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Aligning the Principles of
Permaculture Design with
Sustainable Open Access Practice
Open Access Un/Conference: Promote, I...
Handout:
http://goo.gl/T9bR29:
Twitter:
#PermOA and #OAW13
@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
Stacy Konkiel
https://twitter.com/skonkiel

Research interests include data information
literacy for graduate and undergra...
Overview
•
•
•
•
•

Why this topic now?
What is Permaculture?
The Scholarly Communication landscape
The 12 principles of P...
Why this topic now?
• Many years; effecting change; slowly
• Burnout, sure, but running through all our
efforts is a posit...
What is Permaculture?
An ecological design system for sustainability.

create community

build

grow & restore
@skonkiel; ...
Bill Mollison
Permaculture is a „Positivistic‟ response to
environmental crisis. It is about what we
want to do and can do...
The Scholarly Communication Landscape
Reality #1: We live in a capitalist society.
Big Ag

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; ...
The Scholarly Communication Landscape
Reality #2: Our current systems are based on the
assumption of unlimited resources.
...
The Scholarly Communication Landscape
Reality #3: New technologies and philosophies are
upending the dominance of traditio...
The 12 Permaculture
Principles & 3 Ethics

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
Observe & Interact (Holmgren)

Observe Continuously | Evolve | Adapt | Avoid Copying Gimmicks
@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermO...
Observe & Interact (Libraries)

Listen | Build Relationships | Observe | Design | Reply

Win:Win
@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #Pe...
Catch & Store Energy (Holmgren)

Collect at peak abundance;
build assets for future generations.

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #P...
Catch & Store Energy (Libraries)
We do this.
Question today: how to do this
cooperatively while serving
locally?

@skonkie...
Obtain a Yield (Holmgren)

Move from demanding
consumer to responsible
producer
@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/2...
Obtain a Yield (Libraries)
Info consumers
can understand
economic, IP,
access/preservation
issues especially when
they bec...
Apply Self-Regulation and
Accept Feedback (Holmgren)
• Discourage inappropriate activity to ensure that
systems can contin...
Apply Self-Regulation and
Accept Feedback (Libraries)
• If a user tells us our IR is difficult to use, accept
it and plan ...
Use and Value Renewable
Resources & Services (Holmgren)

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
Use and Value Renewable
Resources & Services (Libraries)

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
Produce No Waste (Holmgren)
• Definition (Mollison) of a pollutant: “As an output of any
system component that is not bein...
Produce No Waste (Libraries)
Connectivity | Shared Resources | Efficiencies
COLLABORATION
SHared Access Research Ecosystem...
Design From Patterns to Details
(Holmgren)
• “Can‟t see the forest for the trees.”
• Step back. Observe patterns in nature...
Design From Patterns to Details
(Libraries)
• Based on the
“patterns” you see in
others‟ practices,
adapt to your own
need...
Integrate Rather Than Segregate
(Holmgren)
• By putting the right things in the right place,
relationships develop between...
Integrate Rather Than Segregate
(Libraries)
• Many cooperative
relationships go into designing
successful systems.
• In fa...
Use Small & Slow Solutions
(Holmgren)
• Systems should be designed to perform functions and
the smallest scale that is pra...
Use Small & Slow Solutions
(Libraries)
• We are indeed moving slowly
and making small changes.

1998

• Working with 1 res...
Use & Value Diversity (Holmgren)
• Diversity values vulnerability to a variety of threats and
takes advantage of the uniqu...
Use & Value Diversity (Libraries)
• Disciplinary differences call
for disciplinary solutions.
• Diversity in hiring keeps
...
Use Edges & Value the Marginal
(Holmgren)
• Design that sees an edge as opportunity rather than a
problem is more likely t...
Use Edges & Value the Marginal
(Libraries)
• Find the “edges” in
your library and
leverage for outreach
and connection.
• ...
Creatively Use & Respond
to Change (Holmgren)
• We can have a positive impact on inevitable change by
carefully observing,...
Creatively Use & Respond
to Change (Libraries)
• Stay engaged in the
conversation
• Changes are happening
in the scholcomm...
Creating Sustainable OA Practice

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
We are all designers
Design maxims that everyone benefits from:
• All observations are relative
• Top down thinking, botto...
References
Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles &
pathways beyond sustainability. Hepburn, Vic.:
Holmgren Design ...
Questions - Discussion

@skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY

10/29/2013
Thank you!
Jen: jlaherty@indiana.edu // @jlaherty
Stacy: skonkiel@indiana.edu // @skonkiel
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Aligning the Principles of Permaculture Design with Sustainable Open Access Practice

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Open Access has seen increased acceptance in recent years, yet academic libraries continue to struggle with supporting and growing the Open Access institutional repositories (IRs) and increasing faculty awareness of and buy-in for Open Access and related scholarly communication issues. In this presentation, we propose a reframing of Open Access and scholarly communication strategies using the twelve principles of permaculture, an environmental design theory that provides a sustainable architecture for self-maintained agricultural systems modeled from naturally occurring ecosystems (Hemenway, 2009). Such an approach is beneficial for many reasons. Permaculture emphasizes maximum benefit from minimum effort and resources, which resonates with libraries that face increased strain on budgets and personnel. Further, the theory encourages that waste of resources and efforts be eliminated completely, which can guide libraries as they move towards maximizing efficiency in a changing academic culture. Permaculture also stresses that practitioners respect the diversity of the smaller ecosystems that make up the bigger picture, a principle which OA advocates and humanists are now advocating. We will share these insights and other such distillations of the permaculture design principles and offer our map to how they can be applied to Open Access and scholarly communication endeavors as we continue to make our path toward sustainable dissemination and preservation practices of today’s research output.

Hemenway, T. (2009). Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture. Chelsea Green Publishing. p. 5.

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  • Before I dive deep into this, I’d like to take some time for each of you to think about issues, problems, areas of concern/interest that relate to open access in your work – whether you’re a scholarly communication designated library staff member or not. To get you thinking about this I want to offer a brief explanation of how permaculture is relevant to scholarly communication by extrapolating the following from the Holgren book we reference throughout: Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles & pathways beyond sustainability. Here’s the big idea, or why I’m here today giving this presentation:We want to consciously designscholarly communication systems which mimic the patterns and relationships found among researchers and creators of scholarly information while yielding an abundance of scholarship available for the provision of local needs.
  • Stacy and I have been working in Scholarly Communication and Open Access efforts directly for 6/4 years (Jen contends its been her whole 20 year career!)Apply these principles at home – Jen and family harvest wood for heating home, solar energy use, board horses, raise chicken, ‘put up’ bountiful produce, etc; Stacy’s partner is a certified permaculture practionerSTACY:As for what drew me to the topic, I’m currently working at the cusp between OA-advocates & researchers in the sciences (who think OA is a common sense move and get very frustrated by what they see as library’s unwillingness to “take a stand”) and librarians (who feel “damned if they do, damned if they don’t” when it comes to subscribing to “Big Pub” journals and enforcing publishers’ copyright restrictions). Also, my move from the private sector back to working in academia has allowed me to see some of the more glaring inefficiencies and nonsensical practices that academia-not just libraries-perpetuates. I’m a staunch believer in higher ed for the public good, not as an incubator or money maker for private interests; that’s why I think we need to rethink some of our practices and take on some of these issues head-on, using a more sustainable means.
  • BIG AG: efficiencies found in using factory farms, monoculture; has a focus on the bottom lineBIG PUB: monolithic publishing houses that serve stockholders over researchers, and focus on the bottom lineImage credits:Factory farm: http://urbanveganchic.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/factory-farm-chickens.jpgMonoculture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicholas_t/4719020153/Bottom line: http://earthandindustry.com/2012/05/newsflash-being-a-good-corporate-citizen-is-good-business/Stock exchange http://biotuesdays.com/2011/03/02/otc-quotation-leaves-many-dazed-and-confused/stock-exchange/Scientisthttp://biotuesdays.com/2011/06/23/ontario-launches-economic-strategy-for-bioscience-sector/scientist-in-lab-250-2/
  • BIG AG: environmental resources, perpetual economic growth (and therefore consumer demand)BIG PUB: library budgets, faculty time and interestPhoto creditsEnvironmental resources http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/lemPerpetual growth http://www.davidyerle.com/is-perpetual-economic-growth-possible/Library budgets http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/law_librarian_blog/2009/02/tough-times-ahe.htmlFaculty time http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/current/2012-02-02/latest-news/win-war-stress-hr-workshops
  • BIG AG: locavores, Back to the Land 2.0, organic consumers / compassionate capitalismBIG PUB: cheap digital publishing systems, Open Access philosophies, article-level metrics over impact factorsImage credits:Back to the land http://lygsbtd.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/poem-summertime-in-sohum/Locavores:http://ilcsm.org/Compassionate capitalism http://www.flickr.com/photos/wayfinder/230644192/lightbox/Digital publishing/wordpresshttp://www.bluedesk.nl/files/billeder/Wordpress.pngOpen access http://lshtmlib.blogspot.com/2011/05/survey-on-open-access.htmlArticle level metrics http://scholarlyoa.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/altmetrics.jpg
  • Permaculture practice is intended to serve 7 generations in the future. You plant a tree not according to today’s climate and your needs, but the expected future climate and needs of the land’s inhabitants. For example, in Indiana, it’s expected that with climate change, our own climate will become much dryer and hotter. As such, we should plant trees that can survive and thrive in such conditions.Image credit: http://plantingmilkwood.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/principles.jpg
  • Preface this to say that all the principles are taken from: Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles &pathways beyond sustainability. The icons and corresponding proverbs from the book are fascinating, but in practicing this presentation we learned we don’t have time to focus on them.Icon: person as a tree (emphasizing ourselves in nature)Proverb: Beauty is in the eye of the beholderPrinciples: By taking time to engage with nature we can design creative solutions that suit our particular situationContinuous observation is at least as important as sifting through the sheer quantity of mediated observationImage credits:Observation point: http://www.aaroads.com/west/wyoming014/us-014a_observation_point_072599.jpgFlower: http://hdwallpapercorner.com/gallery/1954-beautiful-flowers-800x600.jpgChildren playing: http://jenabroad.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/african-children-playing.jpg?w=560&h=421
  • Ideas:Many of our library successes come from 1:1 relationships with researchers; we design solutions to fit them and our local situation. Results typically win:win.Image credits:Conversation: http://media.biola.edu/talbot/static/images/faculty_feature_intro.jpgKeck: http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/coma/images/Keck_lrg.JPGListen: http://chrisbatu.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/How-to-Listen-Well.jpg
  • Icon: Sunshine captured in a bottle (preserving seasonal surplus)Proverb: Make hay while the sun shinesPrinciples:By developing systems that collect resources at peak abundance, we can use them in times of need.Long-term asset building is essential to future generations. Present day ethical behavior / choices leads to this practice.Image credits: Rain barrel: http://images.hayneedle.com/mgen/master:GID036.jpg?is=380,380,0xffffffVegetables: http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Uploads/Graphics/002-0731161628-Canning.jpgCanning: http://cdn.naturallyella.com/files/2012/08/canning.jpgChild: http://www.bioethics.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/207_crop_asian_baby.jpgOld man: http://www.danheller.com/images/Asia/Vietnam/Hue/People/Men/old-man-2.jpg
  • Ideas:Libraries have vision for and practice with developing systems that collect resources at peak abundance.Storing resources in an open manner widely distributes them for future use/re-use.How can we cooperate to do this en masse; we do it very well locally.Image credits;Library: http://images.teamsugar.com/files/upl0/10/104165/10_2008/dv740057.preview.jpgAlexandria: http://deskarati.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/LIBRARY-OF-ALEXANDRIA-1024x670.jpgChapter One: http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/100writing3.jpgTape storage: http://datastoragebuffalo.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Tape-Storage-buffalo-ny-300x240.jpg
  • Icon: Vegetable with a bite out of it (both an immediate yield received and reminds us that others are also attempting to receive a yield from our efforts)Proverb: You can’t work on an empty stomachPrinciples:Ensure that you are getting truly useful rewards, enough to sustain you, as part of the work that you are doing.If we judge our design honestly – looking at successes and failures – we can resist both subsidized delusions of efficiency and rampant disregard for what we are consuming. We become more responsible consumer and producers.Meta-model: moving from dependent and demanding consumer to interdependent and responsible producers.Image credits:Grapes: http://aceoflifewellbeingblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/grapes-300x225.jpgShopper: http://theandrewmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/shopdude.jpgNovella Carpenter: http://img4-3.sunset.timeinc.net/i/2010/03/novella-carpenter-farming-0310-l.jpg?400:400
  • Ideas:Nudging researchers from consumer to producer: many understand the complexities of the economic, IP, and access/preservation issues to help where they can; Libraries are in a good position to nudge as we have large stakes in this realmImage credits:Library use: http://www.letstalklibraries.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Library-user-reads-Journal-article-in-Dinnington-Library.jpgPuzzle globe: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/04/WP_Researcher.pngCopyright: http://www.copyrightauthority.com/copyright-symbol/Copyright-Symbol-images/Copyright_symbol_6.gif$100: http://www.hdwpapers.com/walls/100_dollar_bills_wallpaper-normal.jpg
  • Icon: The whole earth (earth is an archetypical self-regulating whole system – Cool, eh?)Proverb: The sins of the father are visited on the children until the seventh generationPrinciples:We may be forced to self-regulate given reduction in fossil fuel availability.Can’t have it all; we have enormous dependency on large-scale, often remote, systems, for provisioning our needs.Image credits:Milk tanker: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ed/SR_4409_6_Wheeled_Milk_Wagon_Didcot_Railway_Centre.jpg/800px-SR_4409_6_Wheeled_Milk_Wagon_Didcot_Railway_Centre.jpgMilking cow: http://blog.newscom.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/man-milking-cow-in-field.jpg
  • Ideas:Are our IR platform a place to apply corrective and perhaps simple measures now to avoid heavy complications in the future? Think metadata and retrospective conversion projects.Image credits:Repository wordle: http://eresearch.uws.edu.au/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/wpid-or2012Tripreport.docx.htm_or2012Tripreport.docx_filesimage002.png
  • Icon: Horse (best example in human history of human prosperity derived from non-consuming use of nature’s services than the domestication and use of the horse for transport, soil cultivation and general power for a myriad of uses)Proverb: Let nature take its course (human intervention and complication of processes can make things worse and that we should respect and value the wisdom in biological systems and processes)Principles:Make the best use of nature’s abundance to reduce our consumptive behavior and dependence on non-renewal resources.Derive multiple projects from every resource.Image credits:Water cycle: http://extension.usu.edu/waterquality/images/uploads/educator_resources/lesson%20plans/water%20cycle/water%20cycle_NPS.jpg
  • Ideas:Building in costs in budgets to innovate and fund new initiatives rather than relying on dwindling grant support.Better to accept the human behavior of our researchers and find solutions for their problems than building systems they wind up not finding valuable/useful. Respect the natural tendencies; can’t fit a square in a circle.Action Loop:State problem or issue  consider realistic options for actions action  reflect on the result  restate the problem or issues  consider realistic options for action  action  etcImage credit: http://www.whataboutus.org.uk/make_a_difference/action_research_cycle/Action_research_cycle.jpg
  • Icon: Earthworm (part of the web where the outputs of one are the inputs of another)Proverb: A stitch in time same nine; Waste not, want notImage credit:Lettuce: http://www.colourbox.com/preview/3052289-494571-fresh-lettuce-salad-with-roots-in-soil-isolated-on-white.jpg
  • Ideas:There was a time when the data outputs of a research endeavor were considered waste, but not so today. Encourage researchers to store white papers and presentations for possible future use.Use/re-use: Metadata and content format. Applying best practices and standards today should help minimize wasteful retrospective efforts later.Image credits:Metadata: http://databl.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/metadatalovenote.pngDPN: http://www.dpn.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/dpn_logo.pngHathiTrust: http://bioscopic.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/hathitrust1.jpg?w=550
  • Icon: Spider in its web (concentric and radial design evokes zone and sector site planning)Proverb: Can’t see the wood for the trees (details tend to distract us from the nature of the system; can’t comprehend the larger picture if we’re too close)
  • Ideas:Open Access services have benefited from being slow to develop. With resources we can be nimble to respond to the critical needs of users – make few assumptions about what they need up front and go from there (examples: embargoes, DOI, blanket license agreements)Don’t get too bogged down in details of your institution’s bureaucracy when planning services; based on the “patterns” you see in others’ practices, adapt to your own needs, then figure out the details later.For example, take the needs of this group. They’re all men. They’re all Elvis impersonators. Address their basic, shared needs first (ham sandwiches, pomade) then you can worry about the differences in what they need.Image credits:Elvises: http://gocanada.about.com/od/eventsandfestivals/tp/10-Crazy-Canadian-Festivals.htmBees: http://transformationsfhs.wikispaces.com/Part+Ten+-+Tessellations
  • Icon: Top down view of a circle of people or elements forming an integrated system (the apparently empty hole represents the abstract whole system that both arises from the organization of the elements and gives them form and character)Proverb: Many hands make light work
  • Ideas:Many cooperative relationships go into designing successful systems. The Hydra development project is a recent example, as is the Kuali OLE project. Libraries finally getting away from “we built it here” syndrome.In favor of partnerships across campus, and offering diverse services:Research offices and Data Management Plan complianceEmbedding OA services with reference servicesSubject librarians understanding enough to provide information and support for OA.Designing data repositories that connect with Dropbox (Islandora folks are doing this)
  • Icon: Snail (the spiral house of the snail is small enough to be carried on its back and yet capable of incremental growth. With its lubricated foot, the snail easily and deliberately traverses and terrain.)Proverb: The bigger they are, the harder they fall; Slow and steady wins the race (encourages patience and reflection… Tortoise/Hare – taking a long-term perspective is valuable)
  • Ideas:We are certainly making small changes through slow processes.To what extent are we letting the fast paced tech world drive our decisions? They’re intimately linked, but which gorilla should be on top?Changing scholarly communication practices is disruptive, why would we expect researchers to embrace it quickly? Credits:It took 14 years for us to move from SPARC to having a faculty-led charge such as the Cost of Knowledge.Image credits:SPARC: https://mx2.arl.org/Files/SPARC-IR-logo.gifCost of Knowledge: http://thecostofknowledge.com/
  • Icon: Hummingbird/flower (representing great diversity of form (long beaks/ability to hover to sip nectar)Proverb: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket (diversity provides insurance against the vagaries of nature and everyday life)Manifestation: 1 pest can destroy a monoculture crop of corn, but if you plant a diverse array of produce you are protecting your investment against losing it all in a fell swoop.
  • Ideas:Not every discipline or even every person needs the same solutions; their issues are inherently different.Valuing diversity in hiring, not only gender and race, but education and experience. Avoid groupthink and emotional baggage that something keeps organizations from changing for the better.As long as the local solution is built on standards of sharing data with other systems, the local solution can take on whatever facets it needs to serve its community.Image credits:Beaker: http://www.korematsupto.org/2011/05/03/korematsu-science-fair-wednesday-may-4th/Religious painting: http://www.umbra.org/news/2011/3-25-2010-umbra-professor-presents-at-conference/Diversity: http://recruitmentbuzz.co.uk/diversity-as-a-driver-of-your-employment-brand-2/Free information exchange: http://abouthipaa.com/hipaa-hitech-news/booz-allen-hamilton-on-health-information-exchanges/
  • Icon: Sun coming up over horizon with a river in the foreground (this image shows us a world composed of edges – where all these things meet)Proverb: Don’t think you are on the right track just because it is a well beaten path (reminds us that the most common, obvious and popular is not necessary the most significant or influential)
  • Ideas:In-library (or close campus) partnerships (writing center, innovative center for teaching/learning, university press, etc.) are valuable and provide a greater opportunity for outreach and connection.Value your water cooler conversations. Serendipity plays a big role in revealing margins. Cultivating relationships beyond the reach of every day work helps identify the innovators and the margins. Building relationships across all of campus—not just traditional and strategically valuable partners--can help you identify the innovators and encourage evolution of your scholcomm program.Image credits: Edges: http://www.flickr.com/photos/naturewise/4071773181/sizes/m/in/photostream/Suits: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/race-society/minority-vulnerability-privileged-occupations-african-american-financial-advisers-firmHandshake: http://www.thehrisworld.com/building-relationships-employees/
  • Icon: Butterfly (transformation of caterpillar conveys the idea of adaptive chance that is uplifting rather than threatening)Proverb: Vision is not seeing things as they are but as they will bePrinciples:4 phases of ecosystem change:Conservation: long lived steady state climax where there is a high degree of interconnection between system elements, a large amount of stored biological capital and little leakage of nutrients.Release: the pulse of disturbance, typically very short in duration. Breaks the connectivity and allows the risky and uncertain development of new connections during the reorg phase.Reorganization: the most unstable phase when open niches soluble nutrients and energy are available to be tapped or loss. During this phase there is the potential to flip to some system that is less or more production and organized. Exploitation: fast growing pioneer species colonize the opportunities catch and store energy quickly and cement the patterns for the more gradual build up of biomass and great connectedness leading toward a new conservation phase. The real power of the disturbances show up here before settling into a new long conservation phase. If the new conservation phase lasts a long time and survives several cycles of disturbance then we could accept it having achieved some sort of evolutionary success.
  • Ideas:Stay engaged; How can we help people become responsible producers of information, not only dependent consumers?Changes are happening in the scholarly communication “ecosystem”; how can we use them to our advantage? (OSTP Directive on public access; what if SHARE had been announced before CHORUS?)4 phases in an ecosystem:Conservation: Traditional 20th century publishingRelease: OA as a transformative changeReorganization: Flopping around trying to find stability; we’re taking advantage of many innovations and trying to find the ones that can stick.Exploitation: Not here yetImage credits:Engaged group: http://www.tanveernaseer.com/5-employee-engagement-strategies-jonathan-mcclellan-hallmark/OSTP:http://openaccess.eprints.org/index.php?/categories/16-Publishing-Lobby
  • What has worked for us at IU?Observe & interact: Journal publishing, various flavors to fit needs; host completely, host back-end; host only backfile; use it to publish one-off’s. PKP/OJS.Catch and store energy: Adhering to metadata standards open archives initiative for object reuse and exchange.Obtain a yield: Working with emeriti faculty like Dr. Ruth Engs, IU School of Public Health, to secure access to and preservation of their important life works.Use and value renewable resources and services: HathiTrust, liberating folklore publications there instead of in IR.Integrate rather than segregate: Bringing in copyright experts and students from law school to serve in our OSP Copyright Management Center, in addition to limited library staff with expertise.Use and value diversity: IU Press staff; subject librarians, campus advocates.Use the edge and value the marginal: Inviting a PI in biology to join a “meet and greet” with Pete Binfield from PeerJ over beers cemented existing relationship with scholarly communication team and also opened an opportunity for her to work with Pete on mutually beneficial projects.Design from patterns to details: change in communication practices; more sophisticated options using FootPrints system.Image credits:Beer: http://almassevillistas.blogspot.com/2011/07/donde-se-pongan-unas-buenas-rubias.htmlLawyer Barbie: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2011/01/letter-from-amerikat-birthday-bits-n.htmlOpen Folklore: http://www.libraries.iub.edu/OpenFolkloreLogo.pngOAI-ORE: http://ptsefton.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/331aac20s526x355.jpgIU Press: Ruth Engs: http://wfiu.org/profiles/files/2008/12/untitled15.jpgPKP: https://pkp.sfu.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/pkp_logo_vert3.pngFootprints: https://footprints.iu.edu/MRimg/powered_by.gif (FootPrints is a web-based service desk application from BMC used to record and track support and customer service requests in departments across Indiana University.)
  • Transcript of "Aligning the Principles of Permaculture Design with Sustainable Open Access Practice"

    1. 1. Aligning the Principles of Permaculture Design with Sustainable Open Access Practice Open Access Un/Conference: Promote, Impact, Assess San Jose State University || October 25, 2013 Jennifer Laherty 10/29/2013 Digital Publishing Librarian IU Libraries-Bloomington Stacy Konkiel Science Data Management Librarian IU Libraries-Bloomington
    2. 2. Handout: http://goo.gl/T9bR29: Twitter: #PermOA and #OAW13 @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    3. 3. Stacy Konkiel https://twitter.com/skonkiel Research interests include data information literacy for graduate and undergraduate populations, as well as the application of altmetrics in academic library settings. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    4. 4. Overview • • • • • Why this topic now? What is Permaculture? The Scholarly Communication landscape The 12 principles of Permaculture design Creating sustainable Open Access practice • Discussion @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    5. 5. Why this topic now? • Many years; effecting change; slowly • Burnout, sure, but running through all our efforts is a positive vein • Needed a boost of spirit; enter Permaculture Design Principles @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    6. 6. What is Permaculture? An ecological design system for sustainability. create community build grow & restore @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    7. 7. Bill Mollison Permaculture is a „Positivistic‟ response to environmental crisis. It is about what we want to do and can do rather than what we oppose and want others to change. This response is both ethical and pragmatic, philosophical and technical. Mollison, B. C., & Holmgren, D. (1987). Permaculture one: a perennial agriculture for human settlements. Tyalgum, N.S.W.: Tagari. Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles & pathways beyond sustainability. Hepburn, Vic.: Holmgren Design Services. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    8. 8. The Scholarly Communication Landscape Reality #1: We live in a capitalist society. Big Ag @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY Big Pub 10/29/2013
    9. 9. The Scholarly Communication Landscape Reality #2: Our current systems are based on the assumption of unlimited resources. Big Ag @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY Big Pub 10/29/2013
    10. 10. The Scholarly Communication Landscape Reality #3: New technologies and philosophies are upending the dominance of traditional systems. Big Ag @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY Big Pub 10/29/2013
    11. 11. The 12 Permaculture Principles & 3 Ethics @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    12. 12. Observe & Interact (Holmgren) Observe Continuously | Evolve | Adapt | Avoid Copying Gimmicks @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    13. 13. Observe & Interact (Libraries) Listen | Build Relationships | Observe | Design | Reply Win:Win @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    14. 14. Catch & Store Energy (Holmgren) Collect at peak abundance; build assets for future generations. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    15. 15. Catch & Store Energy (Libraries) We do this. Question today: how to do this cooperatively while serving locally? @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    16. 16. Obtain a Yield (Holmgren) Move from demanding consumer to responsible producer @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    17. 17. Obtain a Yield (Libraries) Info consumers can understand economic, IP, access/preservation issues especially when they become info producers If something we‟re doing Isn‟t benefiting the library community, or larger community, change/stop. Example: storing data. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    18. 18. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback (Holmgren) • Discourage inappropriate activity to ensure that systems can continue to function well. • By empowering ourselves, we contribute to a more balanced world. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    19. 19. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback (Libraries) • If a user tells us our IR is difficult to use, accept it and plan to incorporate change in future design. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    20. 20. Use and Value Renewable Resources & Services (Holmgren) @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    21. 21. Use and Value Renewable Resources & Services (Libraries) @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    22. 22. Produce No Waste (Holmgren) • Definition (Mollison) of a pollutant: “As an output of any system component that is not being used productively by any other component of the system.” • Minimize/eliminate waste. • What looks like waste could be exchange. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    23. 23. Produce No Waste (Libraries) Connectivity | Shared Resources | Efficiencies COLLABORATION SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    24. 24. Design From Patterns to Details (Holmgren) • “Can‟t see the forest for the trees.” • Step back. Observe patterns in nature and society which can form the backbone of our designs. Fill in details as we go. Complex systems that work tend to evolve from simples ones that work. • Need to develop a shared language for talking about scale because it is a constant source of error and misunderstanding in any collective action. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    25. 25. Design From Patterns to Details (Libraries) • Based on the “patterns” you see in others‟ practices, adapt to your own needs, then figure out the details later. • Make generalizations based on observed disciplinary needs, tailor to individual needs later. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    26. 26. Integrate Rather Than Segregate (Holmgren) • By putting the right things in the right place, relationships develop between those things and they work together to support each other. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    27. 27. Integrate Rather Than Segregate (Libraries) • Many cooperative relationships go into designing successful systems. • In favor of partnerships across campus, and offering diverse services. Copyright advice from lawyers in the library Designing data repositories that connect with Dropbox @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    28. 28. Use Small & Slow Solutions (Holmgren) • Systems should be designed to perform functions and the smallest scale that is practical and energy-efficient for that function. • Working to produce anything of value can be a painstaking experience when we are used to seeing things apparently appear from nowhere. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    29. 29. Use Small & Slow Solutions (Libraries) • We are indeed moving slowly and making small changes. 1998 • Working with 1 researcher at a time allows us build capacity to help whole departments. 2012 @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    30. 30. Use & Value Diversity (Holmgren) • Diversity values vulnerability to a variety of threats and takes advantage of the unique nature of the environment in which it resides. • Think systematically, accept diversity. • Innovators doing interesting things – which may or may not be worthy of further development – can provide information that others may find useful in developing their own unique sustainable solutions. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    31. 31. Use & Value Diversity (Libraries) • Disciplinary differences call for disciplinary solutions. • Diversity in hiring keeps organizations changing for the better. • Freely exchanging information with other libraries allows you to learn and adapt new solutions to your own needs. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    32. 32. Use Edges & Value the Marginal (Holmgren) • Design that sees an edge as opportunity rather than a problem is more likely to be successful and adaptable. • The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place. These are often the most valuable, diverse and productive elements in the system. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    33. 33. Use Edges & Value the Marginal (Libraries) • Find the “edges” in your library and leverage for outreach and connection. • Build relationships across all of campus. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    34. 34. Creatively Use & Respond to Change (Holmgren) • We can have a positive impact on inevitable change by carefully observing, and then intervening at the right time. • While stability is important, evolutionary change is essential. Durability, depends, paradoxically, on flexibility and change. • 4 phases of ecosystem change: o o o o Conservation Release Reorganization Exploitation @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    35. 35. Creatively Use & Respond to Change (Libraries) • Stay engaged in the conversation • Changes are happening in the scholcomm “ecosystem”; how can we use them to our advantage? @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    36. 36. Creating Sustainable OA Practice @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    37. 37. We are all designers Design maxims that everyone benefits from: • All observations are relative • Top down thinking, bottom up action • The landscape is the textbook • Failure is useful so long as we learn • Elegant solutions are simple even invisible • Make the smallest intervention necessary • Avoid too much of a good thing • The problem is the solution • Recognize and break out of design cul-de-sacs Source: Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles & pathways beyond sustainability. Hepburn, Vic.: 10/29/2013 Holmgren Design Services. Page 15. @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY
    38. 38. References Holmgren, D. (2002). Permaculture: principles & pathways beyond sustainability. Hepburn, Vic.: Holmgren Design Services. Holmgren, D (2012). The Essence of permaculture: a summary Of permaculture concepts and principles taken from ‘Permaculture principles & pathways beyond sustainability.’ http://holmgren.com.au/downloads/Essence_of_Pc_EN.pdf http://www.permaculture.org/ @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    39. 39. Questions - Discussion @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
    40. 40. Thank you! Jen: jlaherty@indiana.edu // @jlaherty Stacy: skonkiel@indiana.edu // @skonkiel Download this presentation: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/16976 SlideShare http://openlibrarian.org @skonkiel; @jlaherty; #PermOA; CC-BY 10/29/2013
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