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Crayfish dissection diagrams
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Crayfish dissection diagrams

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  • 1. Dorsal View1. These are the crayfishs uropods. It has two pairs of these appendages.2. This is the crayfishs telson. It is used in combination with the uropods for backwards escape swimming.3. This is the crayfishs abdomen. Its paired appendages are the swimmerets and uropods.4. This is the crayfishs cephalothorax. It is covered with a carapace that offers some protection from predators.5. This is the cephalic groove, a lateral seam in the carapace between the head and thorax regions.6. These are two of 8 (4 pairs) of walking legs. Each walking leg has an attached gill that is found just beneath the exoskeleton.7.. This is the crayfishs left cheliped. These appendages are used for defense and food handling.8. This is the crayfishs left eye.9. This region of the carapace is called the rostrum.a This is the crayfishs left long antenna, a sensory organ.
  • 2. Mouth Area1. The crayfish has four pairs of walking legs.2. The arrows point to appendages off of several of the crayfishs 3 pairs of maxillipeds.3. The arrow points to the crayfishs right mandible. The mouth is in this area.4. The arrow points to a renal pore, an opening of the crayfishs excretory organ, the green gland.5. The arrow points to one of the long antennae.6. The arrow points to one of the short antennae (or antennules).7. This is the crayfishs right cheliped.
  • 3. Ventral View1. These are the crayfishs uropods. It has two pairs of these appendages.2. These are the crayfishs swimmerets. There are five pairs of these appendages.3. These are the crayfishs walking legs. There are four pairs of these appendages.4. This is the crayfishs right cheliped. These appendages are used for defense and food handling.5. This specimen is a male. Its first two pair of swimmerets are elongate and form a sperm transfer organ. In females, the first two pairs of swimmerets are unmodified.6. This is the crayfishs right long antenna, a sensory organ.
  • 4. Male1. This is a swimmeret, a short, filamentous appendage.2. The pin points to the male genetal opening. Sperm are released here and delivered by the males modified swimmerets to the females seminal receptacle.3. In the male, the first two pairs of swimmerets are longer, and prong-shaped. They serve as a sperm transfer organ during mating. In this photo, the right modified swimmeret has been pushed aside, while the left one is in place.4. This is the base of the fifth pair of walking legs.5. This is the base of the fourth pair of walking legs.6. This is the base of the third pair of walking legs.7. This is the base of the second pair of walking legs.8. This is the base of the first pair of walking legs, called the chelipeds.
  • 5. Female1. The arrows point to several swimmerets, short, filamentous appendages that are unmodified in the female.2. The arrow points to the seminal receptacle. Sperm received from the male are stored here until the female releases eggs.3. This is the base of the fifth pair of walking legs.4. This is the base of the fourth pair of walking legs.5. The female genital openings are located on the bases of the third pair of walking legs. The arrow points to an opening.6. This is the base of the second pair of walking legs.
  • 6. Cephalothorax (dorsal)1. The arrow points to a gill within the exposed branchial cavity. They are attached directly to the walking legs. This forces water over them when the crayfish moves.2. The arrow points to the crayfishs heart.3. The arrow points to a portion of the crayfishs hepatopancreas gland.4. The arrow points to the mandibular adductor muscle. It was attached to the inner surface of the carapace. Its contraction causes the mandibles to come together.5. The arrow points to the gastric stomach, the portion of the digestive system containing the gastric mill, a chitinous arrangement of teeth, files, and sieves used to grind up the food.6. The arrow points to the crayfishs right eye.
  • 7. Branchial Chamber1. The arrows show where the gills are attached to each of the five pairs of walking legs.2. The carapace covering the right branchial chamber has been removed showing the gills. Water is drawn into the posterior end of this chamber, flows across the gills, and leaves via the anterior end.3. This is the cephalic groove, a lateral seam in the carapace between the head and thorax regions.4. The arrow points to the right third maxillilped.5. This is the crayfishs right cheliped. These appendages are used for defense and food handling.6. This is the crayfishs right eye.7. This region of the carapace is called the rostrum.8. This is the crayfishs right long antenna, a sensory organ.
  • 8. •Cephalothorax (lateral)1. The arrows point to the cut bases of walking legs 3, 4, and 5.2. This is the right branchial chamber. The gill filaments have been trimmed to reveal deeper structures.3. The arrow points to the heart. Click within the yellow rectangle to see an isolated crayfish heart.4. The arrow points to a portion of the crayfishs hepatopancreas gland.5. The arrow points to the stomach. Click within the yellow rectangle to see a dissection of the gastric mill within the cardiac portion of the stomach.6. The arrow points to a green gland. These organs help the crayfish get rid of excess water and ammonia.
  • 9. Cephalothorax, deeper (dorsal)1. The arrow points to a portion of the crayfishs hepatopancreas gland.2. The arrow points to a green gland. These organs help the crayfish get rid of excess water and ammonia.3. The arrow points to the cut gut tube at the level of the esophagus. The stomach has been removed.4. The arrows point to the ventral nerve cord. The brain is anterior and not visible. The nerve cords leave the brain, go around the the esophagus, and become the ventral nerve cord, characteristic of the arthropods.
  • 10. Abdomen (dorsal)1. These are the crayfishs uropods. It has two pairs of these appendages.2. This is the crayfishs telson. It, in combination with the uropods, is used in rapid, backwards escape swimming.3. These are the crayfishs abdominal flexor muscles. They provide the major force for rapid backwards swimming by flexing the tail.4. These are the crayfishs intestine.5. The arrow points to the porterior portion of the crayfishs right branchial chamber.