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American Art in the 1930s
 

American Art in the 1930s

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    American Art in the 1930s American Art in the 1930s Presentation Transcript

    • ARTH 471/599Art from the 1930s
      Date
      Time
    • Library Resources
      Library Website:
      Ask-a-Librarian-> IM…
      InfoGuides
      Library catalog:
      Books
      E-books (Net Library)
      DVD, VHS
      WRLC
    • More Library Resources
      Research Databases
      Arts Databases
      • Art Full Text
      • Bibliography History of Art (BHA)
      • Design & Applied Arts (DAAI)
      • ARTBibliographies Modern
      • Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals
      • ARTstor
    • More Library Databases
      General Databases
      • Academic Search Complete (exs: Digital Creativity, Visual Studies, Visual Anthropology)
      • ProQuest Research Library (ex: British Journal of Photography, Journal of Glass Studies)
      • Wilson Omnifile(E-Journal Finder lists art journals, like Art in America,as available here)
      • JSTOR(exs: Artibus et Historiae, Museum Studies)
      • Humanities International Complete(exs: Art Asia Pacific, Word & Image)
    • Advantages of…
      Books
      Good for background information, timeline, definitions, etc.
      Length allows author to go more in-depth
      Articles
      More specialized searching
      Better for newer artists/designers (may not have books)
      More current information—more recently published
    • Search Strategies
      Keyword:
      • Simplest search
      • Looks for records that match the words typed, not the ideas represented by the words
      Controlled Vocabulary (Subjects):
      • Uses subject headings for more refined results
      • Looks for records that match the ideas represented by the words.
      • Terms are standardized
      • Often active links
      Keyword: Reginald Marsh VSSubject Heading: Marsh, Reginald
      Keyword: Great Depression VSSubject Heading: Depressions—1929
    • More Search Strategies:Boolean Searching
      AND/OR/NOT
      Combine keywords to narrow/broaden your search
      AND— NARROWS YOUR SEARCH
      EX: Tapestry AND Flemish
      Psychological AND Color
      OR—EXPANDS YOUR SEARCH
      EX: Film OR video OR
      Wall paintings OR murals
      NOT—LIMITS TERMS FROM SEARCH
      EX: Gothic NOT Revival
      Maya NOT Software NOT
      Psychological
      Color
      AND
      Wall paintings
      Murals
      Gothic
      Revival
    • Research Checklist
      Stateyourtopicasa question.
      Identify main concepts.
      Narrow or broaden your topic.
      Keep a list of terms that work best for your topic & add to it as you go.
      This works whether you’re writing a brief paper or an in-depth research paper.
    • Find an image &Want to find out more?
      Why Not Use the 'L'?
      by Reginald Marsh (1930)
    • Brainstorm: Search Terms
      • Reginald Marsh
      • “The Depression”
      Great Depression
      Depressions—1929
      • Race, Racial relations
      • Homeless, Homelessness
      • New York, New York City
      • Subway
      • Economic Conditions
      • Egg tempera
      *Try together or alone
    • Evaluate Your Sources
      Evaluate the sources you find!
      Print AND Online
      CRAAP Test:
      Currency—Is the information out-of-date?
      Relevance—Is the information on topic?
      Authority—Who wrote the information?
      Accuracy—Is the information correct?
      Purpose—What is the information intended to do? Educate? Persuade? Entertain?
    • Questions
      Stop by the Reference Desk
      Ask-a-Librarian: IM, Email, etc. (http://library.gmu.edu/ask)
      Call the reference desk at 703/993-2210
      OR your liaison 703/993-3720
      InfoGuides(http://infoguides.gmu.edu/)
      Visual Arts Liaison: Jenna Rinalducci