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Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Training 5.4.10 Strategic Communications for Nonprofits
 

Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Training 5.4.10 Strategic Communications for Nonprofits

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Need basic training in nonprofit communications? This workshop will help you assess your organization's communications work, and give you the tools to communicate more effectively with members, ...

Need basic training in nonprofit communications? This workshop will help you assess your organization's communications work, and give you the tools to communicate more effectively with members, donors, and other constituents, even with a small marketing and communications budget. Content will include communications planning, crafting messages, targeting audiences, and choosing tools and technology to get your message across.

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  • If group is small enough (25 or less) you can go around the room and have each person respond to the 3 points If group is larger than 25, everyone to quickly go around and say their name and organization then divide folks into pairs, have them share with each other their hopes and expectations. then bring everyone back and popcorn the hopes/expectations Do the “Communication is key” exercise Key point: we are all communicators and communications is crucial in all the work we do
  • Review the companion agenda with the goals on this slide
  • Group activity–popcorn the ideas, write ideas up on the flipchart
  • Ask participants: given all the reasons that we just said that PR is crucial, then why don’t we devote more of our time, money and resources to it? Popcorn the ideas–write up on the flipchart
  • Points to make: • we have ignored the arena of communications at our own peril • communications is an arena that we have not adequately tackled in our movement • we have focused on the important arenas of services, legislation and policy and now we have to tackle this arena
  • Point: the dv movement has often overlooked the importance of communications to all the other arenas of work we need to do to serve victims
  • In order to meet your mission, you need to be strategic about you communication Chart shows interpersonal communication (calls, fliers, email) and mass communication (bus, billboard, tv/radio ads)
  • Number 1 rule: when the media calls, DON”T just start talking, ever!
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • Energy in/energy out exercise Key point of that exercise: energy in equals energy out. You can ユ t expect to be happy with how the media covers the issue of domestic violence if your organization does not devote any time, money or resources to the communications arena. Assessment: not to make you feel bad about what you aren’t doing Rather, see it as a blueprint of what you need to work on Communications is hard work!!!
  • These are the core building blocks in building PR as an arena
  • How many of you have a communication plan? How many have a yearly media plan?
  • Use and record an example from the audience of a program goal
  • For both short term or long term planning you need to identify: Goals Audiences Messages Tactics to reach your audience Evaluation
  • Key point: we have to deal with the reality that when you leave this training you are not going back to an organization that all a sudden has money and staff time to devote to communications. Given that reality, brainstorm on what you can do, given the reality of your organization What can you do different? What can you do to shift resources? How can you free up some time?? Write ideas up on flipchart–feedback from group
  • Now we are going to learn how to write a communication plan PR firms charge between $5,000 - $10,000 to write communications plan. Save your money!! You are going to learn how to do it yourself.
  • The first step is to determine the process Who is going to be responsible for the overall process and product? Divide group into groups of 4-5 to respond to the question of “what is your first step upon returning to your organization to begin this process?”
  • Goals are usually spelled out in your organization’s strategic plan If you don’t have a strategic plan, ask “what do we want to achieve?” Using the worksheet, each participant to list some of the goals of their organization (participants should work with others from their organization) Pick one of your goals Share with your group–each group to share with the larger group
  • Audiences are not just outside your organization. Remember your staff, your Board and other internal audiences Participants to pull out audience worksheet and brainstorm on all the audiences they need to reach out to in order to meet the goal they have identified
  • For example, teen campaign. When RICADV wanted to do a campaign aimed to teens they did focus groups. Found out that teens don’t relate to the term “domestic violence,” so instead they used the slogan “dating violence.” Good thing they tested the message–otherwise they would have created materials with a message that didn’t work for the audience they were targeting!!
  • Direct tactics such as phone calls, fliers, emails, etc. Mass media such as billboard ads, bus ads, tv or radio ads
  • Prioritize tactics, be realistic (time & resources), select tactics that someone in the organization has the time to do
  • Ask the group to brainstorm on other tactics for reaching rural victims
  • There are many ways to evaluate–from the more formal (evaluators) to informal methods (focus groups, surveys)
  • Ask the group to brainstorm on other tactics for reaching rural victims
  • A key to developing a communication plan that is a working, living document is to involve those staff members that are doing the program work. This is their communication plan, therefore the PR staff member can not develop this plan in a vacuum. Also, have to develop a way to make the plan be reviewed, worked on–there must be accountability to the tasks chosen
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • These are the key principles to your communications work
  • Media caucus helps us get our ideas across. Helps to control the interview. Keeps our message clear. Opens up a relationship with the journalists.
  • Number 1 rule: when the media calls, DON”T just start talking, ever!
  • Ask the group these questions, allow participants to answer and discuss their experience with using a Request for Coverage/Media Advisory
  • Examples of creative advisories: We sent lifesavers for our Donate-a-Phone press conference announcing the number of phones we had collected. The advisory stated, “Thanks for being a lifesaver,” and we attached a packet of lifesavers. For our Mother’s Day rally advisory we attached a heart shaped cookie that said, “I love my mom.” For the groundbreaking of one of our member agencies new building we sent a construction lego man with the name of the agency on his chest.
  • Pull out the sample Request for Coverage/Media Advisory - What do you notice about it?
  • The Request for Coverage/Media Advisory goes to the Assignment Editor or News Director Timing: about 2 to 3 days prior to the event. For a weekly newspaper you can send a week ahead of time Group to brainstorm on how they would use the Request for Coverage/Media Advisory Call backs are CRUCIAL!!
  • Ask the group these questions, allow participants to answer and discuss their experience with using a press release
  • The press release is your chance to tell the story from your organization’s perspective
  • Pull out the sample press release What do you notice about it? How does it differ from an advisory or PSA? Questions?
  • The Press Release goes to the Assignment Editor or News Director Timing: Given at the event, press conference, lobby day, rally, etc. Sent to those media outlets that don’t attend the press event Group to brainstorm on how they would use the Press Release Follow up with the reporters is crucial. You want to talk with them about the press release to reiterate your points, make sure they understand the story, find out if they need to talk with any of your sources quoted, etc.
  • Ask the group these questions, allow participants to answer and discuss their experience with using a Letter to the Editor
  • It is exactly what it is called, a letter to the editor of a newspaper
  • Pull out the sample Letter to the Editor What do you notice about it? Questions?
  • The Letter to the Editor goes to the Editorial Board or Letter to the Editor Department The newspaper will list its requirements in the paper in the Letter to Editor section Timing: ASAP, Letters to the Editors need to be a quick response to a story or event reported in the news Group to brainstorm on how they will use the Letter to the Editor Follow up with the reporters is crucial. You want to talk with them about the press statement to reiterate your points, make sure they understand the story, find out if they need to talk with your spokesperson
  • Ask the group these questions, allow participants to answer and discuss their experience with using an Op-Ed
  • It is worth checking in with the paper to see if they will accept your Op-Ed before you can to all the trouble of writing one
  • The Op-Ed goes to the Editorial Board The newspaper will list its requirements in the paper or you can call the Editorial Board staff to ask for the requirements Timing: Op-Eds should be written in a timely manner to correspond with a news event or news story that your organization wants to comment on Group to brainstorm on how they will use the Op-Ed Follow up with the reporters is crucial. You want to talk with them about the press statement to reiterate your points, make sure they understand the story, find out if they need to talk with your spokesperson
  • The Op-Ed goes to the Editorial Board The newspaper will list its requirements in the paper or you can call the Editorial Board staff to ask for the requirements Timing: Op-Eds should be written in a timely manner to correspond with a news event or news story that your organization wants to comment on Group to brainstorm on how they will use the Op-Ed Follow up with the reporters is crucial. You want to talk with them about the press statement to reiterate your points, make sure they understand the story, find out if they need to talk with your spokesperson
  • The Op-Ed goes to the Editorial Board The newspaper will list its requirements in the paper or you can call the Editorial Board staff to ask for the requirements Timing: Op-Eds should be written in a timely manner to correspond with a news event or news story that your organization wants to comment on Group to brainstorm on how they will use the Op-Ed Follow up with the reporters is crucial. You want to talk with them about the press statement to reiterate your points, make sure they understand the story, find out if they need to talk with your spokesperson
  • Key points to remember
  • Let’s talk about each of these pieces Let’s start with what makes a story newsworthy - ask the group to brainstorm on what makes a story newsworthy - popcorn the answers
  • Need source for quote from Jackie
  • Review what makes a story newsworthy
  • Exercise: DVAM campaign, a murder, a feature story. Give pairs one of each of these – and figure out how to make it newsworthy
  • Using the worksheet, each participant to brainstorm on possible messages to their desired audience Share with your group–each group to share with the larger group
  • Using the worksheet, each participant to brainstorm on possible messages to their desired audience Share with your group–each group to share with the larger group
  • Ask participants to pull out the “Rats Bite” exercise–have three different participants each read one of the stories After they have all been read ask for each story, who is to blame? How might the issue be resolved?
  • Show the video clip from RICADV’s Homicide Bill press conference or from another case example
  • Key points to remember
  • Review the steps to a successful pitch
  • Review the steps to a successful pitch
  • It is quite simply a tool we use to prepare ourselves–our message and our spokespeople
  • If you don’t say it they won’t print it!
  • A media caucus is used in both proactive media work and reactive media work
  • What is the angle of the reporter? Start framing your message on the phone. Find out what their deadline is. Let them know your spokesperson will get back to them ASAP Who else have you spoken with?-tells you how the story may be shaped
  • Give an example of when you have done this and how it helped with the framing of the story Rhode Island example–Kimberly Gavin
  • Provide a caucus example, explain how and why it worked
  • Can’t emphasize this enough–practice is the key to getting good at answering the questions from the reporter
  • What is the key point you want to make? Instruct groups, slide by slide. After the groups have worked for 15 minutes, give them a 10 minute warning After 5 more minutes, give them a 5 minute warning Then do the practice interviews in front of the whole group
  • Evaluation - Learn the reporter’s style, bias, interpretation of your message.
  • Learn the reporter’s style of asking questions… how do they interpret what you say. Get to know the various reporters and their “style”
  • Learn the reporter’s style of asking questions… how do they interpret what you say. Get to know the various reporters and their “style”
  • Group activity–popcorn the ideas, write ideas up on the flipchart
  • Ask participants: given all the reasons that we just said that PR is crucial, then why don’t we devote more of our time, money and resources to it? Popcorn the ideas–write up on the flipchart
  • Point: the dv movement has often overlooked the importance of communications to all the other arenas of work we need to do to serve victims
  • Point: the dv movement has often overlooked the importance of communications to all the other arenas of work we need to do to serve victims
  • Point: the dv movement has often overlooked the importance of communications to all the other arenas of work we need to do to serve victims
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • Number 1 rule: when the media calls, DON”T just start talking, ever!
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications
  • These are the important points in building a strategic approach to communications within your organization Key point: this takes time. 7 year rule–it takes 5-7 years to institutionalize within an organization the ability to employ a strategic approach to communications

Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Training 5.4.10 Strategic Communications for Nonprofits Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Training 5.4.10 Strategic Communications for Nonprofits Presentation Transcript

  • Jennifer Leigh Nonprofit Communications Director and Consultant Providence, RI [email_address] 401-595-9885 Strategic Communications 101
  • Introductions
    • Welcome!
    • Share with the group:
      • Name
      • Organization
      • Your hopes/expectations
    • Review the Agenda
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Goals for this session
    • Overview of strategic communications
    • Assess your organization’s current communications work
    • Review the components of developing a communications plan
    • Understand how to brand your organization
    • Discuss media systems and databases
    • Distinguish between various media tools
    • Learn how to frame and pitch your media message
    • Overview of social media
  • Planning your work and working your plan
  • Why care about Communications?
    • Brainstorm on the reasons we need to devote time, money and resources to communications/public relations
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Why care about Communications?
    • Brainstorm on the reasons we don’t devote time, money and resources to communications/public relations
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Why care about Communications?
    • We can’t not care!
    • Communicating your organization/mission
      • Fundraising
      • Collateral
    • Communicating your message/services
    • Last frontier–we need to stop seeing it as a negative arena
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Communications is key
    • Key to all the areas we work on
    • In order to achieve the goals we set for policy, systems work, work with constituents, etc. we must communicate
    • Basically communications is the over arching structure that includes media, public awareness, public relations, etc.
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Communications is more than just media
    • We communicate...
      • to our board members when we have a board meeting
      • to our donors when we send out an annual appeal
      • to our legislators when we lobby
      • to our colleagues when we speak at a conference
      • to the community when we hold a rally
    9
  • 9 Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan Communications is “how” you relate to your audiences
    • Organizational Goals
    • To influence legislation
    • To get residents to join Making Connections
    • To encourage people to reach out to their legislators
    • Your
    • Audiences:
    • Community groups
    • Legislators
    • City officials
    • Media
    • Each other
    • Tactics/ tools :
    • Calls
    • Fliers
    • Email
    • Letters
    • Brochures
    • Media
    • Message
    • “ Adult Education helps ensure people get the skills they need to work”
    • “ The mission of Making Connections is…”
    • “ You can influence the state budget”
  • Communicating Strategically
    • Whether it is short-term or long-term planning, it’s crucial to figure out:
      • What are our goals
      • Who is our audience
      • What is our message
      • What are our tactics
    14 Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • A Strategic Approach to Communications
    • Is about strategic communications, not just media
    • Starts with a communication plan and builds key core competencies over time–start small, build big
    • Links communications to organizing, policy and other arenas of the organization
    • Institutionalizes communications within the organization
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Your Organization’s Communications work
    • Everyone to take 10 minutes to fill out communication assessment
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Strategic building blocks
    • Communication Plan
    • Branding your Organization
    • Media Systems & Database
    • Media Tools and Outreach
    • Message Development
    • Social Media & Networking
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Writing a Communications Plan
  • How do you currently plan your communications?
    • A. Strategically (you say “What are we trying to achieve here?”)
    • B. Tactically (you say “Let’s have a rally!”)
    • C. Proactively (you say “I know this legislation is coming out, let’s plan our message”)
    • D. Reactively (you say “The legislation came out, now what?!”)
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan 20
  • Communications Plan
    • A communications plan is the foundation to all your public relations work
    • It helps you be more strategic about your public relations work
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • What’s the difference?
    • Strategic Plan
    • Helps organization get clear about its program goals
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
    • Communications Plan
    • Helps your organization get clear about its audiences, tactics to reach those audiences, and the messages to those audiences in order to meet your program goals
  • Communication Planning
    • Short-term Planning
    • Focused on communication to accomplish a specific objective–getting people to attend your event, convincing elected officials to support your legislation, etc.
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
    • Long term Planning
    • Tied to your strategic plan
    • Looks at more than just media
  • Communications Plan
    • Does your agency have a communications plan, does not have a communications plan, or has somewhat of a communications plan?
  • Writing A Communication Plan
    • Establish goals for your organization or program. Use your agency’s strategic plan if available, as goals are identified.
    • For each goal, consider:
      • Audiences
      • Messages to your audiences
      • Tactics/tool for reaching your audiences
      • Evaluation
  • Foundation: Process
    • Your organization needs to determine the process for developing your communication plan
      • Who needs to be at the table?
      • Process for including staff, ED and Board
      • Timeline/workplans
      • Who is doing what?
      • Accountability for plan
  • First step: Goals
    • “ What” your organization or program wants to achieve
    • Example: Engage in strategic communications with the dual purpose of (1) improving the visibility and positive perception of the Institute with its key publics while (2) changing public attitudes toward low and modest-income Rhode Islander by raising awareness about the causes of, and possible solutions to ending, poverty.
  • Second step: Audiences
    • The “Who”
    • Think about who you need to communicate with to meet your goal
    • Example: Businesses and Chambers of Commerce
  • Third step: Messages
    • The “what you want to tell” your audience
    • Consider what you want to tell your audience in order to achieve your goal
    • Consider “what action you want your audience to take”
    • Test your message!
  • Messages Example
    • The Poverty Institute and businesses have the same goals: a stable fiscal environment, a strong, vibrant economy and healthy communities. (though we may have different methods of achieving these goals)
    • We are not anti-business
    • We want people to work, too, i.e. workforce development plans, child support, etc. (we do not promote a welfare state)
    • The issues that we fight for ultimately help your employees and you (more highly skilled workforce, child support for your workers, etc.)
  • Fourth step: Tactics
    • The “tools” you use to get your message to your desired audience
    • Tactics can be direct
    • Tactics can be mass media
  • Tactics
    • Direct
    • Phone calls
    • Fliers
    • Emails
    • Brochures
    • Mass Media
      • Billboard Ads
      • Bus Ads
      • TV
      • Radio Ads
    Only list the tactics you have the resources to do!
  • Tactics examples
      • 1-1 meetings with key players, introducing/reintroducing them to the Poverty Institute and explaining what we do
      • Explore the feasibility of an advisory committee
      • Pitch presentation opportunities to the Chambers of Commerce
      • Reach out to professional organizations as a gateway/middle man to employers
      • Coordinate a debate on tax and budget issues, brining in RIPEC and other diverse voices
  • Fifth step: Evaluation
    • The “how you know if you have been successful in reaching your desired audience” with your desired message
    • Measure of effectiveness of tactic and message
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Evaluation example
    • Increased number of presentations at Chamber of Commerce
    • Increased submissions into Providence Business News
    • Increased meetings with key business leaders
    • Joint submission of legislation with key business leaders
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Important to Remember!
    • Do this for each of your strategic goals, put it all together and you have a communications plan
    • Assign staff to the various tactics–if there isn’t a person to do it, take it out of the plan!
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Communications really works!
    • Rhode Island’s cash assistance program
      • Major changes to the program in 2008
      • New program called RI Works
        • Enacted stricter time limits (some of the most stringent in the country)
        • Enacted a “work first” approach
    • As a result of the new time limits, thousands of families would “time off” of the program in June 2009
    • In addition, with RI having the 2 nd highest unemployment rate at the time, the “work first” approach was not working
  • Communications really works!
    • The goals:
      • To pass legislation that would postpone the time limits for 12 months
      • To educate providers on what the new changes meant, and how they could help families
        • Alert families that they are about to “time off”
        • Help families apply for “hardship” extensions
    • The audiences
      • Legislators
      • Providers
      • Media
  • Communications really works!
    • The messages
      • More than 3,000 very poor families – including 6,000 children – will lose their cash assistance benefits through the RI Works Program.
      • Families rely on the cash assistance ($554/month for a family of 3) to pay rent and put food on the table.
      • When the new law was passed, the state’s economy was not in the terrible shape it is today. With the unemployment rate over 10%, these parents (over half of whom lack a high school education) are not able to find a job.
      • There is a solution: postpone the time limits, using federal funds to help pay for the benefits
  • Communications really works!
    • The communications strategy:
      • Legislative postcard campaign
        • From community members
        • From The Poverty Institute
      • Memos and trainings for providers on the changes
      • Flyers for providers to pass along to recipients
      • 1-1 meetings with key legislative leaders
      • Letters of support from key community leaders
      • Fact sheets
  • Communications really works!
    • The communications strategy:
      • Media campaign
        • Held a press conference in conjunction with the RI Interfaith Coalition
        • Had a panel of speakers (including providers, religious leaders, and members from The Poverty Institute) speak to the media on the dangers of having 3,000 families lose their cash assistance in June
        • Prepared a press kit full of information for the media, including compelling statistics and fact sheets
        • Had interesting visuals, including graphs and pictures
  • Communications really works!
    • The results: Time limits were postponed for 12 months!
      • Well-planned, integrated communications strategy across a variety of mediums and to an array of audiences was a key to this success
  • In Summary:
    • Start small, build big
    • Communications is more than just getting in the news
    • Devote organizational time, energy and resources to communications/public relations
    • All staff members are communicators, not just the Executive Director or PR person
    • Be strategic about all communications:
      • Goal--Audience--Message--Tactic
  • Branding Your Organization
  • Branding
    • Beyond just a logo…the look, feel and “essence” of an organization conveyed to its audiences
    • Importance of branding
      • recognition
      • credibility (donors, legislators, etc.)
      • identity
      • mission
  • Branding
  • Branding
    • Beyond just logos…each of those recognizable logos gives you instant images of the identity of that company…aka the brand
    • We may not have millions but can still give our orgs a “look and feel”
  • Branding
    • Some important materials to make sure you have on hand for promoting your organization
      • case statement
      • annual report
      • fact sheet about org
      • staff/board listing
      • palm card
      • “ About Us” page
      • E-news template
      • Power point template
  • Branding
    • Important branding techniques
      • logo on EVERYTHING
      • font
      • colors
      • photos/picture strips
    • Create a style guide/sheet for your organization
  • Branding
    • Other ways to brand your organization
      • phone message
      • e-signatures
      • building signage
      • ads
  • Branding REPORT COVERS
  • Tools to work with the Media
  • Working with the Media
    • Recognizing the needs of the press
    • Develop good systems
    • Understand which tools to use, and when
    • Develop your message with the right frame
    • Media Caucus
    • Prepare your spokesperson
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • The importance of media
    • One of our biggest tools in reaching our key audiences
    • The keeper of the illusive “general public”
    • One of our best allies, even if they are scary
    Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Understanding the media
    • First and foremost, before we reach out to the media, we need to monitor and understand it/them, and have systems in place to keep track of media-related information
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Press Database
    • Monitoring the Media
    • Media Forms
    • Media Coverage
    • Media Protocol
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Building your database
      • Who has an up-to-date press list?
      • Is it all inclusive? (radio, TV, press, blogs...)
      • Is it updated regularly?
      • Excel based? Online database?
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Main components of a good press list
      • Appropriate contact (editor at paper, news director at TV station...more on that later)
      • Updated contact info...including home cell/email, and preferred method of contact
      • When their deadline is
      • What topics they cover
      • Log of your interaction with them
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Resources to build your press list
      • other orgs
      • state databases
      • websites of the outlets
      • board and staff
      • paid databases
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Monitoring the media
      • Google Alerts
      • Online versions of radio, tv, print
      • Monitoring services
      • Goal is to 1) see what reporters are writing about 2) how they are framing the stories 3) when you have a chance to comment/educate the reporter
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Media Forms
      • Caucus Sheet
      • Call Log
      • Message Square/Triangle
      • Media Hit Sheet
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Media Coverage
      • Running tally of all media coverage
      • Media clipping binder
      • Online “newsroom” for media and others to view past media hits
    67
  • Building media systems
    • Media Protocol
      • Protocol for handling media calls
        • Return all calls promptly
        • Who responds? Who does the call get directed to?
      • Approval process for media pieces
    67
  • Understanding the media
    • Building relationships with reporters
      • Feed their egos!
      • Be mindful of their deadline and how they like to receive information
      • Don’t just reach out to them when you need something...give them kudos, send them helpful information, thank them
      • Be available: have all of your contact info (including cell) on website, media releases, etc.
      • Goal: become their go-to resource...they need you as much as you need them!
    67
  • How do we reach the media?
    • Not every event calls for a press conference!
    • Many more useful tools to reach media
    • Changing landscape in the media world, not as many staff on hand
    • Need to tailor your message to their needs
    67
  • Diversify your tool box
    • Certain media call for certain tools
    • With the advent of new media (websites, blogs, online press) there’s more options
    • Media receive hundreds of emails a day, important to target them correctly
    69
  • Request for Coverage/Advisory
    • Has anyone written a Request for Coverage/ Media Advisory?
    • What is it?
    • How have you used the Request for Coverage/Media Advisory?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • What is it?
    • Audience is the media to attend your event, press conference, lobby day, etc.
    • Follow up calls are crucial to pitch and secure media attendance at your event
    • Try and make your advisory stand out from the rest
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • The Format
    • Short, one page and needs to include:
      • Who?
      • What?
      • Where?
      • When?
      • Why?
    • Contact information including a number for after hours and weekends
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • How is it used?
    • Who does it go to at media outlet?
    • What is the timeline for the Request for Coverage?
    • How would you use it?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Press Release
    • Has anyone written a press release?
    • What is it?
    • How have you used the press release?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Press Release - What is it?
    • AKA News Release
    • Written for general public with media as the conduit for the information
      • Smaller outlets run release verbatim; Larger outlets
      • usually include key information or call for an interview
    • Your chance to tell the story
    • To announce breaking news, results, events, new programs/initiatives
    • Follow up calls crucial to make sure they received it and to see if they need more info
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Press Release – The Format
    • Facts of the story, results, what happened/is happening, pertinent event information, etc.
    • Quotes from compelling sources
    • Facts and statistics
    • Contact information
    • Photos if appropriate
    • Longer – 2 to 3 pages
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Press Release – How it is used?
    • Who does it go to at media outlet?
    • What is the timeline for the press release? When is it sent?
    • How would you use a press release or news release?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Letter to Editor
    • Has anyone written a Letter to the Editor?
    • What is it?
    • How have you used the Letter to Editor?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Letter to Editor – what is it?
    • On the editorial page of the newspaper
    • Audience is the reader
    • Your organization’s opportunity to give their viewpoint about something that has been recently published in that outlet
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Letter to the Editor - The Format
    • Newspaper has requirements on length, how to sent it to them, etc.
    • Can not be submitted anonymously
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • How is it used?
    • Who does it go to at media outlet?
    • When do you send a Letter to the Editor?
    • How will you use the Letter to the Editor?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Op-Ed
    • Has anyone written an Op-Ed?
    • What is it?
    • How have you used the Op-Ed?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Op-Ed – What is it?
    • On the opposite page from the editorial page of the newspaper
    • Audience is the reader
    • Your organization’s opinion not the newspaper’s opinion
    • Check in with the editor to see if they will accept your Op-Ed piece
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Op-Ed – How is it used?
    • Who does it go to at media outlet?
    • When do you send an Op-Ed?
    • How will you use the Op-Ed?
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • WHAT TOOL WOULD YOU USE?
    • Your organization is responding to recent even that happened in the community
    • Your organization is introducing a new legislative initiative
    • Your organization is having a 25 th anniversary gala
    • Your organization just received a grant
    • Your organization partnered with the post office to collect cell phones for low-income folks
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Other tools to use
    • Media Statement
    • Editorial
    • Calendar listing
    • PSA
    • Press conference
    • Press Kit
    • Backgrounder
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • In Summary...
    • Important to understand the needs of the media in order to determine which tool you should use
    • Important to understand how the media outlet works in order to make sure you are sending your tool to the correct person
    • Tools are just that, tools! They are not a substitute for developing relationships with journalists!!
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Developing Your Message
  • Getting your message across
    • Components needed in making the call to journalists
      • Newsworthiness –stories to tell
      • Pitching –how and who to tell
      • Timeliness –when to tell the story
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
    • “ The story that offers the most information with the most urgency , to the most people is the most newsworthy.”
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan What makes a story newsworthy?
  • What makes a story newsworthy?
    • Varies depending on:
      • Market
      • Media Outlet
      • What else is happening
      • Outlet’s audience
      • Subject of your story
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • What makes a story newsworthy?
    • Conflict
    • Change
    • Timeliness
    • Impact
    • Prominence
    • Proximity
    • The Unusual
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • What makes a story newsworthy?
    • What makes the following headlines “newsworthy?”
      • “ Former city official charged in racketeering”
      • “ Governor signs new legislation that takes handguns out of abusers”
      • “ Recent election brings out record number of voters”
      • “ 2 Rivals’ fiscal plans come to head at town meeting”
      • “ Penguins ends up escaping from local zoo, saved by teenager”
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Developing the Message
    • The “what you want to tell” your audience in order to achieve your goals
    • When developing your message, you need to keep in mind:
      • What your audience already knows
      • What you want them to know
      • What you want them to do
    PR Campaign © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Developing the Message
    • Three key things to understand about developing a message
      • Framing
      • Values
      • Message Caucus
  • Framing
    • We’re inundated with thousands of messages a day
    • People use mental shortcuts to make sense of the world
    • Incoming information provides cues about where to “file” it mentally
    • People get many of their frames from the media
    c/o Frameworks Institute
  • Framing
    • Individual vs. System Frames
      • The individual frame presents a portrait, while the system frame pulls the camera back to present a landscape
      • Too often our frames focus on the individual rather than the systemic issue
  • Framing INDIVIDUAL SYSTEM
  • Framing
    • “ Betty Jones and her family of four are braving the elements tonight because the homeless shelter was full.” vs.
    • “ The homeless shelter at 4th and Q was full again tonight because of drastic reductions in city allocations, and this situation is taking its toll on families like Betty Jones’.”
  • “ Rat Bite” Story
    • Same story, three different frames
    • Frame leads to how issue is defined, which leads to how issue might be resolved
    • It is all in the framing . . . that is where the media caucus comes in
  • Framing our message
    • What was the message?
    • Who were the messengers?
    • What visuals got the message out?
  • Values-based messages
    • Values: core beliefs that underlie all attitudes and behavior
    • Attitudes and behavior may change, but values endure across a person’s life span
  • Values
    • Most relevant messages are based on core values
      • Level One Values: Big ideas and concepts:
        • Responsibility
        • Personal liberty
        • Fairness
        • Family
        • Equality
        • Opportunity
        • Safety
  • Values
    • Most relevant messages are based on core values
      • Level Two Values: Issues and movements
        • Civil rights
        • Education and healthcare reform
        • Children’s education
        • Housing
        • The environment
  • Values
    • Most relevant messages are based on core values
      • Level Three Values: Specific policies or legislation:
        • TANF
        • Minimum wage
        • ARRA
      • Certain audiences may describe a value differently than other audience groups (i.e. the word responsibility)
  • Values Level One Theme: Big idea Level Two Theme: More detailed issues Level Three Theme: Specifics As advocates, we are on level 3, but general public is usually on Level 1!
  • Developing your message
    • Discuss your values, how you want to conversation to shift
    Central Message What do they think now? Supporting Message Values What do we want them to think?
  • Developing your message
    • Organize central messages and supporting messages
    Central Message Supporting Message Supporting Message Supporting Message
  • In Summary...
    • The media frames stories, and we can help influence those frames
    • Framing helps you cut through the clutter
    • Stick to people’s level 1 values
    • Develop your message so that you have one core message, and a few supporting messages
    Media Tools © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Pitching and Reacting
  • Planning the Pitch
    • Research is the key to a good pitch
    • Do your homework–pitch to the appropriate reporter, and know what they have written about before
    10/16/2008 Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Who do I contact?
    • Large newspaper: First pitch to Editor of specific section; second pitch to reporter you have relationship with
    • Small newspaper: Editor-in-chief
    • Radio: News director
    • TV: Assignment editor
    • Blog: Blog moderator
    • News website: Online editor
  • Leading up to the pitch…
    • Pick the right person to send the piece to
    • Send an individual email to that person (even if you need to send to multiple outlets)
    • Write a short, personalized email, then include the piece in the body copy, and attach it (include all of your contact info!)
  • Making the call…
    • Call the right person…identify yourself and your organization
    • Ask “are you on deadline?:
    • Pitch your idea
    • Offer to send background materials
    • Offer to work with the reporter to do the story
    • Thank them!
  • Making the call
    • Stay on topic
    • Be prepared to answer questions, but make sure they know it is just for background
    • Keep it short and simple
    • The goal of the goal is to get them to say “yes” to a story
    • Don’t leave a voicemail, call back
    • Don’t take things personally!
    Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Keep in mind…
    • Offer reporters something they need
    • Keep it brief
    • Begin with reporters you know
    • Offer a hook
    • Express enthusiasm
    • Be timely
    • Close the deal
    • Have one or two back-up angles
    • Don’t take anything personally!
  • When do I call?
    • Large newspaper: between 8 am and 10 am (always ask if they are on deadline)
    • Small newspaper: Editor-in-chief : between 8 am and 10 am; find out what day they go to print, if a weekly
    • Radio: Program director: 7 am
    • TV: Assignment editor: 7 am
    • Blog: Blog moderator: after 5 pm, normally
    • News website: Online editor: during business hours
  • Follow up
    • If you told the reporter you would get them information, SEND IT ASAP!
    • Remember, a pitch is just the beginning, once the reporter says ‘Go’ on a story, you need to be indispensable to them (coordinate interviews, get additional info, etc.)
    • If you don’t hear back from a reporter after a few days, make a follow-up call or email to check in
    • If a story results, send them an email to thank them for all their work
    10/16/2008 Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Continue the relationship
    • Be accessible –can journalists access your organization after hours and on weekends?Your contact info should be on web, email and voicemail
    • Be reliable –when you say you are going to fax them background, do it. If you say you will call them back in 5 minutes, do it.
    • Be helpful –send background, make calls for them, research things. If you can’t comment, suggest someone else that can. Have a press section on your web site. DO THE LEGWORK
    10/16/2008 Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Continue the relationship
    • Be timely –respond quickly to news stories that your organization cares about
    • Be honest –if you don’t know something, say so
    • Be credible –know your facts, give the real deal
    • Be human –enough said
    10/16/2008 Relationships with Journalists © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Reacting to a reporter: media caucus
    • Simply a tool we use to help us prepare for the media by getting clear on:
      • the issue
      • our message
      • our talking points
      • preparing for the media’s questions
      • preparing for the interview
  • Why we do a media caucus?
    • Helps stop the myths of press misquoting
    • Helps you effectively organize your message or issue
    • Prepares your spokesperson for the interview
    • Cross training for entire staff
  • When do you do a Media Caucus?
    • Proactive Media Work
    • Pitch a story
    • Press Conference
    • Letter to Editor/Op-ed
    • Reactive Media Work
    • Breaking news story
    • When media call for a comment
  • If the reporter calls you
    • First step is finding out the reporter’s angle
    • How do you find out? You ask!
    • Spend time with the reporter to learn what they are writing about and what part of the story they want you to tell
  • Start delivering your message
    • As you speak to the press, you will begin to formulate your message–start articulating your points on the phone
    • Doing this will help shape the story and the questions they ask of you
    • Give background materials to reporter prior to the interview
  • Pull together staff
    • Next step is for staff to caucus
    • Broaden the circle–include more staff than just the spokesperson
    • Work through the caucus sheet
    • Practice, practice, practice
  • Practice, practice, practice
    • This is the most important part of the media caucus!
    • Think through all the questions the reporter might ask – when you know the questions, you won’t be as nervous
    • Someone plays the reporter, asks all questions
    • Time for honesty, not for being nice!
  • Key Talking Points…Key Messages
    • Think through – what do you want people watching/listening to walk away with?
    • Stick to the message–use your sound bites
    • Short and simple–details are deadly!
    • Don’t talk in jargon
    • Remember your audience– they know very little about your issue!
  • The Actual Interview
    • Ask reporter if they need additional background materials
    • Check in with the reporter with additional information if you get it before or after the story runs
    • Have another staff present to write down questions asked
    • Listen to spokesperson’s answers
  • After the interview
    • Debrief after the reporter leaves
    • Watch the coverage–ask “Is our message clear?”
    • Ask someone else (not affiliated with your organization) to watch. Ask them, “What was the message?
    • Review what questions were asked
  • In Summary
    • Whether it is proactive or reactive outreach, always have your message pegged down before you talk with the press
    • Keep it simple with pitch calls
    • When reacting to media calls, caucus first!
    • Always debrief after the interview/call to see what worked, and what didn’t
    • The coverage will be your best indicator of how well you planned your pitch/reaction
  • Social Media: To Tweet or Not to Tweet?
  • What is Social Networking?
    • A web...all interconnected
    • Like-minded people sharing ideas and interests
    • Online community building
    • People yapping about their lives
  • Why is Social Networking a big deal?
    • Change in the media landscape
      • nearly 300 newspapers folded in 2009
      • eight magazines with a circulation of one million or more ceased publication
      • hundreds of editorial positions were eliminated in print media
      • 10,000 jobs lost in radio
      • more than 100 TV stations affected by Chapter 11 filings of parent companies
  • Isn’t it just a bunch of kids that use it?
    • NO !!! Here’s who is online that you could/should reach:
      • Colleagues
      • Members
      • Constituents
      • Policy-makers
      • Media
      • Donors
      • Board members
  • How does it help my organization?
    • FREE!
    • create real connections with real people
    • greater and more frequent engagement
    • new avenue to raise awareness, advocacy and funds
    • convenient
    • popular
    • quick to set up
    • two-way communication
    • another tool for your communications toolbox
  • So many sites...
  • Facebook: What it is
    • Site that lets people share updates photos, videos, articles, links and more with Friends who they have to approve to be in their network
    • Business and organizations can create “Fan Pages” which other Facebook users can “like”
    • By numbers alone, the most popular social networking site today, with more than 400 million registered users
    • If Facebook were a country, it would be the 4th largest behind China, US and India
  • Facebook: Why people love it
    • ME ME ME! Great way to promote yourself and your organization
    • Interactive multi-media...post photos, videos, links
    • Interactive web of friends
    • Reconnect with long-lost friends
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED NEWSFEED FACEBOOK ADS FRIEND SUGGESTIONS: YOUR DASHBOARD SEARCH BAR: EDIT PROFILE VIEW PROFILE, ACCOUNT SETTINGS REQUESTS: EVENTS CHAT CHAT FRIEND REQUESTS, MESSAGES, NOTIFICATIONS NEWSFEED VIEWS STATUS UPDATE
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED YOUR DASHBOARD
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED REQUESTS: sent from friends
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED FACEBOOK ADS FRIEND SUGGESTIONS: generated by Facebook EVENTS CHAT
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED NEWSFEED Show your friend’s photos, who they are friends with, interactions between your friends, and who “like” and comments on their status updates NEWSFEED VIEWS STATUS UPDATE
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the NEWSFEED NEWSFEED NEWSFEED VIEWS STATUS UPDATE NEWSFEED Also shows posts from the organizations you “like” as well as re-posts from friends.
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE STATUS UPDATE NEWSFEED YOUR ORGS PHOTO EDIT YOUR PAGE PEOPLE THAT “LIKE” YOUR ORG INSIGHTS INTO HOW YOUR PAGE IS DOING TABS
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE YOUR ORGS PROFILE PICTURE EDIT YOUR PAGE SUGGEST TO FRIENDS
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE PEOPLE THAT “LIKE” YOUR ORG INSIGHTS INTO HOW YOUR PAGE IS DOING
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE: The Wall
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE
  • Facebook: Anatomy of the PAGE
  • Facebook: Creating your page
  • Facebook: Best in Class
  • Twitter: What it is
    • Social networking service that allows users to communicate with their “Followers”
    • It’s open to anyone, so you can follow or be followed by people you know and people you don’t
    • communicate via short messages and updates called “tweets” that have a maximum length of 140 characters
  • Twitter: Why people love it
    • Changing the definition of “real time” news
    • Top reasons why people love Twitter
      • Finding love
      • Finding fame (big with YouTube, too)
      • Staying up to date on current events
      • Making friends around the world
      • Stalking Celebrities
      • Connecting with like-minded people (“Lost”ies)
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED Strategic Communications © Jeffreys and Ryan
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED: Timeline HANDLE REPLY OR“AT”ING SHORT URL RETWEETING
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED
  • Twitter: Anatomy of the FEED
  • Twitter: Best in Class
  • Twitter: THE LINGO
    • Tweet: A post to Twitter - text only, 140 characters maximum (including spaces)
    • Timeline: A series of tweets displayed on a Twitter page
    • Follow.: When you follow someone on Twitter, that means you elect to see in your timeline the tweets that they post
    • Your “friends”: are the people who you follow
    • Your “followers”: (a.k.a. “tweeps,” or “tweeple”) are the people who have chosen to see your tweets
    • @ Replies: Supports back-and-forth conversation via tweet replies
  • Twitter: THE LINGO
    • Direct (private) messages : sometimes abbreviated to “DM.” You can send private messages on Twitter that are visible only to you and the recipient
    • Short URLs: You can include links in your tweet simply by posting the complete URL, including “http://”
    • Hashtags: When you insert a # in front of keywords, you make it easy for Twitter users who don’t already follow you to find your public contributions to the coverage or discussion on that topic.
    • Trending: hashtags categorized by popularity, which depends on a vast number of people tweeting on the topic at the same time
  • Other great tools
    • YouTube
      • Online community where users can create, upload and share their videos
      • Thorough, searchable database of videos
      • YouTube is 2nd largest search engine next to Google. Every minute, 24 hours of video is uploaded to YouTube.
      • How your can use it
        • Organization Channel
        • Upload news clips, trainings, webinars,
        • Create a short promo video for your organization
  • Other great tools
    • Blogs:
      • a type of website, usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. "Blog" can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog .
        • News
        • Politics
        • Organizations
        • Community
  • Other great tools
    • Blogs: How you can work with bloggers
      • Build relationship with bloggers
      • Comment on blogs
      • Send info/help blogger write a blog
      • Write a blog
      • Promote a blog
      • Cross posting
      • Live blog
  • Other great tools
    • Blogs: Creating your own
      • blogger, wordpress, typepad
        • establish a strategy
        • define an editorial policy
        • find a voice
        • create compelling content
        • use keywords
        • post on a regular schedule
        • link from homepage
        • engage with readers
        • spread your content
  • 3 key questions to ask yourself before embarking in social media:
    • Do you have engaging content that provides indisputable value?
    • Can you maintain a consistent flow of content that can draw attention and inspire others to share and advocate
    • Where will the content come from? Internal resources? Volunteers? Board?
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  • Is social networking for you?
    • Start small...build big
    • Set goals...what are you trying to accomplish with your communications?
      • increase engagement
      • acquire new supporters of your work
      • raise money
      • increase membership
    • Define your audience...is social media a good tool to reach them? (it’s ok to say no!)
  • Making Social Networking Work in your Organization
    • If you decide that social media is a tool you want to use....
      • Meet with your team to discuss objectives
      • Put someone in charge of social networking (though many can be involved in generating content)
      • Define your tone, clarify your standards
      • Set a schedule
        • Create a posting calendar
      • Set standards and institute policy
        • Create a submission form
        • Create Social Media Policy form
      • Monitor how your sites are doing
  • How to use social media well
    • LEVEL 1 Involvement: “Listen” Mode
      • Create your profile
      • Follow/Friend those you feel are relevant (media, legislators, other orgs, your “competition”) so you can “listen” to what they say and stay up-to-date on what is going on/being discussed
        • Facebook: Do a search for keywords, pages or people relevant to your issues
        • Twitter: follow dialogues and research key issues using Twitter Search and hashtags (#). Create Twitter lists to keep track of these people
        • YouTube: watch videos on relevant topics or from similar organizations
        • blogs: keep a list of important blogs on your issues, and monitor them on a regular basis
  • How to use social media well
    • LEVEL 2 Involvement: “Reactive” Mode
      • Post timely information from your organization
        • news articles you are mentioned in
        • upcoming events you are hosting
        • new reports, materials, etc. from your organization
        • encourage people to sign-up to your e-news or donate
      • Reply to those that comment on your page/feed
  • How to use social media well
    • LEVEL 3 Involvement: “Proactive” mode
      • Come up with new content for your page/feed
        • contest
        • polls
        • exclusive content for your social media users
      • Comment, interact and encourage conversation on other pages/feeds
        • use @tagging
        • Retweet/repost information
        • comment on relevant blogs and encourage bloggers to post on a certain issue
      • Host online events via social media sites
        • Twitter parties / Twinterviews
        • Event Invitations via Facebook
  • How to promote your page and get followers
    • Twitter: follow people
    • Facebook: Suggest to friends (and have others suggest to friends!)
    • Promote in all aspects of your marketing
      • E-news
      • website
      • e-signatures
      • at events
      • donor materials
    • Be a resource, and they will seek you out
  • Cardinal Rules of Creating Content
    • Key word in social marketing: SOCIAL. Be social! Share photos, tell stories, and offer great content that your followers will want to share with their fans
      • Write in a personal tone
      • Use “we”
      • Write as if it is a 1-1 experience
  • Cardinal Rules of Nonprofit Social Networking
    • Be human: establish a familiar and appropriate tone
    • Expect the unexpected: Plan, experiment, adapt
    • Be relevant: acknowledge and build upon the existing community and what members are already talking about
    • Be patient: building a following takes time; be in it for the long-term
    • Listen: follow what others are saying, don’t just be a “volume-out” experience
    • Be transparent: communicate as if it was a face to face experience’
    • Stay active and involved
    • Promote sharing and seek dialogue
  • Remember...
    • People often stress the importance of reaching certain numbers of followers/fans on Twitter, Facebook, etc., but the essence of social media lies in relationship building in an effort to build a community.
    • It’s not about using the latest tools…but the tools that work for you.
    • It’s not about listening to experts, it’s about person-to-person, genuine interaction that you will have with people. You will find the most value in your own experiences with social media.
  • In Summary
    • Social networking is one big web
    • Start small, build big...3 levels of involvement
    • Be genuine and real
    • Social networking is just one tool in the tool box of communications tactics
  • Conclusion...what we learned
    • Start small…build big
    • Plan your work and work your plan
    • Put your logo on everything!
    • Working with the media starts with database and systems
    • There are more tools in the toolbox than just a press conference
    • Framing is essential, and caucusing is crucial
    • Social networking is one big web that you can use to your organization’s advantage