Class presentation 2010

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presentation of dissertation for Research 1 TNU

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Class presentation 2010

  1. 1. Joyce A. Lighari<br />
  2. 2. Blessed be the tie that binds?<br />
  3. 3. What is the purpose of the dissertation?<br />The purpose of this study is to determine if computer mediated social networking (FACEBOOK) has an impact on adult Christian community through an analysis of traditional, hybrid and virtual adult Christian learning communities.<br />
  4. 4. What is the guiding question?<br />What impact does the use of a computer mediated social networking hybrid adult Christian learning community have on adult Christian community? <br />
  5. 5. What is the rational for this project?<br />Adult Christian development continues throughout the lifespan (Fowler 2000)<br />Christian community is a fundamental aspect of Christianity (Hanson, 1994; Hellerman, 2001) <br />Adults learn in community (Palmer, 2007, 1980; Mezirow, 2000)<br />Culture is shifting from the information age to the inventive age (Pagitt, 2010)<br />
  6. 6. Rational continued….<br />Computer mediated social networking is a tool of the inventive age (Baab, 2008, 2010; Forbes, 2008)<br />Computer mediated social networking enhances community (Ellison, Steinfield & Lampe, 2007; Harrison & Thomas, 2009; Kavanaugh, Carroll, Rosson, Zin, & Reese, 2005; Smith & Kollock, 1999)<br /> Computer mediated social networking is a tool to enhance Christian community (Rice, 2009; Hargraves, 2010a & b)<br />
  7. 7. First Hypothesis <br />The use of a computer-mediated social network hybrid adult Christian learning community has a positive impact on adult Christian community when compared to historical methods of adult Christian community.<br />
  8. 8. Second Hypothesis <br />There will be an increase in the number of contacts and the frequency of contacts made between individuals when a hybrid computer-mediated social network adult Christian learning community and a virtual computer-mediated social network adult Christian community are compared to a traditional adult Christian learning community.<br />
  9. 9. Third Hypothesis <br />There will be a difference in the perception of the quality of community by participants involved in a hybrid computer-mediated social network adult Christian learning community and a virtual computer-mediated social network when compared to a traditional adult Christian learning community. <br />
  10. 10. Fourth Hypothesis <br />There will be a difference in personal spiritual growth by participants involved in a hybrid computer-mediated social network adult Christian learning community and a virtual computer-mediated social network Christian community when compared to individuals in a traditional adult Christian learning community.<br />
  11. 11. We expect a theophany of which we know nothing but the place, and the place is called community. <br />Martin Buber<br />
  12. 12. References<br />Baab, L. M. (2010). The future church: Identity and persuasion on congregational websites (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of Washington. doi: AAT 3265293 <br />Baab, L. M. (2008). Reaching out in a networked world: expressing your congregation's heart and soul. Herndon, VA: Alban Institute. <br />Forbes, C. (2008). Facebook for pastors. Retrieved July 26, 2010, from ministrymarketingcoach.com <br />Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer mediated Communications. Retrieved July 21, 2010, from http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ <br />Fowler, J. W. (2000). Becoming adult, becoming Christian: adult development and Christian faith. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. <br />Hanson, P. D. (1986). The people called: the growth of community in the Bible. San Francisco, CA: Harper & Row.<br />
  13. 13. References<br />Harrison, R., & Thomas, M. (2009). Identity in online communities: social networking sites and language learning. International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, 7(2), 109-124. doi: Document ID: 1929531661<br />Hargraves, J. S. (2010a). Tools for communicating: What has the church done? In Telling the story: the Gospel in a technological age (pp. 43-64). Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys Pub. <br />Hargraves, J. S. (2010b). Tools for communicating: Where can the church go? In Telling the story: the Gospel in a technological age (pp. 65-99). Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys Pub. <br />Hellerman, J. H. (2001). The ancient church as family. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.<br />Kavanaugh, A., Carroll, J. M., Rosson, M., Zin, T., & Reese, D. D. (2005). Community networks: Where offline communities meet online. Journal of Computer mediated Communication, 10(4), 3rd ser. Retrieved July 21, 2010, from http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol10/issue4/kavanaugh.html<br />
  14. 14. References<br />Mezirow, J. (2000). Learning to think like an adult. In Learning as transformation: critical perspectives on a theory in progress (pp. 3-33). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.<br />Pagitt, D. (2010). Church in the inventive age. Minneapolis, MN: Sparkhouse Press.<br />Palmer, P. J. (2007). The courage to teach: exploring the inner landscape of a teacher's life. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. <br />Palmer, P. J. (1980). A place called community. In The promise of paradox: a celebration of contradictions in the Christian life (pp. 67-91). Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press. <br />Smith, M. A., & Kollock, P. (1999). Chapter 1: Communities in cyberspace. In Communities in cyberspace (pp. 3-25). London: Routledge. <br />
  15. 15. Thank you<br />Are there any questions?<br />

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