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Microshield Mold Remediation Presentation, John Lapotaire, CIEC
 

Microshield Mold Remediation Presentation, John Lapotaire, CIEC

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Microshield's primary response to fungal contamination in buildings is the prompt Remediation of contaminated material and infrastructure repair while preventing further damage to the structure, ...

Microshield's primary response to fungal contamination in buildings is the prompt Remediation of contaminated material and infrastructure repair while preventing further damage to the structure, personal belongings, and occupants.

In accordance with the ANSI Approved IICRC S-520 Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Mold Remediation.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
www.Microshield-ES.com

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    Microshield Mold Remediation Presentation, John Lapotaire, CIEC Microshield Mold Remediation Presentation, John Lapotaire, CIEC Presentation Transcript

    • Mold Remediation
      In accordance with the
      ANSI Approved IICRC S-520
      Helping You put the
      Pieces Back Together
      Lydia A. Lapotaire, CIEC
      John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
    • Before We Begin
      Please Silence
      Your Cell Phones
    • 1
      8
      Microshield Remediation Goals
      Chemical Usage
      2
      7
      3
      6
      4
      5
      Mold Remediation Protocol
      The Players
      Post Remediation Verification Inspection
      The IICRC S-520
      Personal Protective Equipment
      Microbial Cleaning
    • Microshield Remediation Goals
      Microshield’s primary response to fungal contamination in buildings is
      the prompt Remediation of contaminated material
      and infrastructure repair.
      while preventing further damage to the structure, personal belongings, and occupants.
      In accordance with the ANSI Approved IICRC S-520 Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Mold Remediation.
    • Remediation Protocol
      Mold Remediation Protocol
    • The Goal of Mold Remediation
      The Goal of Mold Remediation is
      to remove or clean contaminated materials in a way that prevents
      the emission of bacteria, fungi, and dust contaminated with bacteria and fungi
      from leaving a work area and entering an occupied or non-restoration area,
      while protecting the health of workers performing the restoration.
      To accomplish this a State Licensed Mold Remediation Contractor will require a Mold Remediation Protocol.
    • What is a Mold Remediation Protocol?
      A Remediation Protocol outlines the needed actions for any necessary mold remediation.
      Each plan is individually prepared based on the Indoor Environmental Consultants Mold Assessment of the property the size and area of the mold contamination.
    • Mold Remediation Protocol
      A properly prepared Mold Remediation Protocol should be written according to the ANSI Approved IICRC S-520 standard and reference guide for the remediation of mold damaged structures and contents.
    • Mold Remediation Protocol
      The Remediation Protocol will specify the
      remediation containment strategy,
      decontamination areas,
      negative air pressure and air filtration
      equipment utilization,
      personnel protective equipment,
      specific cleaning protocols,
      project completion requirements,
      site-specific safety plan and
      clearance testing that will confirm the post remediation goals have been met.
    • The Players
      The Players
    • The Players
      The Licensed Assessor
      The Licensed Contractor
      Law Enforcement
      The Un-Licensed Contractor
    • The Players
      Once the Mold Remediation Protocol, specifying the proper procedures, guidelines, and activities related to the removal of microbial compromised building materials and subsequent cleanup activities has been established
      The Mold Remediation Protocol can then be utilized to obtain written bids on the cost to carry out the protocol specifications from several qualified and Licensed mold remediation contractors.
    • The Players
      In a perfect world you could trust everyone, but it's not a perfect world.
      Like every industry, the mold business has its share of scammers and con men seeking to profit from your lack of knowledge about mold.
    • The Players
      If you hire a mold remediator to inspect for mold he will always find plenty of mod to remediate.
      Remember that it’s a serious conflict of interest for the mold inspection company you hire to "inspect" for mold and also profit from the "removal" of mold as your mold remediator.
    • The Players
      Mold inspectors should never profit from what they find.
      The best way to avoid this mold scam is to hire a Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant who is not in the remediation business to conduct a Mold Assessment and write a specific Mold Remediation Protocol for Your home or office.
      And Always ensure that your Mold Assessor is Licensed by the State
      That's the only way to ensure an unbiased Mold Inspection.
    • Post Remediation Verification
      Post Remediation Verification
    • Post Remediation Verification
      The final step in the mold removal process is a Post Remediation Verification Inspection or Mold Clearance Test
      conducted to verify and document that the remediation was in fact successful.
      The Post Remediation Verification Test or Mold Clearance Test should also be conducted according to the ANSI Approved IICRC S-520.
    • Post Remediation Verification
      The Post Remediation Verification Inspection or Mold Clearance Test should be done before any re-construction work begins so the inspector can visually see that there is no mold left on the remediated materials.
    • Post Remediation Verification
      Many mold remediation contractors offer "FREE" post remediation verification inspection or mold clearance testing.
      Mold Clearance Testing is vital to the mold remediation process and should never be conducted by the remediation contractor.
    • Post Remediation Verification
      Insurance companies, mortgage lenders and prospective buyers of your property in the future will want to see written confirmation that the mold issue was resolved.
      Post Remediation Verification Inspection PRVI or Clearance Testing should never be performed by a mold removal contractor waiting to get paid for his work.
      With thousands of dollars on the line, it is highly unlikely that a contractor will fail his own work.
    • Post Remediation Verification
      Remember to always have your PRVI Post Remediation Verification Inspection Clearance Test performed by a Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant who does not work for your remediation contractor.
      This will ensure you have a Healthy Home.
    • The IICRC S-520
      The IICRC S-520
    • The S-520
      The S-520 2nd Edition is the Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Mold Remediation is a procedural standard and reference guide for the remediation of mold damaged structures and contents. 
      The S-520 is based on reliable remediation and restoration principles, research and practical experience, and attempts to combine essential academic principles with practical elements of water damage restoration for technicians facing "real-life" mold remediation challenges.
    • The S-520
      The S520 provides a philosophical shift away from setting numerical mold contamination action levels.
      Instead, it establishes
      mold contamination definitions,
      descriptions and Conditions (1, 2, 3), and
      general guidance, which, when properly applied,
      can assist remediators and others in determining criteria that trigger remediation activities or
      confirm remediation success.
    • The S-520
      Cond 1
      Cond 2
      Cond 3
      S-520
    • Condition 1
      Condition 1 (normal ecology) – may have settled spores, fungal fragments or traces of actual growth whose identity, location and quantity is reflective of a normal fungal ecology for an indoor environment.
    • Condition 2
      Condition 2 (settled spores) – an indoor environment which is primarily contaminated with settled spores that were dispersed directly or indirectly from a Condition 3 area, and which may have traces of actual growth.
    • Condition 3
      Condition 3 (actual growth) – an indoor environment contaminated with the presence of actual growth and associated spores. Actual growth includes growth that is active or dormant, visible or hidden.
    • The S-520
      This ANSI Approved S-520 was written for use by those involved in the mold remediation industry, primarily for mold remediation companies and workers, and secondarily, for others who investigate or assess mold complaints, prepare remediation specifications, protocols or procedures, and manage remediation projects,
    • Worker Instruction
      Before the project begins, Remediator shall instruct workers on using appropriate procedures for personal protection when performing remedial and cleaning techniques including:
      Use and fitting of respirators
      Use of protective clothing
      Entry and exit from work areas
      Aspects of work procedures
      Protective measures
      Safety and emergency egress procedures
    • Respiratory Protection
      Remediator shall provide workers with individually issued and marked respiratory protection equipment approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).
    • Respiratory Protection
      At a minimum, respiratory protection for remediation workers working within full containments shall consist of full-face negative pressure P100 respirators.
      Full-faced powered air purifying (PAPR) respirators shall be used in crawlspace containments.
    • Respiratory Protection
      These respirators shall be equipped with a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter and organic vapor cartridge/cartridges. Remediator shall provide sufficient replacement respirators or cartridges for negative pressure respirators and PAPRs as necessary or as required by applicable regulations.
    • Respiratory Protection
      Cartridges and filters for respirators shall not be used any longer than one workday.
      New respirator cartridges and respirators shall be stored at the job site in a clean storage cabinet.
      Disposable respirators must be discarded after every worker moves to a different work area according to the direction of the Environmental Consultant.
    • Respiratory Protection
      Remediator shall ensure that workers do not remove respirators to eat, drink, smoke, chew gum or tobacco, or apply cosmetics during mold remediation work activities.
    • Protective Clothing
      Remediator shall provide workers with sufficient sets of protective disposable clothing, consisting of full-body coveralls, head covers, gloves, and boot covers in sizes to properly fit individual workers.
      Integral boot/head cover/coveralls are acceptable so long as the shoe covering fits well and does not cause a trip hazard.
    • Protective Clothing
      All persons entering containments under Remediation Level 3 shall wear disposable clothing over street clothes or undergarments before entering the work area.
      Protective clothing shall be secured at the wrists (for example, taped) to ensure that skin is not exposed.
    • Protective Clothing
      Skin protection is essential to prevent contact with spores that may be present on microbial-contaminated materials.
      Removal, cutting, rolling up, or alteration of the full-length arm and leg portions of the coveralls is strictly prohibited, as is the removal of the integral head covering.
      Remediator shall provide hard hats, as required by job conditions or by applicable safety regulations.
    • Protective Clothing
      Only the Environmental Consultant and the Owner/Engineer and remediation workers possessing the appropriate licensing, certification, and training may enter the remediation containment areas.
      Remediator shall not under any circumstances permit any person to enter the containment areas without the appropriate protective clothing, respirators, equipment, certification, and training.
      This includes the property owners for their protection.
    • Safety Compliance Signage
      Remediator shall comply with all local fire safety rules regarding egress from buildings.
      WARNING SIGNS Remediator shall post warning signs (at all entrances or openings to containments.
      Warning signs must contain characters of such size, clearly marked, in English (at a minimum), and in any other language necessary (e.g., Spanish) such that comprehension by all passers-by is ensured.
    • Safety Compliance Signage
    • Safety Compliance Signage
      Warning signs shall state the following:
      WARNING
      DO NOT ENTER
      Remediation and/or
      Cleaning Work in Progress
      Alternate wording for thewarning signs must be approved in advance by the Environmental Consultant.
    • Safety Compliance Signage
    • Authorized Visitors
      Visitors who enter the containment areas must have full authorization from the Owner/Engineer and the Environmental Consultant.
      Additionally, all visitors must have the following certifications:
      Current (within 12 months) physician's approval to enter work areas where fungal aerosols are being generated, including the ability to wear a negatively pressurized respirator
    • Authorized Visitors
      If the physician's written approval to enter work areas where fungal aerosols are being generated is not feasible to obtain, it is the Remediator's responsibility to effectively communicate to all authorized visitors the hazards and risks associated with occupational exposure to fungal aerosols.
      Risks can include allergic respiratory disease (for example, asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis), infection for individuals with pre-existing chronic disease (for example, those with compromised immune systems), and mycotoxicosis (mycotoxins can cause adverse health effects).
    • Authorized Visitors
      No substitution may be made for the physical examination and other requirements as specified under the Respiratory Protection Standard (OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134).
      Current (within six months) respirator fit test documentation.
      Release form to the Owner/Engineer stating knowledge by the visitor of the potential hazards involved in entering the containment areas.
    • Authorized Visitors
      Remediator shall instruct all visitors in safety and proper use of protective clothing and respiratory protection before the visitor shall enter the work area.
      Refer to applicable sections of these specifications.
    • Authorized Visitors
    • Authorized Visitors
    • Containment
      General
      Two containment barriers are necessary for full containments, which may include a ceiling constructed of the same material (6-mil flame retardant polyethylene sheeting) used for containment walls.
      The first containment barrier is the barrier for the contained work area.
      The second containment barrier is the contained work area clean room.
    • Containment
      Supports such as wooden 2 x 4's, PVC pipes, Zip Walls, or other framing materials shall be used to support the ceilings of full containments including clean rooms.
      These support frames may be constructed in such a way that they are transportable / reusable between work areas.
    • Containment
      6-mil flame retardant polyethylene sheeting shall be secured to existing structures using duct tape (2-inch minimum width), spray adhesives, staples or any other combination thereof to insure the integrity of the barrier for the duration of the work.
      Additional supports in the form of plywood panels (to be used in occupied areas), 2 x 3 or 4-inch wood studs, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) piping, or other equivalent framing material shall be used as determined by Remediator and approved by the Environmental Consultant.
    • Containment
      Full Containment Protective Barriers
      Two layers of 6-mil flame retardant polyethylene sheeting on all openings, including the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system openings.
      Floors and stationary non-colonized objects in the enclosed containment work area shall be covered by 2 layers (minimum) of polyethylene sheeting according to the professional judgment of the Environmental Consultant.
    • Containment
      The walls of the enclosed containment work area shall be covered by 1 layer (minimum) of polyethylene sheeting according to the professional judgment of the Environmental Consultant.
    • Containment
      Regulated Contaminated Areas PP&E
      (Personal Protective Equipment)
      Containment will be established and maintained as a regulated area that is restricted to authorized personnel only.
      No one will be allowed to enter without proper respirator, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and signed Visitor Form.
    • Containment
      Site Visit Requirements for Anyone entering the Remediation Containment
      48 hour notice to REMEDIATOR.
      Full PPE donned before entering containment. PPE includes protective suits with booties and hoods, rubber gloves, and a minimum of a half face respirator with dual cartridge organic vapor/acid gas/ P100 cartridges and goggles.
      All PPE will be provided by REMEDIATOR.
    • Containment
      Clean suits and rubber gloves are required each time entering the containment. Respirator cartridges are to be changed daily.
      Respirator fit testing verification must be supplied.
      Everyone is required to sign in and out each time they come on site.
      A waiver will also be required to be on file for every person that comes on site.
    • Containment
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      Remediator shall install and use ventilation equipment consisting of AFDs equipped with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and pre-filters, to develop and maintain a negative air pressure differential inside contained work areas relative to outside areas.
      Remediator shall be responsible for acquiring and paying for any licenses needed for use of any equipment, including but not limited to, air pressure differential systems and air filtration systems.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      All vacuum collection equipment, exhausted within the building envelope during the course of this remediation project shall utilize HEPA final filtration with a 99.97% collection efficiency at 0.3 microns.
      All HEPA filters must carry a manufacturer's label of DOP efficiency certification.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      All vacuum collection equipment exhausted within a building envelope must pass on site HEPA filtration efficiency certification DOP test that may be conducted by the Environmental Consultant prior to initial use on the job site.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      Additional filtration re-certifications are required whenever:
      A new HEPA final filter is installed in the vacuum collection device during the course of the project.
      A vacuum collection device has been visibly damaged to an extent, in the opinion of the Environmental Consultant, may have compromised the integrity of the HEPA final filter.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      A HEPA filtered air scrubber or other vacuum collection device is relocated from a highly contaminated work zone to one of lesser contamination.
      HEPA filters and pre-filters for AFDs shall be replaced to maintain pressurization performance requirements during demolition and cleaning, and at the completion of work in a containment work area.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      Filters shall not be reused. Used filters shall be double-bagged in 6-mil polyethylene bags within the containment and disposed as contaminated waste as specified in Section 6.0.
      All exhaust and intake openings in AFDs shall be sealed with one layer of 6-mil polyethylene when not in use, including transporting such AFDs into and out of the work areas during containment construction and containment removal work.
    • Air Filtration Devices (AFDs)
      All AFD equipment is subject to performance checks by the Environmental Consultant and if found deficient, must be repaired or replaced.
    • Containment Pressurization
      Remediator shall establish a negative air pressure differential inside the containment work areas relative to adjacent areas, before full containment removal work activities begin.
      No air from inside contained work areas may flow out of the containment work area without passing through a HEPA filter.
    • Containment Pressurization
      The exhaust ventilation system should be capable of maintaining a differential pressure of not less than -0.02 inches w.c. (inches in water column) or -5 pa (pascals) for full containment.
      An air pressure differential shall be continuously maintained in all containment work areas from the start of work until all remediation activities (including fine dust removal) has been completed.
    • Containment Pressurization
      If the containment work area isolation structure fails to prevent air from flowing out of the enclosed work areas during personnel or equipment movement through the containment structure, additional air locks and/or AFD(s) shall be installed.
      Remediator shall continuously monitor the air pressure differential across work area enclosures by using a pressure differential meter or manometer.
    • Containment Pressurization
      The monitoring system must be in place before the start of remedial activities and shall be visible (the gauge) from areas outside (external to the containment).
    • Negative Air
      All Access to the contained work area will be through the posted and marked access. There will be no access to the contained areas by any unauthorized personnel during the remediation.
      Anyone entering the contained work area must be in the proper personal protective equipment.
    • Negative Air
      The HEPA filtered exhaust ventilation system should be capable of maintaining a differential pressure of not less than -0.02 inches w.c. (inches in water column) or -5 pa (pascals) for full containment (Negative Air Pressure).
    • Negative Air
      The exhaust will be to the outside of the property through the windows or doors.
      An air pressure differential shall be continuously maintained (and monitored with a continuous manometer) in the containment work area from the start of work until all remediation activities (including fine dust removal) have been completed.
    • Exhaust Air Discharge
      All exhaust air from containment work areas, unless otherwise specified, shall be discharged to the outdoors, so as to prevent re-entrainment.
      Remediator shall coordinate the location of discharge openings with the Owner/Engineer and the Environmental Consultant.
    • Exhaust Air Discharge
      Any window sashes or doors removed for installation of exhaust air discharge equipment shall be reinstalled after completion of the work.
      Openings used for discharge of exhaust air shall be sealed tight with duct tape and plywood.
      Exhaust discharge openings may be cut into plywood.
      HEPA filters must be used on all air exhausted from containments.
    • Limiting Cross Contamination
      When working outside of negatively pressurized containments,
      Remediator shall keep exposed service tools and equipment free of debris and contamination.
    • Limiting Cross Contamination
      Tools and equipment include (but are not limited to):
      Vacuum Collection Equipment, hoses and attachments,
      air lines and hoses,
      brushes,
      ladders,
      power tools,
      hand tools,
      zoning devices, and
      inspection equipment
    • Limiting Cross Contamination
      Contaminated hand tools and equipment shall be kept sealed in plastic bags until cleaned in the designated outdoor decontamination area at the work site.
      Hoses, cables, and other tools shall be cleaned free of visible debris with suitable sanitary damp wipes prior to removal from containment areas.
    • Limiting Cross Contamination
      The Environmental Consultant may require ATP swab tests to verify the cleanliness of the Contractor's equipment prior to its initial deployment on site, and throughout the course of the project.
      The Environmental Consultant may direct Remediator to provide additional cleaning to any equipment that the Environmental Consultant deems as a potential source of cross contamination on the job site.
    • Contained Work Area Access
      Containment Entry Procedures
      For entry into the containment, the following entry procedure shall be used.
      Remediator shall ensure that each worker and authorized visitor follows these entry procedures:
    • Contained Work Area Access
      Wear respiratory protective equipment and protective clothing
      disposable protective clothing with integral full-body protection and
      headgear,
      gloves, and
      footwear as described in the protective clothing section of this protocol
      over street clothes or undergarments before entering the contained work area.
    • Contained Work Area Access
      Remediator shall provide protective clothing and appropriate respirators to authorized visitors.
      Protective clothing and respirators must be accessible to the Environmental Consultant for inspection of work areas after normal work hours.
      Pass through the clean room before entering into the contained or enclosed work area.
    • Contained Work Area Access
      Containment Exit Procedures
      Remediator shall ensure that each worker and authorized visitor follows these decontamination exit procedures:
      When an individual leaves the containment work area (e.g., for breaks, lunch, end of work shift),
      HEPA-vacuum the protective clothing before exiting the containment work area.
    • Contained Work Area Access
      HEPA-vacuum the inner walls, ceiling, and floor of the clean room.
      Remove protective clothing and deposit into a contaminated material disposal bag that is dedicated to the equipment room only, for the purpose of disposal of the outer protective clothing layer.
      Exit the clean room.
    • Contained Work Area Access
      Remediator shall have an extra HEPA vacuum available for use immediately outside the clean room in the event the vacuum serving the clean room fails.
      Upon exiting the containment, remove respirator.
    • HEPA Filtered Vacuum Cleaners
      Remediator shall provide an adequate quantity of HEPA-filtered vacuum cleaners (with DOP efficiency certification labels), designed for continuous operation, to perform the work in a timely and efficient manner.
      Nozzle attachments shall include those as required by Remediator to adequately remove all dust.
    • HEPA Filtered Vacuum Cleaners
      AT a minimum, nozzle attachments shall include crevice and extended bristle brush nozzles.
      All HEPA-filtered vacuum cleaners are subject to performance checks by the Environmental Consultant and if found deficient, must be repaired or replaced.
      All vacuum collection equipment, exhausted within the building envelope during the course of this remediation project shall utilize HEPA final filtration with 99.97% collection efficiency at 0.3 microns.
    • HEPA Filtered Vacuum Cleaners
      All HEPA filters must carry a manufacturer's label of DOP efficiency certification.
      All vacuum collection equipment exhausted within a building envelope must be capable of passing on site HEPA filtration efficiency certification DOP tests that the Environmental Consultant may conduct prior to initial use on the job site.
      Additional filtration re-certifications are required whenever:
    • HEPA Filtered Vacuum Cleaners
      A new HEPA final filter is installed in the vacuum collection device during the course of the project.
      A vacuum collection device has been visibly damaged to an extent, in the opinion of the Environmental Consultant, may have compromised the integrity of the HEPA final filter.
      A HEPA filtered air scrubber or other vacuum collection device is relocated from a highly contaminated work zone to one of lesser contamination.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Microbial Cleaning
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Initial Cleaning
      After removing all water damaged, bacterial infected, and or microbial contaminated building materials such as wood trim, drywall and insulation, allow the exposed studs and materials to fully dry.
      Use a High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuum to clean any dust, dirt or other small debris in exposed studs and crevices. Dispose of the vacuum filter in a well-sealed plastic bag.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Studs can be safely cleaned with a mild detergent solution.
      After cleaning, make sure the area is fully dried.
      Wear full personal protective equipment when cleaning all material within the contained work area.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      If there is visible mold on studs sand them down to physically remove the mold by sanding.
      Sanding down mold-contaminated surfaces is dangerous and should be performed by a trained professional who is certified to do mold and hazardous materials cleanups, and who is wearing appropriate protective gear (including a respirator that has been fit-tested).
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Dispose of all non-cleanable items that have visible mold.
      Non-cleanable items include, wallpaper, drywall, floor and ceiling tiles, insulation material, paper, and soft plastics.
      These items can hold spores and remain a source of mold growth for years, so they should be removed from the home immediately.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Final Clean:
      If the surface(s) being cleaned are dry, or mostly dry, lightly mist them with a mild detergent before cleaning the mold.
      If the mold is too dry, then the mold spores will have a much better chance of becoming airborne while being disturbed during the cleaning process.
      Once the surface is lightly misted (if necessary), thenclean the affected area(s) with a mild detergent to remove as much of the mold as possible.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      Thoroughly clean all surfaces in the area that contain visible mold, and even surfaces that do not have visible mold, since mold spores are microscopic very durable, and can remain dormant for months or even years.
      Once a surface has been cleaned and disinfected (if necessary), it should be completely dried.
    • Microbial Cleaning
      All surfaces (walls, windows, fixtures, floors, etc...) must then be HEPA vacuumed, hand wiped with a mild detergent solution followed by a 2nd HEPA vacuuming.
    • Debris Disposal:
      Debris will be double bagged, using 6mil bags, and disposed of by REMEDIATOR.
      The debris will be bagged in the first 6mil bag inside the contained work area and transported into the clean room.
      The bagged debris will then be should be HEPA vacuumed and wiped down and placed in the second 6mil bag prior to removing from the contained area.
    • Debris Disposal:
      When possible Do Not transport the bags through the building, especially other clean areas. Doing so will risk further spreading and re-germination of the mold. 
      When possible remove the bagged debris through a window or other opening accessible to the contained room/area being cleaned, when possible.
      These bags with the mold contaminated materials can be taken to any landfill. 
    • Personal Property
      Personal Property Documentation & Instructions
      Before the removal of contaminated materials begins, Remediator shall inspect for prior damage all items located in the remediation areas and give the Environmental Consultant and/or Owner/Engineer a written list including photographs if necessary, noting all such preexisting damaged items.
    • Personal Property
      All items that are very sentimental, valuable and sensitive to clean will need to be removed from the remediation area when possible AND prior to beginning the remediation and cleaned and handled by the owner/occupant.
    • Temporary Power and Light
      The Remediator shall provide temporary electrical power, equipped with grounded circuit interrupters, for Remediator’s equipment.
      The temporary power will be sufficient in number of outlets and circuit breakers in order to handle the amount of AFDs, lighting and other equipment that is required.
    • Temporary Power and Light
      Remediator shall be responsible for extending this power to his/her equipment, using grounded extension cords.
      Remediator will implement, if necessary, proper power lockout/tag-out procedures for any building equipment or other applicable power sources in the work areas.
      The necessity for such a power lock-out/tag-out procedure will be the sole responsibility of Remediator.
    • Temporary Power and Light
      Remediator shall provide sufficient stand-alone light fixtures to illuminate areas not adequately illuminated by existing lighting.
      This lighting must be available to the Environmental Consultant for after-hours work inspections.
    • Fire Protection
      Remediator shall provide portable fire extinguishers within the full containment areas, and outside the clean rooms.
      Fire extinguishers shall be rated for Class A, B, and C fire hazards and shall be sized for coverage of the areas within the containment.
    • Fire Protection
      Remediator shall consult with the local Fire Marshall, if Remediator is not familiar with or has questions pertaining to, selection, sizing, required number, and placement of the fire extinguishers.
      If fire sprinklers, smoke detectors, or fire detection equipment are present and operable, they must be protected during remediation.
    • *NOTE:
      *NOTE:
      Any deviations, alterations, changes, and/or additions to this protocol must be brought to the attention of the Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant prior to implementation.
      There will be no Ozone, Hydroxyls, or Anti-Microbial Fogging used during this mold remediation.
    • *NOTE:
      *NOTE:
      Any additional microbial growth, infestation, or material damage to the areas being remediated must be brought to the attention of the Microshield Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant.
      There will be no deviations, alterations, changes, and/or additions to this protocol without the written approval of the Microshield Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant prior to implementation.
    • *NOTE:
      *NOTE:
      This protocol is designed to return the Condition 3 areas to a measurable Condition 1.
      To accomplish this goal the protocol must be followed without unapproved alteration to the protocols scope of work.
    • Chemical Usage
      Chemical Usage
    • Chemical Usage
      Biocides, disinfectants, fungicides, anti-microbials, and encapsulants must not be used unless specified in this protocol.
      If chemical use is specified in this protocol the chemicals can only be applied in the specific areas identified in this protocol.
      If the remediator would like to apply chemicals in any way not specified in this protocol they must obtain written permission from the Microshield IEP.
    • Chemical Usage
      The ANSI approved IICRC S-520
      Source removal of mold contamination should always be the primary means of remediation.
      The Indiscriminant use of antimicrobial products, coatings, sealants, and cleaning chemicals is not recommended.
    • Chemical Usage
      New York City Department of Health
      The use of gaseous, vapor-phase, or aerosolized biocides for remedial purposes is not recommended.
      The use of biocides in this manner can pose health concerns for people in occupied spaces of the building and for people returning to the treated space if used improperly.
    • Chemical Usage
      American Industrial Hygiene Association
      The goal of remediation is removal of mold and the moisture source because:
      a) biocides do not alter mycotoxins or allergens;
      b) it is generally not possible to get 100 percent kill with biocides; and
      c) because the re-growth will occur with the newly deposited spores after if moisture returns.
    • Chemical Usage
      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
      The purpose of mold remediation is to remove the mold to prevent human exposure and damage to building materials and furnishings.
      It is necessary to clean up mold contamination, not just to kill the mold.
      Dead mold is still allergenic, and some dead molds are potentially toxic.
    • The Goal of Mold Remediation
      The Goal of Mold Remediation is
      to remove or clean contaminated materials in a way that prevents
      the emission of bacteria, fungi, and dust contaminated with bacteria and fungi
      from leaving a work area and entering an occupied or non-restoration area,
      while protecting the health of workers performing the restoration.
      To accomplish this a State Licensed Mold Remediation Contractor will require a Mold Remediation Protocol.
    • Microshield Remediation Goals
      Microshield’s primary response to fungal contamination in buildings is
      the prompt Remediation of contaminated material
      and infrastructure repair.
      while preventing further damage to the structure, personal belongings, and occupants.
      In accordance with the ANSI Approved IICRC S-520 Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Mold Remediation.
    • The Players
      The Licensed Assessor
      The Un-Licensed Contractor
      The Licensed Contractor
      Law Enforcement
    • The Players
      The Un-Licensed Contractor
      Law Enforcement
      The Client
    • Questions?
    • www.FloridaIAQ.com
      Thank You!
      John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
      Lydia A. Lapotaire, CIEC