Women & social peace in egypt oct 23 final
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  • Meaning of Social Peace.PEACE May be defined as absence of negative aspects like violence and the attendance of positive ones like calm, stability, health, growth, etc, so that we can achieve SOCIAL PEACE Every society consists of group of humans varying by nature form each other even in their religion or doctrine affiliation, social or professional position, but they all collected by what we can call "social contract"; which means unwritten obligation between them tackling rights and duties of each party in society. Breaking this contract is a violation of one party's rights, and prejudices other's obligations so decisive interference is critically needed to correct situation.Form this viewpoint, social contract is:1- Expressing balance case between social parties differed in benefits, power, abilities, wills.2- This balance kept by "power", it is not necessarily "muscles power" i.e. violence but it is power of law and legislation.3- It helps to solve conflicts and disagreements as it is regarded the reference all different parties referred to it.
  • Expectation helps to do this. Every party expects the other to do specific action towards its duties and obligations, if he did not do it so it  is regarded as violation of common social contract.For example, if the employer has obligations towards employees, so in the other side the employer has rights obliged on employees. Violation of any of them leads to violation of social contract and need correction.There are two kinds of social contract, the first is direct the other in indirect.1-Direct social contract: is the contract that parties make as it was defined before; as defining place, time, and exchange expectation of all parties. For example the contract to built a building, the first party (land owner and financer) expected the second party (contracting comity or even normal contractor) to end building up the building in the pre-agreed qualities, and that delivering process done through levels pre-defined. The second party expected the first one to give material return on lights of the obligations. Thus, exchanging expectations between two parties became clear.2- Indirect social contract: is the contract that related to values, standers, feelings, trends, and what is generally agreed between parties, also breaking this law rouse denouncement. For example, word promise between merchant parties, and truth in relations
  • The report, "Does the Egyptian Woman Play an Active Role in Political Life?", added that the percentage of women working in distinguished administrative posts hit 14.2 percent, and rose to 25.5 percent of the director general positions. The percentage of women working as diplomatic attaches rose to 29.3 percent as well.Despite progress in these sectors, the number of female members of parliament has decreased from nine percent in the 1979-1984 parliamentary session, to two percent between 2005 and 2010, said the report. To address this issue, there have been suggested amendments to the People's Assembly Law 38/1972, which allocates 64 parliamentary seats to women for two year sessions and currently in 2012 we are still waiting for the new constitution especially that women were considered absent in the post 25 January revolution parliament that was dissolved by a court order.Currently we are not in the position to present any statistics until we achieve stability in the political life in Egypt.
  • When I started thinking about who to write about I found myself drowning in names .. I though that the best way is the group them according the the Rotary Areas of focus … But again all activities are cross checked with more than one area of focus though it might mainly focus on one …. Let us remember together the Rotary areas of focus that are based on the millenium goals .. Peace and conflictprevention/resolutionDisease prevention and treatmentWater and sanitationMaternal and child healthBasic education and literacyEconomic and community development
  • How to choose and who to choose has been a dilemma and I restructured and rethought my presentation on daily basis since I was requested by PDG Helen Rieseler in September 2012 … I thought that I wouHodaShaarawi circa 1925ld look around me and start picking those who have positive impact on the development of our soceity … and may be take through history with a link to the present … ===============Huda Shaarawi (1879-1947) Egyptian nationalist and feminist  The leader of the feminist movement in Egypt. Not only did she study in Europe and accompany her husband to many political meetings, but in 1923 she removed her face veil in public. She led the first women's street demonstration, the first women's social service organization, and published the first feminist magazine.She is listed as one of 30 of the Most Influential Women of the Millennium A street has been named after her========================================Shaarawi was a feminist nationalist activist all her life. Born to a wealthy family, she helped establish the Union of Educated Egyptians Women in 1914 and led the first women's demonstration in the Egyptian Revolution of 1919. She founded the Egyptian Feminist Union, focusing on woman's education and changes in the Personal Sautes laws. Returning from the International Alliance for Women Suffrage Congress in Rome in 1923, Shaarawi famously removed her veil in public, the first woman of her stature to do so.====================================================A brief history:HodaShaarawi was a pioneer Egyptian feminist leader and nationalist. Born in Al Minya, she was a daughter of Muhammad Sultan, and was taught to read the Qur'an and tutored in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic subjects by Muslim women tutors in Cairo. She wrote poetry in both Arabic and French. She was married to her cousin, Ali Shaarawi. She helped to organize Mubarrat Muhammad Ali, a women's social service organization, in 1909 and the Union of Educated Egyptian Women in 1914, the year in which she traveled to Europe for the first time. She helped lead the first women's street demonstration during the 1919 Revolution and was elected president of the Wafdist Women's Central Committee. In 1923 Shaarawi founded and became the first president of the Egyptian Feminist Union. She led Egyptian women pickets at the opening of Parliament in January 1924 and submitted a list of nationalist and feminist demands, which were ignored by the Wafdist government, whereupon she resigned from the Wafdist Women's Central Committee. She continued to lead the Egyptian Feminist Union until her death, publishing the feminist magazine l'Egyptienne (and al-Misriyya), and representing Egypt at women's congresses in Graz, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Marseilles, Istanbul, Brussels, Budapest, Copenhagen, Interlaken, and Geneva. She was instrumental in 1944 in convening the first Arab Feminist Conference and in 1945 in forming the Arab Feminist Union, which called for solidarity with the Arabs of Palestine. She also proposed internationalizing the Suez Canal and. Even if only some of her demands were met during her lifetime, she laid the groundwork for later gains by Egyptian women and remains the symbolic standard-bearer for their liberation movement.================Who is Huda Shaarawi?A lifelong feminist and nationalist activist who grew up in a wealthy family during the last of the harem years, Huda Shaarawi was born in Minya, Upper Egypy in 1879. Married to her older cousin at the age of 13, she separated from him after little more than a year and did not see him until they reconciled seven years later and had two children, Bathna and Muhammad. When her husband died in 1923, Huda was in a unique position of independence, having no surviving male family members to take care of. She used her considerable wealth and energy to build and support the movement for women’s equality. Huda Shaarawi as a Social ActivistIn 1908, Huda Shaarawi created the first philanthropic society run by Egyptian woman. This society provided social services for poor women and children. Huda considered women-run charities as especially important because they not only gave women an outlet through which they could learn practical knowledge and skills, focusing their energies outside the confines of the home, it also helped change the image of women, showing they could be strong and self-sufficient. Huda also founded the Intellectual Association of Egyptian women in 1914, an organization that began when Marguerite Clement offered to give a lecture for women during a visit to Egypt. Soon, Egyptian women were also giving lectures and the Association was born. In 1923 Huda founded the Egyptian Feminist Union, an organization that promoted women’s suffrage, better education, and changes in personal status laws. She presided over this organization until 1947. Huda was the founding president of the Arab Feminist Union. She spoke at the Ninth Congress of the International Women’s Suffrage Alliance in Rome in May of 1923, however, as her views became more pan-Arab, she distanced herself from the organization. Huda was also a member of the International Alliance of Women for Suffrage and Equal Citizenship, of which she became the vice president in 1935.Huda Shaarawias a Nationalist ActivistHuda Shaarawi was equally remarkable as a nationalist activist. In 1919, she led a march of women against the British. She was president of the Wafidist Women’s Central Committee, a committee created to coordinate women’s efforts in the independence movement, from 1920-1924.Huda Shaarawi's MagazinesHuda Shaarawi founded two magazines, l’Egyptienne (1925), and al-Misriyya (1937) and supported the founding of al-Mara al-Arabiyya, the newsletter of the Arab Feminist Union. She spoke on women’s issues and concerns throughout the Arab world and Europe.
  • Philanthropic Work  Shaarawi was involved in philanthropic projects throughout her life. In 1908, she created the first philanthropic society run by Egyptian women, offering social services for poor women and children. She argued that women-run social service projects were important for two reasons. First, by engaging in such projects, women would widen their horizons, acquire practical knowledge and direct their focus outward. Second, such projects would challenge the view that all women are creatures of pleasure and beings in need of protection.To Shaarawi, problems of the poor were to be resolved through charitable activities of the rich, particularly through donations to education programs. Holding a somewhat romanticized view of poor women's lives, she viewed them as passive recipients of social services, not to be consulted about prio
  • 1970 : Licence de la faculté des lettres (section presse) de l’Université du Caire.1996 : Médaille du gouvernorat de Guiza pour son rôledans la promotion de l’économie et du travail social.1998 : Intègre le Top 50 des meilleures femmes d’affaires du monde de la revue américaine Fortune.2002 : Reconnaissance de son travail social par le Croissant-Rouge.2006 : Intègre le Top 50 des meilleures 50 femmes d’affaires du monde arabe de la revue américaine Forbes=====Naela Allouba joined this year's Top 50 Business Women of the Arab American magazine Forbes. Fervent patriot, she reconciles her charity in its efforts to expand the industrial strength of Egypt.2006 : Intègre le Top 50 des meilleures 50 femmes d’affaires du monde arabe de la revue américaine ForbesThe lady both worldsPositive elements and components of its strong personality and vitality, she draws from an earlier period. The memory of the past, iconic personalities, ideas, behaviors leased back to full speed. His uncle, Mohammed Ali Pasha Allouba, fervent politician and lawyer, full of dignity and patriotism, illuminated his childhood.She discusses and defines fondly. "My uncle called the union of Arabs and greater vigilance and discernment vis-à-vis the Protocols of Zion leaders and their expansionist and colonialist project in the Arab region. It had to be clear about the issues not to deceive enemy. " Mohamad Ali Pasha Allouba accompanied Saad Pasha Zaghloul as well as a trip to London to negotiate the country's independence and the end of the British occupation. He has also gained international recognition for legitimate membership of the Wailing Wall Arabic heritage. Another beautiful character ChaarawiHoda, a feminist avant la lettre, a friend of the family Naela, made him love social work, public utility. "HodaChaarawi was attached to the idea of ​​wanting to stimulate the vitality of women to change their condition, educate. She played the role in this regard sting, stimulating their enthusiasm by its inventiveness and its proximity to centers of decision. She thought that the Ottoman Caliphate had struck the Islamic Sharia, pro-woman, a retrograde seal, "says Naela. He added: "She was so anxious to encourage the independence of women, asserting its identity and the strengthening of its social contribution. It is in this sense that it has established the Union of Arab women, the precursor of the League of Arab States. " In the warmth and softness of this woman and her uncle, Naela is open to life. She will come to her words and images, but also the memories that have enchanted light once, and clasped in a gesture of romance the dispute to the vivacity of tone.In her teens, she lives with HodaChaarawi moments of genius and a tenacious will to achieve something. Through her uncle, she observes the policy and retains close political consciousness awake this long. But she led a young woman protected and bourgeois alongside his cousin Ali Mohamad Adel Allouba, which follows the same path as his father, and she married for love. That, until his three daughters reach the tray. There, she decides to resume her interrupted studies at the time of his marriage, his hands to shape his own life and engage in the world of work. As if she would compensate those years when it was not clear agreements and duty to fulfill its mission in the first wife of a great lawyer and mother.Changing her life, she arranged to his liking. She finished a pot of English and joined the faculty of letters, press section at the University of Cairo. After her studies, she is learning the art of the press under the auspices of the great writer and journalist Ahmad Bahaeddine, the magazine Al-Moussawar. Therefore, he says writing a great article on the contribution of women in the Revolution of 1919. It produces a report on the subject, and his company is enlightening, combining testimonies and private moments, reflection and study. She receives praise from all. However, in the dark days of the censure sharp, we wanted to silence his voice claiming a positive antipathy vis-à-vis the reduction of politics to the exercise of personal power, law and custom corruption becomes gradually drift towards authoritarianism. But this does not alter the fever to get a grip on the world, because every act is, in itself, a challenge to the facility. She abandons the topic social entrusted to him the magazine Al-Moussawar and decided to tackle the area of ​​trade. She was introduced to the regulation, governing with the Chamber of Commerce and eventually get the upper hand of officer position a major French company, Interagra export grain, fertilizer, chicken and meat. "The owner of the company has entrusted to me, then, the position of Director of its subsidiary in Egypt, Epytrade. I so enjoyed this work helped me to introduce Egyptian products such as fertilizer company Abouqir on the foreign market, "recalls Naela.After two years of strong experience and knowledge, she founded her own company, Nahal import-export, legal consultation and technical assistance to commercial projects. His business is booming. "My job in business is a jump, somersault towards life, towards the energy to live," and defines it. She discovers that she is not a mother first and foremost, subject to its proprieties brave husband rubbed. It becomes itself every day and attends the awakening of his soul demanding. Carried by the momentum she founded with a group of his peers in 1976, the Association of Egyptian businessmen, where she chairs the export. "We live in a time when the progress of a nation can be measured by the extent of its exports," she admits. Since it leads to a fierce battle with the Chambers of Commerce, major councils and associations to promote exports. Tenacity, perseverance and strong determination influence real and deep on his entourage.In 1982, several years after the conclusion of the Camp David agreement and the boycott of Egypt by the Arabs, Naela goes to the idea that "the installation of barriers more impassable against the union and Arab cooperation necessarily involves the dispersion of their efforts and their wealth. A concentration of investments in favor of large structures of interaction and production of them is essential. This is the great lesson that we should learn to model interaction US-European. To all of us to imagine solutions for regulatory and professional guarantee ". It organizes a big meeting in Cairo between businessmen and Egyptian Arabic to study the modalities of their cooperation. His initiative was born on Arab Business Council in the Egyptian Association Egyptian businessmen. "By supporting 176 Arab millionaires in their step, sometimes offering some of our lean organization to benefit from legal and practical advice, this is the balance of Arab cooperation that we support, thereby preventing processes that our doors are put in jeopardy. Of course we are united, no offense to those who would have liked it otherwise, "she says.
  • OverviewAl Nour Wal Amal (Light & Hope) Association is an Egyptian non-governmental organization.The Association was founded on 1 October 1954 by a group of volunteers working at the Red Crescent of the welfare of the blind headed by Mrs. IstiklalRadi, The Association first president. And LofeyaNamwq the first treasurer Al Nour Wal Amal is a free boarding, educational institution, and a non-profit organization. Its members are as well as its officers are all volunteers. It opened its doors in 1957 to welcome 40 blind girls, of whom the school age children enrolled in the school, while the older children joined the vocational training program. [collapse]MissionThe primary aim of Al Nour Wal Amal Association is to fulfill the rights of blind girls and women by providing them with free education, literacy programs, vocational training and job opportunities in order to develop their potentialities and their special abilities such as musical talents, to … [read more]ensure their physical and psychological health and to allow them to develop their own identities and become self dependent integrated members of the society. [collapse]ImpactToday, the Association cares for 300 girls and women.The Music Institute Orchestra began as a group of 15 girls, and over the years developed into a Chamber Orchestra of 34 girls, with all four sections; strings, woodwind, brass and percussion, and has become the most famous part of the Nour Wal … [read more]Amal Association. Several conductors have contributed to its activities.During the last twenty years, the Orchestra was trained and conducted by the late Maestro Ahmed AbulEid, who had succeeded in developing special techniques and methods to enable the girls to perform as an orchestra without the need to read the notes while performing, and without the very essential dependence on the famous “batin” of the conductor. The Orchestra is composed of blind girls with different levels of music education. The girls learn to play their musical parts separately and they train twice a week as an orchestra. [collapse]
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7Pf-_J9sIkOverviewAl Nour Wal Amal (Light & Hope) Association is an Egyptian non-governmental organization.The Association was founded on 1 October 1954 by a group of volunteers working at the Red Crescent of the welfare of the blind headed by Mrs. IstiklalRadi, The Association first president. And LofeyaNamwq the first treasurer Al Nour Wal Amal is a free boarding, educational institution, and a non-profit organization. Its members are as well as its officers are all volunteers. It opened its doors in 1957 to welcome 40 blind girls, of whom the school age children enrolled in the school, while the older children joined the vocational training program. [collapse]MissionThe primary aim of Al Nour Wal Amal Association is to fulfill the rights of blind girls and women by providing them with free education, literacy programs, vocational training and job opportunities in order to develop their potentialities and their special abilities such as musical talents, to … [read more]ensure their physical and psychological health and to allow them to develop their own identities and become self dependent integrated members of the society. [collapse]ImpactToday, the Association cares for 300 girls and women.The Music Institute Orchestra began as a group of 15 girls, and over the years developed into a Chamber Orchestra of 34 girls, with all four sections; strings, woodwind, brass and percussion, and has become the most famous part of the Nour Wal … [read more]Amal Association. Several conductors have contributed to its activities.During the last twenty years, the Orchestra was trained and conducted by the late Maestro Ahmed AbulEid, who had succeeded in developing special techniques and methods to enable the girls to perform as an orchestra without the need to read the notes while performing, and without the very essential dependence on the famous “batin” of the conductor. The Orchestra is composed of blind girls with different levels of music education. The girls learn to play their musical parts separately and they train twice a week as an orchestra. [collapse]
  • http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=182137365176948&set=a.176215115769173.44600.176215032435848&type=1&theater#!/pages/Parents-Sons-Association-%D8%AC%D9%85%D8%B9%D9%8A%D8%A9-%D8%A7%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%A1-%D9%88%D8%A3%D8%A8%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%A1/176215032435848She serves on several NGOs specially and Parents and Sons where she leads the Fundraising and awareness activities . The NGO that aims to integrate children with special needs in the society, particularly children with mental challenges like down syndrome and autism. Parents and Sons is an NGO that aims to integrate children with special needs in the society, particularly children with mental challenges like down syndrome and autism.
  • EGYPTIAN SOCIETY FOR VILLAGE DEVELOPMENT  ESTABLISHED ON 2007 AT AGHOUR ALKOBRA VILLAGE – TOUKH – QALIOUBIYA. MAIN PROJECT-:Establishment & Foundation of KIDNEY DIALYSIS MEDICAL CENTER At AghourAlkobra Village . Consisting of the following:- -Filterage water unit for haemodialysis. - -Eight units of haemodialysis machines with an approximate cost LE520,000 Including one machine for virus ( c ). -Electricity unit of measure. -The building of the Society consists of six floors with an approximate cost for construction of LE1,800,000. -The center of the society is built on a land space of 620m & has been granted to us as a Donation from the owner who is a resident of the village with an approx. of LE620,000 . -The Society is providing financial support to those patients who are unable toWork in addition to their medical care.  - - NOW we are working at Kidney Dialysis Medical Center one shift per day ( 21 patients ). - - IN THE FUTURE we will working three shifts per day ( 63 patients ) .  OTHER PROJECTS :- -Participation in CLE literacy projects with 10 classes in AghourAlkobra. -EGYPT. SOC. FOR VILLAGE DEV. is providing interest free micro loans to Support women & new generation to start a small projects. . -Support the handicaps : Distribution of 85 wheel chairs to handicaps. - Iftar for 100 persons during the month of Ramadan yearly since 2007. -Clothes exhibition yearly at Benha & Cairo University. -Distribution of food stuff bags to 300 families yearly. - Distribution of 200 bed mattresses ( jansen ) & 200 blankets to 200 families. -Full support of 50 orphans. -Support the project will taking care of street children. -Donation 5 computer units to illiteracy classes. -To cause to enter pure water mains to three village in Qalioubiya.   THE FUTURE PLAN OF THE EGYPTIAN SOCIETY FOR VILLAGE DEV. -TO ESTABLISH :-  -External Clinics. -Training center for new generation. -Computer center. -Permanent literacy classes. CHAIRMAN GEHANE HALAWA  NAME : GehaneHalawaBatchlor of Commerce / Accountant Master in Business Administration CAIRO UNIVERSITYLyceeFrancais –Heliopolis LANGUAGE : French & English POSITION: Member of Parliament ( Previously ) Owner & Chairman of MS CO. Chairman of Egyptian Society of Village Development Past President & one of the Founder of Rotary Club of El Tahrir Past President & founder of Inner Wheel Club of El Tahrir Founder of RotarAct El Tahrir Vice President & one of the Founder of Osraty Society Board Member of Hope Village Society Member of HodaShaarawy Society Treasurer & one of the Founder of Hayaty Society ( Previously ) Vice President & Treasurer of Lions Club ( Previously )
  • Vision for Environmental and Training Consultancy Services (VEATCS)- Beni-Sweif  President : Ms. Fawziya El-Senosy Executive Manager: Ms. GhadaTosson VEACTS implemented Technologies of Participation (TOP) Workshops for all Local partner NGOs in district of Beba and Naeem VillagesIn collaboration with the Finish Embassy , VEATCS implemented the Bilharzia Combat Project at Ezbet Islam, as well as Naeem VillageIn collaboration with the Finish Embassy , VEATCS implemented the proliferation and plantation of the Nim trees in villages around metropolitan Beni-Sweif City VEACTS led a potable water and sanitary drainage project in needy villages of Hager Ben-Soliman and Al-3awawna  
  • MalakZaaloukMalakZaalouk will be joining the Graduate School of Education in the fall of 2010-2011 as Visiting Professor of Practice. Dr. Zaalouk’s professional career includes serving as UNICEF Regional Senior Education Adviser for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) (2005-2010). Dr. Zaalouk joined UNICEF in April 1992 as the Education Section chief in Egypt.  She was engaged in the founding of community schools/education and has promoted Girls’ education and Quality Education ReformPrior to joining UNICEF, Dr. Zaalouk was Lecturing in University and was an Expert in the National Research center.  She was also engaged in a number of committees and organizations on human rights and gender issues.  She has published a number of books and has numerous articles in her name on development issues.  Dr. Zaalouk an Egyptian national, holds a Diploma in Educational planning from the International Institute of  Educational Planning IIEP in Paris, a  Ph.D in Social Anthropology form the University of Hull UK, an MA in Sociology from the American University in Cairo and a BA in Political Science from the same University.Research Interests: Political economy of reform and social change,gender, education and development, empowerment, participation and development, liberation education, comparative education, quality education, community participation and education, transitions from school to life. Publications:Professor zaalouk’s publications are in Arabic and English. Some of her publications include:English Books:Zaalouk, M. and others, Law and population,1974, The National Center for Social and     Criminal ResearchZaalouk, M., Class, Class, Power and Foreign Capital in Egypt: The Emergence of a    new bourgeoisie, Zed Books, London1989.Zaalouk,M., The Children of the Nile, Innovation series, UNESCO, 1995Zaalouk, M., Women in the Egyptian Labour Force in Egypt: The central Agency for     public mobilization and statistics, 1996Zaalouk,M., Background Author for the Arab Human Development Development Report,     UNDP, 2002 Creating Opportunities For the coming generationsZaalouk, M, The Pedagogy of Empowerment: Community Schools as a Social     Movement in Egypt. American University in Cairo Press 2004Zaalouk,M., Author of the Education component in the Egypt Human Development     Report  Choosing our Future: Towards a new Social Contract , UNDP, 2005Zaalouk,M., “ Mediation and Innovations: The Case of Egypt” in Oxfam Girls’ Education     and partnerships  2005Arabic Books:Women and National Development, Arab Documentation center and UNESCO, 1984.Women Workers in the textile and food industries, ESCWA,1989 Ikhtab, The social History of a village, The National Center For Social and criminological research, 1995.Al Ta’aleem Min Agl al Tamkin: Madares al Mogtama’, Namouzag le HarakaIjtima’eyaFiMisr, (Community Schools as a social movement in Egypt), Elias, 2007.In addition, Dr. Zaalouk has extensive articles in both English and Arabic. MalakZaalouk:Making it workIf children won't go to school -- well, the schools will just have to go to them. Meet the woman who believes in revolution, and then helps bring it about Profile by PascaleGhazaleh
  • YasminHelalFounder and Director, Educate-MeCo-Founder, Taleeda Foundation NGO   YasminHelal: an Athlete, Engineer, Entrepreneur, Photographer and above all: an ever-growing curious child in constant research for meaning. Yasmin spent 19 years of her life as a Professional Basketball Player. Along her journey, she received 38 medals, was the captain of Gezira Sporting Club Team for several years and played for the Egyptian National Team.  In 2007, Yasmin received her Bachelor Degree in Systems and Bio-Medical Engineering from Cairo University and graduated with High Honors. Yasmin’s curiosity pushed her to pursue a career in Telecommunications; a field completely different from her area of expertise. In December 2007, she was hired by the Telecom Giant Alcatel-Lucent, where she initially worked as a Field Network Engineer then later as a Middle East and Africa Network Design Engineer. In April 2011, Yasmin joined Wild Guanabna to support Omar Samra in building up both his Educational and Voluntourism arms, serving student and adult adventure and learning seekers.  In 2010, Yasmin’s sense of Social Responsibility and Entrepreneurial spirit pushed her to start up a small initiative named Educate-Me to help financially underprivileged children go to School. Educate-Me later turned into a Social Enterprise that's touching the lives of hundreds of people everyday through mentoring and inspiring them to fight for their dreams and pursue happiness they way they see fit; both on the short and long term. In September 2011, Yasmin quit her full-time job and decided to solely focus on Educate-Me; becoming its full-time Executive Director. Along the journey of starting up Educate-Me,Yasmin partnered with 2 Egyptian Entrepreneurs and together started up Taleeda Non-Profit Foundation, which aims to activate Social Entrepreneurs in Egypt. Finally, after figuring out that Education and Entrepreneurship are both her passions, Yasmin decided to complement her field experience with some Academic theory by pursuing her Masters in International Education Management at the University of Education in PH-Ludwigsburg, Germany.         About Educate-Me   Educate-Me is an Egyptian Social Enterprise that was founded in June 2010 to serve financially underprivileged children at the outskirts of Giza, Egypt. It started off as a humble effort to reinstate school dropouts to Public Schools by financially sponsoring their fees and school gadgets, but later turned into an enterprise that is striving to redefine Education through tapping on its real purpose. While working with children (age group 6-13), Educate-Me developed a very deep understanding of human potential, motivation and dreams, and started working towards developing an Education system that allows humanity to flourish. An education that would bring about people who pursue what they really want and would push boundaries in every field of knowledge, driven by their passion and curiosity. One that raises generations of learners, who can learn, unlearn and relearn, who have the courage and perseverance to change both themselves and the world around them; to create the world of their dreams.Educate-Me adopts a highly child-lead goal-oriented learning approach that empowers children to identify their goals, and figure out the means to reach them through capitalizing on their strengths and mobilizing their surrounding resources. It is currently delivered as a non-formal Education system that is running side by side with the Public Schooling of the children, but is developing towards a holistic system that should replace the current one.Finally, believing in the importance of the environment and capitalizing on the community social capital, Educate-Me is establishing its physical presence in the community it serves through establishing a community development center that serves both the children and their parents.  
  • Im ... Dr OLA RAGAB...Prof of rheumatology and Rehabilitation FACULTYof MEDICINE CAIRO UNIVERSITY...{KASR AL AINI _SCHOOL OF MEDICINE}_Manager and CEO of FUNDRAISING DEPARTMENT of KASR AL AINI SCHOOL OFMEDICINE {since 2003_extended}       _2004_2006 total sum of 24 million Egypt pounds.differerentrequirments in hospitals and faculty       _2008_2010 total sum of 72 million Egypt pounds'' '' '' '' '' '' '' ''       _2012 total of 73million Egt pounds founding of a new hospitalof emrgency and burns in  KASR AL AiNI campus {contain 400 inpatientsbeds,12 surgical theaters,6 wards for burn cases...still on going itsfunraising for a total of 180 million}       _project director with the NGO'S especially the ROTARY with acomplete partenership in building capacity and softskilltraining andillitracy,together with fullfurnishing 6 surgical theaters andneonatal skillfull nurses on job training {27 nurses},biuldingcapacities in engineering for 32 employer in engineering department,sponsering 18 open heartsurgery for infants below 4 years old, fundingthe emergency unit with antiseptic antibiotic enoug for 4 months {EUyearly turn over 2.400,000 cases}......_-Founder and president of FRIENDS OF RA and AUTO IMMUNEARTHROPATHYASSOCIATION in2010 ,its a RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS patients groupconcerned for EPIDEMIOLOGIC reashers and FIELD THEURAPEUTIC CONVOYS,5convoys diagnostic and therapeutic together with a study based upon RAin EGYPT,6 AWARNESS campains.-counceler of LUXOR GOUVERNER 2009-2011,OF Medical affairs [forraising up the medical servises in LUXOR by TRAINING and continouslearning and contacts with KASR AL AINI STAFF thrw MEDICALPROTOCOL,together with medical convoys to the urban areas }.-Board member of HODA SHAARAWY ASSOCIATION FOR WOMENRISE FOUNDEDIN1923_BM since 2004{concerd with orphens,school prep andsecondary,charity preschool nursery,handwoovenknitingteatchingclasses,charitybazzars}
  •    مني رجب كاتبة صحفية اشتهرت في مصر بكتابتها التي تدعو للتنوير ولتقدم المجتمعات العربية و لحقوق المرأة المصرية،اصدرت 10 كتب في القصة القصيرة و التحليلات الادبية و حصلت 3 مرات علي جائزة احسن كتاب في معرض القاهرة الدولي للكتاب 1998 (وجوة بلا رتوش) ، 2000 (التاريخ امراة) ، 2001 (النساء قادمات)، تكتب حاليا في جريدة الاهرام اليومية كل اربعاء مقالة بعنوان حديث الصباح.ترجمت قصصها الي عدة لغات منها الالمانية و الانجليزية و الايطالية و الصينية.تحولت بعض قصصها الي مسلسلات تلفزيونية و اذاعية مثل عندما تثور النساء، و بفعل فاعل. كما تولت عدة مناصب صحفية في جريدة الاهرام اليومية و هي حاليا كاتبة و مدير تحرير الاهرام و مستشار رئيس التحرير و هي ايضا تدعو الي تدعيم المجتمع المدني ليؤدي دورة في تنمية بلدها كما تطالب بحرية التعبير و حرية الاعلام و بضرورة تطوير المجتمع المصري من خلال تطوير التعليم و حقوق الانسان و نشر الثقافة و دعم دور المراة و ضرورة مشاركتها في كل المجالات . مثلت مصر في عدة مؤتمرات دولية و عربية . كما هي ايضا من ابرز المدافعين عن صياغة و تطوير حقوق المراة و الطفل في بلدها و هي مشاركة فعالة في الدفاع عن تقدم الفن المصري و ارتقاء و مساندة المبدعين في كل المجالات و تدعو ايضا لمساندة الكثير من الانشطة الخيرية لسد احتياجات الفقراء الاساسية ، هي ايضا رئيسة لجمعية اسرتي التي تاسست في مدينة القاهرة 2008 و عضو بارز لعدد من الجمعيات في مصر مثل جمعية هدي شعراوي(تاسست عام 1928 ) و مستشار اللجنة العليا لمهرجان القاهرة السينيمائي الدولي و نائب رئيس مجلس ادارة جمعية الكاتبات المصريات و عضو لاتحاد الكتاب المصري و نقابة الصحفيين و عضو شرفي في مؤسسات اجتماعية مثل الانرويل و الروتاري و مستشار لمجلة الروتاري المصريمع خالص شكري و تحياتيمني رجب
  • Dr. FatmaKhafagy, is a prominent women’s rights activist as well as a founding member of one of Egypt’s new parties.For years Dr. FatmaKhafagy has advocated the respect of human rights with a particular focus on the rights of women in Egypt. In the wake of the Egyptian revolution, she followed a calling to seek influence more directly as she became a founding member of the newly established party, People’s Socialist Alliance===========================FatemaKhafagy  Dr. FatemaKhafagy is a graduate of Faculty of Economics and political Science of Cairo University. She holds a Ph.D in Development Planning from University of London. She is a political and a feminist activist who has participated in the Egyptian revolution since January 2011. She was active in Tahrir square during the two weeks of the revolution providing the demonstrators with food, blankets and medicines, demonstrating for the causes of the revolution and for recognizing women’s role in the revolution and in the transition to democracy. She is a board member of the Alliance for Arab Women who with other 15 feminist NGOs in Egypt formed the Egyptian Feminist Coalition who are organizing demonstrations and protests against excluding Egyptian women by the Military council and the consecutive cabinets. She is also the coordinator of the Egyptian/Tunisian committee on Arab revolutions and gender equality.She has also participated in founding the People’s Socialist Alliance party registered after the revolution, ensuring that her party is calling for gender equality and for women’s participation in all walks of life. Alarmed with other feminists because of the exclusion of women after the revolution from decision making positions, she is diligently working on suggesting drafts of the constitution that ensure women’s rights and gender equality, works in developing statements on the role of women published by her party in different newspapers and giving speeches inside and outside Egypt about the role of women in building democratic Egypt.
  • LailaIskandar KamelChairperson Dr. Kamel is an Education and Development Specialist who offers a compelling combination of in-depth knowledge and international exposure as a result of providing consultancy services for UNESCO, USAID, UNDP and many others. Committed to an integrated, grass roots approach to development; she has helped CID clients in devising highly successful programs which address a range of community concerns. Dr. Kamel's academic background includes studies in Economics, Political Science and Business at Cairo University. She holds a Master of Arts in Teaching Near-Eastern Studies and International Education Development from the University of California (Berkeley, USA). She also holds a Doctorate of Education from Columbia University (New York, USA).COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT   In order to be effective and sustainable, projects require a vision for a better community as well as experience in the sector. Our team is passionate about development and trained to provide strategies for sustainability. Our diverse experience means that we deal with projects on a case-by-case basis ? a methodology that allows us to examine each project holistically, yet always in context.   Under the leadership of Dr. LailaIskander Kamel, our Community Development department has worked on projects that encourage social entrepreneurship in both individuals and organizations. We also work closely with NGOs, enabling them to effectively assess and remedy obstacles to development.  Our experience over the past 15 years spans the areas of environment, solid wastemanagement/ recycling,education, gender-based empowerment, capacity-building of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), income-generation for persons employed in the informal sector, and working children.    ENVIRONMENT   Developing and supporting community-based recycling schemesNational waste management strategy across MENA Promoting development in the informal and semi-formal sectors   EDUCATION  Designing formal and non-formal educational curriculaTeacher training Developing and facilitating adult education programs Evaluating and monitoring of formal and non-formal education programs Advising international agencies on educational programs  INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT  Capacity-building of NGOs Conducting training needs’ assessments Designing training materials for NGOs   GRASSROOTS INITIATIVES: PROJECT DESIGN   Designing learning and earning schemes for youth in the informal sectorGender-based empowerment Organizing and training income-generating projects for women and men Designing non-formal learning projects for working childrenConsulting on educational solutions for working childrenOrganizing communities to design, produce and market traditional crafts CSR ADVISORY SERVICES  Our community development team is uniquely qualified to provide Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Advisory Services. We combine extensive hands-on experience with networks in the private, public and civil society organizations to offer our clients insights on sustainability. Our portfolio reflects solutions that have become deeply engrained and that have improved life for communities and institutions across MENA.
  • Rokaya Farouk Abdel Sattar, 50 yrs, is the first woman to run for mayor in the delta region and also the second woman to run for the post of mayor in Egypt. “For the first time in its history due to administrative changes, El Sorsok village will have a mayor” says Rokaya who has the support of her family and most members of her community".Other than being the only female running for the post of mayor in her village, however due to both her professional and social initiatives in her village, she is also among the most competent candidates for the post. Rokaya had worked as a quality control engineer in a public sector company for twenty eight years.After her early retirement she has dedicated herself to her community through forming the ‘Omar el Farouk’ association which cares for orphans, and offers aid for households headed by women, as well as organizing cultural and religious activities, and offering literacy classes.Rokaya has the support of her family and most members of her village, as she is a very well respected and an active social figure in her community, “of course some people do not think it is appropriate for a woman to run for a post that is traditionally taken by men” she comments, however this did not discourage her from pursuing her dream.Rokaya says she has dreams that she will work to achieve whether or not she succeeds in becoming the village’s mayor. The most important things she wants to do is to build a medical center as there are no health facilities in the whole village, as well as forming a post office, and building a charity organization on a piece of land she owns in the village.Joern Neumann 
  • Who is HodaBadran?HodaBadran is the Chairperson of the Alliance for Arab Women (AAW), a voluntary organization headquartered in Cairo. AAW works with a network of over 350 NGOs on issues of Arab women's human rights, legal literacy for women leaders, implementation of the Beijing Platform of Action, women's political participation, and supporting education for impoverished children. AAW provides training workshops, conducts research, and prepares reports on women's rights. Ms. Badran is Representative of NGOs for the meeting of the Summit of Arab Women El Manama, El Bahrain, and a member of the National Council for Women (Egypt). She served as First President for the Center of Human Rights, United Nations, member of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) from 1991-1995, and served as Egypt's representative to the UNICEF International Board. HodaBadran's AwardsMs. Badran was also Professor of Social Research and Community Participation at the University of Helwan in Cairo, Egypt. HodaBadran was awarded the UNESCO Award for distinguished women in 1995, the Emirates Women Union Award for Leadership in Women's Activities in 1994, and the Distinguished UN Representative Award from the government of Sri Lanka in 1982. References: http://www.learningpartnership.org
  • Tahani El-Gebali:No winding pathways for Egypt's first woman judge A question of judgementProfile by AminaElbendaryLanding on the third floor of a nondescript apartment building in Garden City it is not difficult to guess which is Tahani El-Gebali's home; it must be the one behind the door plastered with Palestinian paper flags, symbols of the solidarity movement. There are more of them inside as well. El-Gebali is a long time activist. And now she has just entered history from a wider gate, as Egypt's first woman judge. She is the first judge I have met face to face, and the initial impression is of someone surprisingly unassuming. You let your guard down, though you do so consciously, much in the way you might with a school teacher met years after leaving school: it remains impossible to forget that in this relationship she has the authority. And she is adept at presenting herself -- the legacy of a life of public debate and legal performance. In times of trouble, though, one feels confident that she will be there. People who have dealt with her, professionally and as an activist over the years, make the same remark: Tahani is gada'a; she stands her ground on the tough issues. Throughout her working life El-Gebali has been "El- UstazaTahani." For some she is "TanteTahani", loved, respected and perhaps even slightly feared. Whatever the role, she is clearly the matriarch. But how will she carry the new title, Siyadat Al-Mustashara? She will, no doubt, redefine that title and that role as she has redefined others. No problem. She is not worried, though perhaps a little anxious; she knows her life will not be the same sitting behind the bench before which she stood for much of her adult life. She knows she will have to give up some things, her membership in a dozen or so civic institutions, including the Lawyers' Syndicate. "But I just couldn't for a minute contemplate not taking the job on the Supreme Constitutional Court [SCC]," she says. Nominated by the Supreme Judicial Council (SJC), her appointment was endorsed by President Mubarak on 23 January. "It is the surprise of a lifetime. I could never have dreamt of anything more glorious." Tahani was born in 1950, in Tanta, capital of Al-Gharbiya province. Her father worked as a public health inspector with the Red Cross, her mother taught Arabic language and religious studies and eventually became headmistress and a deputy minister of education. She was a formidable woman, her mother: she went to school in the 1930s, one of the earliest generations of women to receive a formal education. It was unusual for women of her mother's generation to seek employment outside the house, particularly in the provinces. But her mother did. When her husband died, leaving seven children, Tahani's mother continued working, finding time for public works as well. During the 1956 War she volunteered for the National Guard. Her father's family were landowners, adversely affected by the land redistribution laws passed under the revolutionary regime. Yet this, and the family's traditional Wafdist affiliation, didn't inhibit Tahani El-Gebali's support for the ideals of the 23 July Revolution. Until her appointment to the SCC she remained a member of the Nasserist Party although, she explains, she had frozen her membership several years ago due to differences with party leadership. "But I remain committed to the ideals of 23 July." Now that she is a judge El-Gebali has, as required, suspended all political activity. But this, she points out, does not stop her from being concerned with the fate of the nation, from having an opinion and voicing it on, for example, the pages of newspapers. Nevertheless, her long association with "the opposition" raised eye brows following the news of her SCC appointment. That, however, is testimony to the way in which she crosses such restrictive boundaries as political affiliation. When I timidly relate some of the objections of her detractors, those who are not quite enthusiastic about the idea of women judges, and who claim that even if it works in Cairo it will never be accepted in the provinces, she brushes away the criticism like she would crumbs from the dinner table. "These people don't know what they're talking about," she says emphatically. "There are many capable women lawyers working, not just in any province, but in Upper Egypt, people like Abla El-Hawwari in Sohag, for example. There are women whom the state appoints to handle reconciliation in crimes of revenge. So if they're accepted by the community to handle such sensitive cases, there is no reason they won't be accepted as judges. Society is not sufficiently in touch with its own realities," she patiently explains. Tahani first heard of the news that the SJC was discussing a motion to appoint her to the SCC through Mona Zulfiqar, a friend, fellow lawyer activist and someone "quite capable of serving as judge herself". Later Counselor FathiNaguib, president of the SCC, requested a meeting with El-Gebali and informed her of the decision. Acceptance, she knows, "will only come by women proving themselves". "Everything new is at first resented. When women first went out to learn, people said it was the end of time, when they went out to work they said it would be the end of the world. But it wasn't. And women have proven themselves in all fields." Not everyone within the legal establishment is quite as welcoming of the idea, though. The issue has been debated for decades, since Aisha Rateb was barred from the State Council in 1949. It is a debate that gained momentum in the 1990s -- as an activist lawyer El-Gebali was involved in the campaign for women judges. And as she is herself aware, the final decision was heatedly debated within the SCC for two months before it was endorsed. "There are many within the legal field who welcome women judges and feel that Egypt has been lagging behind other Arab and Islamic countries in this domain. Others are reserved, fearing for the judiciary and its aura. The judiciary, by its very nature in any society, is a conservative institution that doesn't handle new things easily. But this doesn't mean that proving oneself isn't in the end met with respect. We faced the same experience when women first practiced law, it was difficult to accept a successful woman lawyer and have judges listen seriously and respectfully to her defence. That was temporary, until we had well-established women lawyers. And it will be the same with judges. There are many women who can serve as judges. I expect women judges will be appointed to the proposed Family Court. And I expect that women will soon be allowed into the State Prosecutor's Bureau as well. Do you know that over 51 per cent of legal academics in Egypt are women? These women teach the men who become judges: how can anyone claim that they are less qualified than their students? Most of today's judges were taught by professors like Fawziya Abdel-Sattar and Samiha El-Qalyoubi. There are many women who work as legal arbitrators in commercial cases involving billions of dollars. Surely lawyers who can handle such complex cases can act as judges on commercial cases." Others argue with the jurisprudence that allows for women judges. And, again, El-Gebali is quick with fiqhi refutations (she has a diploma in Islamic Shari'a as well, something that has been useful against conservative religious opponents in her battles for civil liberties). "Today's judge is an institution, not an individual. He or she doesn't rule alone but is supported by institutions. A judge is no longer both faqih (jurist) and qadi (judge). He no longer carries out fiqh (jurisprudence), but issues rulings based on codified laws. A judge's role today is separated from an academic's. And there are precedents of women judges when the qadi was also a faqih; the Caliph Omar Ibn Al-Khattab appointed a woman, Shifaa, as qadihisba in the market. Shifaa used to issue fatwas in religious matters as well... If it was religiously permissible in Omar's times, how could it not be now, when the role of a judge itself has altered?" For El-Gebali the fact that the decision to appoint a woman judge came from the SCC, the highest court, suggests a determination to redress some of the injustices that kept women out of the judiciary. It may seem a long road from Tanta to Maadi, where the neo-Pharaonic building that houses the SCC stands facing the Nile, but for Tahani the route seems perfectly natural. She grew up in a family atmosphere that treasured and encouraged patriotic sentiments. "That's where I learned the concept of citizenship, not tolerance but thinking of others as equal citizens. Our neighbourhood in Tanta is predominantly Coptic. When my mother became headmistress she decided to make the students attend both Muslim and Christian religious classes instead of the segregation that is commonly practiced. She wanted all students to respect the other religion. Every Ramadan we used to invite all our Christian neighbours for iftar and my mother often fasted with them during the Virgin's Fast. When the Mar Girguis Cathedral was inaugurated, Pope Kirolos VI came to Tanta and all of us -- boys, girls, Copts, Muslims -- we were all excited and went out to greet him." Their house, too, was a scene for interfaith interaction. Tahani's father was friends with both Sheikh Mustafa Ismail, the celebrated Qur'anicreciter, and AnbaYouannas, bishop for scientific research. "Sheikh Mustafa would play the oud, AnbaYouannas the nay and my father would sing. He had a beautiful voice." Clearly her family served as the wind beneath her wings. When Tahani graduated from high school, with high scores, she chose to study law and not a subject with more cache. Among her father's relatives was Mustafa El-Baradie, one- time president of the Lawyers Syndicate. "He was glorified within the family and greatly respected by all. He was a role model. I first felt the importance of lawyers through the family's respect of Mustafa El- Baradie. To be a lawyer was always my dream." Given her illustrious career -- she was the first woman elected to the board of the Syndicate in 1989 and to the permanent board of the Union of Arab Lawyers -- it would have been a logical step had Tahani succeeded Mustafa El- Baradie as president of the Bar. But fate had it otherwise. The current president, SamehAshour, is a lifetime friend. Law was an unusual choice for a woman to begin with and there were no law schools in Tanta in the late 1960s, so she joined Cairo University. "The first year of university I lived in the women's dorms. My father was shocked at the rules and regulations that were in place there. He thought it sounded like a military prison not a dormitory. He wanted me to go out in the world and enjoy the experience of university to the maximum. He met the president of the university to object against the stifling rules and even signed a letter giving me freedom to come and go as I wished regardless of the hours of the dorms. But the following years I lived on my own. My parents were trusting and respecting of me." She joined the Faculty of Law in the fall of 1968, turbulent times for the nation. Campuses were rife with student activism following the June 1967 defeat. She joined in, and since then her name has been associated with many causes, not least the Palestinian solidarity and women's rights movements. Following her graduation from Cairo University in 1973 Tahani El-Gebali has worked in commercial, civic, criminal and family law. She has defended many civil liberty and freedom of opinion and expression cases, most notably the case of the bread riots in January 1977, the case against ThawratMisr activists in which the main defendant was Khaled Abdel-Nasser, and the case against Nasr Hamed Abu-Zeid, to name but a few. In the 1970s and 80s she was heavily involved in defending striking workers. "I was often on the defence teams of such cases, being close to Mahalla, an industrial centre. Strikes, by factory and railway workers, made me aware of the importance of social balance. Such workers have always set examples of discipline as a group, and their protests were always for group benefits. I felt that there was a need to organise this right. I was very glad when in the case of the railway workers in the 1980s the court stated in its ruling that the right to strike is a legitimate right that has to be regulated by law. Nowadays, the new labour law that is being discussed is moving in the direction of regulating this right. I view such developments differently than other people because I lived through the experience of defending workers in court whose only crime was that they went on strike. And now there will be a clause that tells them they have a right to strike but according to a certain order." Similarly, for El-Gebali women's rights aren't some abstract, fashionable notion. She recalls in detail the number of cases she has handled in which women were unjustly treated and where the law did not always stand by them -- women who spent 12, even 15 years in court trying to get a divorce ruling on the basis of harm, walking into court in their twenties, walking out in their late forties. "One of my clients, a woman, was refused permission by her husband to travel to London to visit her dying father who was injured in a fire. I spent 21 days trying to get a court ruling to allow her to travel, but the law was not on our side. And the man passed away. I failed to get her a court order to allow her to attend the funeral. I had to personally interfere with the husband, plead with him, until he agreed to travel with his wife to attend her father's funeral." When people talk about a woman's right to freedom of movement, to travel without her husband's approval, El- Gebali knows what is at stake. "I defended a cancer patient whose husband refused to allow to travel abroad for treatment," she remembers. Working on personal status cases made El-Gebali aware of the gap between the rights ordained according to Islamic Shari'a and the ways in which the law functions. No one should be forced to live with someone against their consent; consent is a precondition for accepting certain arrangements, for their continuity and for their termination, she explains. She welcomes recent legal amendments to the personal status law, including the Khul' clauses, inasmuch as they ensure the safety of society and human beings from the abuse of rights. Not all her cases have been success stories. "The court delegated me once to represent a woman accused of killing her husband. She was 72 years old and at first I was surprised that she might have committed such a crime. Then I came to understand that at her age she was vulnerable to her husband taking another wife. She was in a very difficult emotional and social position. She had no one to support her, she couldn't work, she was old and her health frail. Unfortunately, she died before the ruling. I fell sick afterwards and stayed at home for two weeks. Since then I've been urging for a social fund financed by the state, to take care of women divorced in old age because they have no means of support and need special care; they need the social care that a husband normally provides." There are many cases she is proud of. The young soldier, Ayman Hassan, who was involved in a shooting incident against Israelis in Rafah is one. "I was part of the defence team and was assigned what I believe was the most difficult part of the case. But, you know, he got 12 years in the end. And that was a victory, because he faced the death sentence on four different counts. We met recently and he told me 'I kept remembering your words during those 12 years: as long as your head is still on your shoulders, that's as good as an acquittal.'" She hopes that her appointment to the SCC will provide opportunities to review Egyptian laws and perhaps weed out persistent elements of gender discrimination. "There are still laws that are tarnished with unconstitutionality because of gender discrimination -- the citizenship law and some criminal laws, for example. I hope I can do something to redress these injustices," she says. "As a lawyer I have often appealed to the SCC. In fact, I still have a couple of cases that haven't been ruled on. I will have to step down from the bench when they come up for discussion." Even though she's been living in Cairo since she went to college, the Tanta connection remains. It is there in the bric-a-brac that occupy every inch of space in her colourful living room, in the blue ceramic ornaments that crowd a wall of the room ("No, I'm not afraid of the evil eye"). Tahani El-Gebali is not married and does not have children of her own but she is very much a family woman. "I am a mother by choice. I brought up four children, you know." Four of her nephews and nieces came by different circumstances to live with TanteTahani at different points in their lives. El-Gebali takes issue with traditional nuclear definitions of family. And she doesn't give any weight to the notion that had she had a traditional family of her own -- husband, kids and all the trappings -- she might not have achieved all she has: "Women do it all the time. I saw the experience of my mother. Besides," she says smilingly, "I do have a family and responsibilities. And I am responsible for children, for a kitchen and house work and all that." No big deal.

Women & social peace in egypt oct 23 final Women & social peace in egypt oct 23 final Presentation Transcript

  • WOMEN PROMOTING SOCIAL PEACE IN EGYPT –SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GENERATIONS…AG Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD, PHF+15Rotary Club of El Tahrir – D 2450 EgyptEngineering Consultants Group – ECG - Egypt
  • PRESENTATION HIGHLIGHTSThe concept of Social Peace Status of Women in Egypt Rotary Areas of Focus Women & Social Peace - CommunityDevelopment Women That are making a difference Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • SOCIAL PEACEPEACE May be defined asabsence of negative aspects likeviolence and the attendance ofpositive ones like calm, stability,health, growth, etc, so that we canachieve SOCIAL PEACE … Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • SOCIAL CONTRACTS Direct social contract Indirect social contract Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • STATUS OF WOMEN IN EGYPTA report by the Information and Decision SupportCenter of the Egyptian cabinet suggests that thestatus of women in society has improved in somefields, with 40 percent of senior administrative postsin the government filled with women. The number ofwomen registered to vote has also increasedsignificantly over the last 22 years. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • ROTARY AREAS OF FOCUS Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • EGYPTIAN FEMINIST HUDÁ SHAARĀWĪ(1879-1947) ; Hudá Shaarāwī (1879- 1947), a feminist nationalist activist, is considered by several Western scholars to be a central figure in early twentieth century Egyptian feminism. Born into a very wealthy family, Shaarawi spent her early years in the harem, an experience described in her memoirs, Harem Years.Hoda Shaarawi 1925 Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • EGYPTIAN FEMINIST HUDÁ SHAARĀWĪ (1879-1947) Hudá Shaarāwī and friends at her villaFrom top: Hudá Shaarāwīand Ceza Nabarawi, twoof the historical leaders ofthe Egyptian feministmovement; the cover ofthe 28 May 1923 issue ofAl-Lataif Al-Musawwara Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD(Al-Ahram Archives) Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • MS NAELA ALLOUBA: (1928 - TO DATE)THE LADY OF BOTH WORLDS Naela Allouba hanem inside the home of the leading femenist, Hoda Shaarawi hanem. The ladies had just returned from offering their respects and greetings to Their Majesty, the King and Queen of Egypt, at Abdin Palace (1947) Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • LOTFEYA MOHAMED NAMEC (1914 – 1998) AL NOUR WAL AMAL (LIGHT & HOPE) ASSOCIATIONShe served in the Egyptian RedCrescent and on the 1st of October1954 she founded with a group ofvolunteers working at the RedCrescent Al Nour Wa Al AmalAssociation for the welfare of theblind headed by Mrs. Istiklal Radi,as the first president Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • LOTFEYA MOHAMED NAMEC (1914 – 1998)AL NOUR WAL AMAL (LIGHT & HOPE) ASSOCIATIONIn 2012 … 58 years Later …. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • CHAHDANE NAFEH (1945 – TO DATE) PARENTS & SONS ASSOCIATIONShe serves on several NGOsspecially and Parents and Sonswhere she leads the Fundraisingand awareness activities . TheNGO that aims to integratechildren with special needs in thesociety, particularly children withmental challenges like downsyndrome and autism. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • GEHANE HALAWA (1945 – TO DATE) EGYPTIAN SOCIETY FOR VILLAGE DEVELOPMENT• Member of Parliament ( Previously )• Owner & Chairman of MS• Chairman of Egyptian Society ofVillage Development Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • FATMA BARRADA (1945 – TO DATE) HOPE VILLAGE FOR STREET CHILFRENChairman of Hope Village forstreet children, Member in Huda Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhDShaarawi association Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • GHADA TOSSON & FAWZWYA ELSENOUSY MOTHER & DAUGHTER LEGACYVision for Environmental andTraining Consultancy Services(VEATCS)- Beni-SweifNevine Abdelkhalek, ECG Rotary El Tahrir – PhD RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • MALAAK ZAALOUKEDUCATION REFORM Making it work If children wont go to school -- well, the schools will just have to go to them. Dr Zaalouk is the woman who believes in revolution, and then helps bring it about Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • YASMIN HELALEDUCATE-MEIn 2010, Yasmin’s senseof Social Responsibilityand Entrepreneurial spiritpushed her to start up asmall initiative namedEducate-Me to helpfinancially underprivilegedchildren go to School. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • DR. OLA RAGABMEDICAL CARE ACROSS EGYPT Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • MONA RAGABPRESERVING NUBIAN CULTURE Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • FATEMA KHAFAGYPOLITICAL AND A FEMINIST ACTIVIST She is a board member of the Alliance for Arab Women who with other 15 feminist NGOs in Egypt She is also the coordinator of the Egyptian/Tunisian committee on Arab revolutions and gender equality. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • LAILA ISKANDAR KAMEL INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT PROTECTIONDr. Kamel is an Education andDevelopment Specialist who offers acompelling combination of in-depthknowledge and internationalexposure as a result of providing Chairperson ofconsultancy services for UNESCO, CID ConsultingUSAID, UNDP and many others. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • ROKAYA FAROUK ABDEL SATTARFIRST WOMAN MAYORis the first woman to run for mayor in the deltaregion and also the second woman to run for thepost of mayor in Egypt. “For the first time in itshistory due to administrative changes, El Sorsokvillage will have a mayor” says Rokaya who hasthe support of her family and most members ofher community".. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • HODA BADRAN THE ALLIANCE FOR ARAB WOMEN (AAW),the Chairperson of the Alliance for ArabWomen (AAW), a voluntary organizationheadquartered in Cairo. AAW works with anetwork of over 350 NGOs on issues ofArab womens human rights, legal literacyfor women leaders, implementation of theBeijing Platform of Action, womens politicalparticipation, and supporting education forimpoverished children. Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • TAHANY EL GEBALY1ST FEMALE JUDGE El-Gebali is a long time activist. And now she has just entered history from a wider gate, as Egypts first woman judge in 2003 Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • MAGGIE GOBRANSELFLESS DEDICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT Mama-Maggie Gobran nominated for NOBEL PRIZE For PEACE 2012 Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • What am Itrying to do Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • NEVINE ABDELKHALEK VOCATIONAL SERVICE• Eliminating the sources of illiteracy• School to work• University to work• Integrating CSR in day to day companyactivities for sustainable development• supporting Free Engineering Services forCancer Hospitals & Street Children rehabilitationcenters Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • ROTARY AREAS OF FOCUS Peace and conflict prevention/resolution Disease prevention and treatment Water and sanitation Maternal and child health Basic education and literacy Economic and community development Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • For Mercy has a Human Heart, Pity a Human Face, And Love, the Human Form Divine, And Peace, the Human Dress.---- William Blake: "The Divine Image" Songs of Innocence Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012
  • Nevine abdelkhalekNevine.abdelkhalek@gmail.com Nevine Abdelkhalek, PhD Rotary El Tahrir – ECG RI UN Day Nov. 3 2012