617 secondary  color  codes:       #008637 #41ab34 primary  color  codes:  
  17. 17.       II     Ideation  and  Development  –  additional  Information   Problem  Identification   Potential  problems  identified  in  ideation  process:     Directors  voted  to  address  the  problem  of  teaching  children  to  respect  and  protect  the  environment.  
  18. 18.       III   Flow  Chart  of  Ideation  and  Development  Process   The  ideation  and  development  process  is  arranged  around  seven  playground  meetings:      
  19. 19.       IV   Survey  Results   Survey  Results-­‐Parents:   Parents   Responses     How  important  is  it  for  you  to  teach  your  children  eco-­‐ friendly  values?  Rate  1-­‐5  (5  is  highest)   Average:  5   Do   you   currently   have   a   way   to   teach   sustainability   to   your  children?  (Yes/No)   40%  No     (For  parents  who  answered  yes,  the  most  common  method   was  learning  by  observing  parents’  behavior)   How  well  does  Green  Challenge  instill  eco-­‐friendly  values   in  children?  Rate  1-­‐5   Average:  3.6   How   useful   is   the   online   platform   that   tracks   family   points?     Rate  1-­‐5   Average:  2.75   How  likely  are  you  to  recommend  the  Green  Challenge  to   a  friend?   Rate  1-­‐5   Average:  2.5   Summary  of  additional  comments/suggestions:   • Competition   between   families   with   online   platform   was   teaching   wrong   values   (tangible   facts   related   to   the   everyday   environment   were   requested)   • Lack  of  direct  connection  between  energy  saved   and  environmental  impact   • Parents  liked  the  idea  of  rewarding  the  repetition   of  action   Survey  Results-­‐Experts:   Experts  (Child  psychologist  and  teachers)   Responses   How  important  do  you  think  it  is  to  teach  6  to  10  years   old  children  eco-­‐friendly  values?  (Rate  1-­‐5,  5  is  highest)   Average:  5   Are  these  concepts  age-­‐appropriate?  (Rate  1-­‐5)   Average:  5   Do   you   currently   have   a   way   to   teach   sustainability   to   children?  (yes/no)   50%  No     (For   yes   responses,   the   method   used   was   telling   stories   about  how  actions  impact  environment)   How  well  does  Green  Challenge  instill  eco-­‐friendly  values   in  children?  Rate  1-­‐5   Average:  4.0   If  we  were  to  produce  a  “Green  Challenge  school  edition”   would  you  suggest  teachers  to  use  it?   Rate  1-­‐5   Average:  4.5   Summary  of  additional  comments/suggestions:   • Fun   idea   but   game   board   must   be   more   entertaining   • Online  competition  may  provide  too  much  stress   on   families   to   meet   a   certain   expectation   (it   should  be  kept  simple)   • Should  reward  whole  family  if  they  achieve  high   score  as  a  group      
  20. 20.       V   Project  Management   This  Gantt-­‐Chart  which  was  created  in  Microsoft  Project  represents  the  activities  executed  in  “Activity  4”.      
  21. 21.       VI   Sources   Literature   O’Sullivan  &  Dooley,  2009   O’Sullivan,   D.,   and   Dooley,   L.   (2009).   “Applying   Innovation.”   Sage   Publication,  Inc.     Websites   Business  Branding  Strategy   http://businessbrandingstrategy.com/logo/why-­‐are-­‐logos-­‐important,   without  publishing  date   Entrepreneur,  2003   http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/65230,  published  10/30/2003    

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