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The Information Cycle...
The Information Cycle...
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The Information Cycle...
The Information Cycle...
The Information Cycle...
The Information Cycle...
The Information Cycle...
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The Information Cycle...

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Extended presentation of the information cycle created for Honors 110. Created by J. Rinalducci

Extended presentation of the information cycle created for Honors 110. Created by J. Rinalducci

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  • The Information Cycle is a visual model of how information is developed and distributed. Can be applied to an event, era, social movement, discovery… Will go over how the documentation of events is distributed & how researchers can find this documentation
  • The Information Cycle is a visual model of how information is developed and distributed. Can be applied to an event, era, social movement, discovery… Will go over how the documentation of events is distributed & how researchers can find this documentation
  • Using Hurricane Katrina as a example… We can track the development of information through the sources…from television reports & newspapers to scholarly journals & books simply by focusing on a specific event.
  • Using this timeframe as our base, we can track the creation of information sources
  • Tracking timeline through information output Information SourcesTV, Radio, Internet=Same Day Newspapers=Day After Magazines=Weeks Scholarly Journals=Months Books=Years
  • Timeframe: Immediate Images from Facebook, personal website Access through Google, etc.
  • Timeframe: As early as the SAME DAY Images taken from television (including news programs), radio Access through Google, television, radio (NOTE: took above TV screenshots from Vanderbilt Archive)
  • Starting day after event Components to look for: Authors (staff writers, syndicated columnists), images, text, etc. Access: print copies of newspapers, Google (to an extent), databases like Lexis Nexis (with time delay)Open up discussion
  • Noteworthy:Authors, images, text, subjects covered, etc.___________________________________ Time frame: week/weeks Access to information: Research Databases (Can mention popular examples you use), Google (to an extent)
  • Time frame: 6 months+ Noteworthy: Subjects covered, text, images, ads, etc.Access to information: Research Databases (examples), limited access through Google Note: Differences between Professional & Popular/ScholarlyENR: Engineering News Record as example________________________________________
  • Time frame: 6 months+ Note: Author info, abstract, original research, images, references, etc. Access to information: Research Databases (interdisciplinary & subject specific)
  • Noteworthy: Publication timeframe Topics, content, etc. Parts of the book: Table of Contents, Index, etc.______________ Time frame: 2+ years Access to information: Library Catalog
  • NOTED ABOVE:Keep this timeline in mind when you… Look for background information on class readings (ex: Rosa Parks & the Bus Boycotts) Research your chosen paper topic for this class Write research papers for other classes Analyze the “information overload” for current events (ex: Oil Spill off the Gulf Coast)
  • CYCLE OF INFORMATION: Putting It All Together From the occurrence of an event, era, social movement, discovery. To the documentation of the event, era, etc. To how the evidence is disseminated. And how researchers (and term paper writers) can find this documentation.Go to library homepageShow links for catalog for finding books, etcShow links to research databaseHighlight Ask-a-Librarian (IM, desk, phone, InfoGuides, etc.)
  • SHOWING LIVE WEBPAGE: Highlight links for Catalog, Research Databases, InfoGuides, IM, Liaison Librarians, Hours/locations, Reserves, WRLC…
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Information Cycle<br />…how today’s events are tomorrow’s information.<br />Bichel, Rebecca, Debora Cheney, Sylvia M. DeSantis, and Jiyeon Ryu. “The Information Lifecycle.” Pennsylvania State University. PowerPoint. 2004. 9 August 2010. <http://www.libraries.psu.edu/instruction/infocycle/infocycle.html>. <br />
    • 2. The Information Cycle<br /><ul><li> The Information Cycle is a visual model of how information is developed and distributed.
    • 3. Can be applied to an event, era, social movement, discovery…
    • 4. Will go over how the documentation of events is distributed & how researchers can find this documentation</li></li></ul><li>Hurricane KatrinaAugust 29-September 1, 2005<br />A Story Unfolds…<br />Using Hurricane Katrina as a example…We can track the development of information through the sources…from television reports & newspapers to scholarly journals & books simply by focusing on a specific event. <br />
    • 5. Event Timeline Using this timeframe as our base, we can track the creation of information sources<br />Day After<br />Same Day<br />Years<br />Weeks<br />Months<br />
    • 6. Information Timeline Tracking timeline through information output<br />TV, Radio<br />Newspapers<br />Facebook, blogs…<br />Books…Documentaries…<br />Popular Magazines<br />Scholarly Journals<br />Trade Magazines<br />
    • 7. Blogs, Facebook…<br />Personal website: http://wilddogdigital.com<br /><ul><li>Timeframe: Immediate
    • 8. Images from Facebook, personal website
    • 9. Access through Google, etc.</li></li></ul><li>TV & Radio<br /><ul><li>Timeframe: As early as the SAME DAY
    • 10. Images taken from television (including news programs), radio
    • 11. Access through Google, television, radio (NOTE: took above TV screenshots from Vanderbilt Archive)</li></ul>"The only [Katrina victims] we're seeing on television are the scumbags." –"The Glenn Beck Program," Sept. 9, 2005 <br />
    • 12. Newspapers<br /><ul><li>Starting day after event
    • 13. Components to look for: Authors (staff writers, syndicated columnists), images, text, etc.
    • 14. Access: print copies of newspapers, Google (to an extent), databases like Lexis Nexis (with time delay)</li></li></ul><li>Popular Magazines<br /><ul><li>Time: week/weeks
    • 15. Noteworthy: </li></ul>Authors, images, text, subjects covered, etc.<br /><ul><li> Access to information: </li></ul>**Research Database (like Academic Search Complete & Proquest Research Library)<br />**Google (ONLY to an extent)<br />
    • 16. Trade Magazines<br /><ul><li>Time frame: 6 months+
    • 17. Note: Subjects covered, text, images, ads, etc.
    • 18. Access to information: Research Databases (examples), limited access through Google
    • 19. ENR: Engineering News Record as example</li></li></ul><li>Scholarly Journals<br /><ul><li>Time frame: 6 months+
    • 20. Note: Author, abstract, original research, images, references, etc.
    • 21. Access to information: Research Databases (interdisciplinary & subject specific)</li></li></ul><li>Books<br />2007<br />2010<br />2010<br />Time frame: 2+ years<br />Note:<br /><ul><li> Publication timeframe
    • 22. Topics, content, etc.
    • 23. Parts of the book: Table of Contents, Index, etc.</li></ul>Access to information: Library Catalog <br />2008<br />
    • 24. Keep this timeline in mind when you…<br />Look for background information on class readings (ex: Rosa Parks & the Bus Boycotts)<br />Research your chosen paper topic for this class<br />Write research papers for other classes<br />Analyze the “information overload” for current events (ex: Oil Spill off the Gulf Coast)<br />*This is NOT a strict timeline…Scholarly research can lead to popular magazine and newspaper articles…It’s ALL connected!<br />
    • 25. Taking this Timeline to the Library Website…<br />CYCLE OF INFORMATION: Putting It All Together<br /><ul><li> From the occurrence of an event, era, social movement, discovery</li></ul>to the documentation of the event, era, etc.<br /><ul><li> How the evidence is disseminated</li></ul>and how researchers (and term paper writers) can find this documentation<br />http://library.gmu.edu<br />
    • 26. LibraryWebsite<br />Go to library homepage<br />Note links for catalog for finding books, etc<br />Note links to research database<br />Check out Ask-a-Librarian (IM, desk, phone, InfoGuides, etc.)<br />

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