Demystifying the common_core_state_standards

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Inwood 52's presentation on the Common Core State Standards and implications for our school.

Inwood 52's presentation on the Common Core State Standards and implications for our school.

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Transcript

  • 1. Dr. Sal Fernandez
  • 2. The Inwood 52 Journey Designing a coherent and aligned curriculum that promotes thinking, includes higher order skills, and is relevant to the needs of students has been a top priority for teachers at I.S. 52. During the 2010-2011 school year, several of our teachers participated in the CCLS pilot, where they gained a rich understanding of the new standards, as well as building their capacity to deepen curriculum and instruction in order to improve student achievement. These teachers facilitated in-school professional development & training sessions to share best practices learned with other teachers. Our teachers then met in teams to examine our current curriculum guides.
  • 3. The Inwood 52 Journey (Cont.) We used the CCLS to increase the quality of, and to ensure congruence between, our curriculum and assessments. Ultimately, we revised our curriculum guides by developing integrated units of study that include authentic learning opportunities, attend to varied learner needs, and incorporate various assessment tasks.
  • 4. The Inwood 52 Journey (Cont.) More specifically, all classes within the same content and grade level are held to the same standards. For example, all 8th grade ELA students, regardless of class or teacher, will read the same unit text and perform the same assessment tasks throughout the unit. However, teachers will modify and scaffold their instruction depending on the needs of their students.
  • 5. The Inwood 52 Journey (Cont.) Further, in thinking about ways to ensure we reach all learners, we chose to revise our pacing calendars along with our curriculum guides. Our new pacing calendars illustrate the standards that will be addressed weekly through the exploration of guiding questions, relevant topics and key vocabulary, as well as the various assessments that will demonstrate student learning. These new pacing calendars ensure uniformity and continuity, but also allows for the flexibility that is necessary in addressing diverse learning needs. This will ensure high expectations for all.
  • 6. Reading Standards ―Establish a ‗staircase‘ of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read so that all students are ready for the demands of college- and career-level reading no later than the end of high school. ―The standards also require the progressive development of reading comprehension so that students advancing through the grades are able to gain more from whatever they read.
  • 7. Reading (Cont.) Through reading a diverse array of classic and contemporary literature as well as challenging informational texts in a range of subjects, students are expected to build knowledge, gain insights, explore possibilities, and broaden their perspective. Because the standards are building blocks for successful classrooms, but recognize that teachers, school districts and states need to decide on appropriate curriculum, they intentionally do not offer a reading list. Instead, they offer numerous sample texts to help teachers prepare for the school year and allow parents and students to know what to expect at the beginning of the year.
  • 8. Writing  The ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence is a cornerstone of the writing standards, with opinion writing—a basic form of argument— extending down into the earliest grades.  Research—both short, focused projects (such as those commonly required in the workplace) and longer term in depth research —is emphasized throughout the standards but most prominently in the writing strand since a written analysis and presentation of findings is so often critical.
  • 9. Writing (Cont.)  Annotated samples of student writing accompany the standards and help establish adequate performance levels in writing arguments, informational / explanatory texts, and narratives in the various grades.
  • 10. Math For over a decade, research studies of mathematics education in high-performing countries have pointed to the conclusion that the mathematics curriculum in the United States must become substantially more focused and coherent in order to improve mathematics achievement in this country. To deliver on the promise of common standards, the standards must address the problem of a curriculum that is ―a mile wide and an inch deep.‖ These Standards are a substantial answer to that challenge.
  • 11. Ten Anchor Standards forReading The grades 6–12 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.
  • 12. Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
  • 13. Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
  • 14. Integration of Knowledge andIdeas  7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*  8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.  9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
  • 15. Range of Reading and Level ofText Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
  • 16. College and Career ReadinessAnchor Standards for Writing The grades 6–12 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.
  • 17. Text Types and Purposes1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.2. Write informative / explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well- chosen details, and well- structured event sequences.
  • 18. Production and Distribution ofWriting4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
  • 19. Research to Build and PresentKnowledge7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • 20. Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • 21. Mathematical Practices The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students. These practices rest on important ―processes and proficiencies‖ with longstanding importance in mathematics education.
  • 22. Mathematical Practices1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.4. Model with mathematics.
  • 23. Mathematical Practices (Cont.)5. Use appropriate tools strategically.6. Attend to precision.7. Look for and make use of structure.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
  • 24. 52‘s First StepOur first step was to choose the anchor standard in reading that we were going to focus on. We chose anchor standard 1, which states:―Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.‖
  • 25. After Choosing TheStandardAfter choosing the anchor standard, we went back and selected the key reading standards for literature by grade level that are embedded in our unit maps. For example, we selected the following:6th grade Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.7th grade Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.8th grade Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • 26. After Choosing The Standard#2We also chose key reading standards for informational text by grade level that are embedded in our unit maps. For example, we selected the following:6th grade Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.7th grade Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.8th grade Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • 27. The Writing AnchorStandards Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • 28. Selecting Key Standards 6th2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.e. Establish and maintain a formal style.f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
  • 29. Selecting Key Standards 7th2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.e. Establish and maintain a formal style.f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
  • 30. Selecting Key Standards 8th1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence.d. Establish and maintain a formal style.e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
  • 31. Selecting Key Standards 8(Cont.)8th grade1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.e. Establish and maintain a formal style.f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
  • 32. Math Key Practice StandardIn all grades, we chose to use:―Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.‖Mathematically proficient students: Understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, & results in constructing arguments. Make conjectures & build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. Analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. Justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. Reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument— explain what it is. Students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
  • 33. Alignment in Inwood 52 Citing and finding evidence in text aligned to what happens in the classroom in all content areas Creates rich discussion in classroom Concentration on finding evidence and making concrete arguments leads to higher cognitive demand
  • 34. Guiding Questions What materials will the teachers use during the lesson? How will the teacher present the content and include selected standards in a manner that raises student interests and that engages them in learning? What will the students have to know and do by the end of the lesson to show that they ―got it!‖?