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Making healthy choices
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  • 1. * A look inside the food pyramid Jessica Lykens
  • 2. P h T y H s E i c Oils a F l O A O c D t i v P i R t Y y A M I D Grains Vegetables Fruits Milk Meats
  • 3. • Physical activity is simple. It just means movement of the body that uses energy. Physical activity can be anything. Walking, gardening, dancing, climbing the stairs, playing soccer, or briskly pushing a baby stroller are all considered physical activity. • For health benefits, physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day.
  • 4. Moderate physical activities: Vigorous physical activities: •Walking briskly (about 3 ½ miles per •Running/jogging (5 miles per hour) hour) •Bicycling (more than 10 miles per •Hiking hour) •Gardening/yard work •Swimming (freestyle laps) •Dancing •Aerobics •Golf (walking and carrying clubs) •Walking very fast (4 ½ miles per •Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour) hour) •Heavy yard work, such as chopping •Weight training (general light wood workout) •Weight lifting (vigorous effort) •Basketball (competitive)
  • 5. * *Bicycling 5 miles per hour is considered vigorous physical activity. TRUE FALSE Back to my pyramid
  • 6. * *In order to be considered vigorous physical activity, bicycling must be performed at a rate of more than 10 miles per hour. Back to my pyramid
  • 7. * *In order to be considered vigorous physical activity, bicycling must be performed at a rate of more than 10 miles per hour. Back to my pyramid
  • 8. • Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product. • Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the Refined grains have been entire grain kernel -- the milled, a process that removes bran, germ, and the bran and germ. This is done endosperm. to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins
  • 9. Whole grains: Refined grains: •whole-wheat flour •white flour •bulgur (cracked wheat) •degermed cornmeal •oatmeal •white bread •whole cornmeal •white rice •brown rice •Cornbread •Buckwheat •corn tortillas •bulgur (cracked wheat) •Couscous •Oatmeal •Crackers •popcorn •flour tortillas •Grits •noodles
  • 10. * *White flour is an example of a whole grain. TRUE FALSE
  • 11. * *White flour is an example of a refined grain. *Whole wheat flour is an example of a whole grain. Back to my pyramid
  • 12. * *White flour is an example of a refined grain. *Whole wheat flour is an example of a whole grain. Back to my pyramid
  • 13. • Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the vegetable group. • Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.
  • 14. Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content. Some commonly eaten vegetables in each subgroup are: Dark green Orange Dry beans and Starchy vegetables: vegetables: peas: vegetables romaine lettuce carrots black beans corn spinach hubbard squash black-eyed peas green peas turnip greens pumpkin garbanzo beans lima beans (green) sweet potatoes kidney beans potatoes Other vegetables: artichokes asparagus cauliflower green beans onions
  • 15. * *Carrots are a great example of a starchy vegetable. TRUE FALSE
  • 16. * *Carrots are a great example of an orange vegetable, not a starch. Back to my pyramid
  • 17. * *Carrots are a great example of an orange vegetable, not a starch. Back to my pyramid
  • 18. • Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. • Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.
  • 19. Some Common Fruits: 100% Fruit Juices: •Apples •Cantaloupe •Apricots •Honeydew • Orange •Avocado •watermelon • Apple •Bananas •Nectarines • Grape •Strawberries •Oranges • Grapefruit •Blueberries •Peaches •Raspberries •Pears •Cherries •Papaya •Grapefruit •Pineapple •Grapes •Plums •Kiwi fruit •Prunes •Lemons •Raisins •Limes •Tangerines •Mangoes
  • 20. * *100% Fruit Juice counts as part of the fruit group TRUE FALSE
  • 21. * *100% Fruit Juice does count as part of the fruit group. Back to my pyramid
  • 22. * *100% Fruit Juice does count as part of the fruit group. Back to my pyramid
  • 23. • All fluid milk products are part of this food group. Many foods made from milk are also part of this group. • Foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are part of this group. • Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium (cream cheese, cream, butter) are not. • It’s important to remember that milk group choices should be low-fat or fat-free.
  • 24. Some commonly eaten choices in the milk, yogurt, and cheese group are: Cheese* Yogurt* Milk* cheddar All yogurt All fluid milk: mozzarella Fat-free fat-free (skim) Swiss low fat low fat (1%) parmesan reduced fat reduced fat (2%) ricotta whole milk yogurt whole milk cottage cheese lactose free milks *Choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese.
  • 25. * *It is not necessary for most milk group choices to be fat-free or low-fat. TRUE FALSE
  • 26. * *Most milk group choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Back to my pyramid
  • 27. * *Most milk group choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Back to my pyramid
  • 28. • All foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. • Dry beans and peas are part of this group as well as the vegetable group • Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat. • Fish, nuts, and seeds contain healthy oils, so choose these foods frequently instead of meat or poultry.
  • 29. Some commonly eaten meats in the food group: Meat: Poultry: Fish: Dry beans and peas: Nuts & seeds: beef chicken herring black beans almonds ham duck mackerel black-eyed peas cashews lamb goose pollock chickpeas (garbanzo hazelnuts pork turkey porgy beans) (filberts) veal salmon falafel mixed nuts sea bass kidney beans Find a complete list of meats here
  • 30. * *Not all foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. TRUE FALSE
  • 31. * *All foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. Back to my pyramid
  • 32. * *All foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. Back to my pyramid
  • 33. * • Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature. • Many vegetable oils are used in cooking. • Oils come from many different plants and from fish.
  • 34. * Some common oils are: • canola oil • corn oil • cottonseed oil • olive oil • safflower oil • soybean oil • sunflower oil
  • 35. * *Some oils come from fish. TRUE FALSE
  • 36. * *Some oils do come from different types of fish. Back to my pyramid
  • 37. * *Some oils do come from different types of fish. Back to my pyramid
  • 38. * * I was unaware until starting this project that 100% fruit & vegetable juices were considered a part of their respective categories. * I also was not aware that pushing a stroller (something I do quite often) is considered a physical activity. * I did not know that beans and peas are part of both the vegetable and meat groups. I believe that as an educator and with the problems our nation is facing with childhood obesity that we should be as educated as possible on nutrition so that we can battle obesity. I think showing children what choices are healthy for them and giving them examples and a site to reference is a great idea. Back to my pyramid
  • 39. * * Agriculture, U. D. (2010, August 26). My Pyramid. Retrieved August 30, 2010, from My Pyramid: http://www.mypyramid.gov/ * Janice Thompson, M. M. (2009). MyPyramid: The Food Guide Pyramid. In M. M. Janice Thompson, Nutrition: An Applied Approach (pp. 51-58). San Francisco: Pearson Education, Inc. Back to my pyramid