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NCMM Reload13 social media workshop- Jeff Abramovitz

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Leveraging Social Media For Effective Ministry - Given as a workshop at the NCMM Reload '13 Conference in Washington, D.C. September 17, 2013.

Leveraging Social Media For Effective Ministry - Given as a workshop at the NCMM Reload '13 Conference in Washington, D.C. September 17, 2013.

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  • Start with story of Richfield village Disturbing infrastructure issues critical to the village’s future confronted the people of postwar Richfield. The village lacked classroom space and a senior high school, it had no movie theater, no bowling alley, no baseball or football field, no swimming beach, it had no city water supply or storm and sanitary sewer systems, and it faced loss of land due to expansion of the airport. World war had shoved all these problems into the background, but they were now back and more pressing than ever, it Richfield did have a new municipal liquor store and it was doing very well, producing nearly twelve thousand dollars in its first ten months of operation. Village leaders came to depend upon this money for postwar civic projects. Even before the war’s end, a relaxation of the strict limits on building led some Richfield contractors back to their blueprints. The village issued thirty-one building permits in September 1944. [20] In June 1945, with war now ended in Europe and winding down in Asia, the Richfield News reported the “partial release” of building materials for the home front which proclaimed, “Richfield is starting to revert back to pre-war building activity.” [21] In June 1944 Congress had passed the GI Bill of Rights designe d to help returning veterans restart their lives. One such benefit affected Richfield directly. The GI Bill subsidized veterans’ mortgages helping them to buy their own housing. By December 1945 the military discharged about 1.25 million men each month. The nation needed five million houses immediately, but almost no homes were available. In Richfield and other suburbs a new kind of American army, a legion of house builders, put up modest, single-family dwellings to combat the housing shortage. Richfield became a Minnesota model for suburban growth. Housing development along Washburn Avenue. The stunning growth of Richfield and similar American suburbs was changing the face of America. These flourishing communities were coming into their own as the peacetime economy gathered momentum, spurred, in no small part, by suburban home construction. Young families signed up for houses in once distant farm fields as fast as builders could nail them together. [22] Between 1940 and 195 0, R ichfield experienced a population increase of 363 percent. During the following five-year period the city nearly doubled its populace again, pushing toward a total of thirty-five thousand. Already ranked as Minnesota’s sixth largest community, there was no question the booming suburb would surpass forty thousand residents by the end of the decade. Richfield held the unofficial title of Minnesota’s “fastest growing community,” the most prominent among those suburbs growing up around Minneapolis and St. Paul. During the 1950s, America’s suburban population grew at a rate three times faster than that of central cities. Suburbanites made up just over one-quarter of the population in the nation’s metropolitan areas in 1950. Ten years later, about half of metro area residents lived in the suburbs. [23] Richfield’s farm fields fill ed with homes during the twenty-five years following World War II. By 1970 all developable land in the community was taken. Home construction crews applied the “mass-production” systems perfected by the American auto industry. Marlin Grant began his career in construction as a Richfield carpenter and saw the home building process as “fun.” Local builders used just two or three basic house designs, so Grant and his colleagues carried blueprints in their heads. As one writer noted of suburban builders, "it was not the assembly line that moved but the workers. [24] The people of Richfield embr aced their city’s reputation as a “ bedroom community ” and used that term in describing it . They made a conscious decision to build few sidewalks in the village, readily adopting the prevail ing subur ban notion that streets were enough. “We wanted people to know that when they cross 62 (the Crosstown Highway border) they weren’t in Minneapolis anymore,” said a proud citizen of more than five decades. [25]
  • At the end of our session if you haven’t understood why your content needs to include being: -Shareable -Appropriately used within the right network -prepared for the optimal visibility for both device and screen -Reachable by the right audience and -Have an element of utility or useability Than I haven’t done my job. First, let’s look at some of the numbers related to social media…
  • In a see of faces, men in your church, community and nation, who is that you are trying to reach? Do you know? Maybe it’s a chance for you to get a new, fresh look at your vision, mission and passion.
  • Give them a minute to write down 3-4 characteristics of the men/people they minister to
  • What makes content Shareable? When people search online will they find you? Are you where the right target for your ministry/organization is and if so, can they see you?
  • What do YOU share with others? (ask audience)
  • When you put content for your ministry/organization through the grid of Social Currency Triggers Emotion Public Practical Value Story And overlay Christianity on top of it Then mix in issues that people care about, it’s not hard to start coming up with content that you can share that will reach your audience. Examples: What is going on in your community? Are there missions work your church/men are engaged in. Is there one guy who is doing something interesting, causal that you can share as a story? Capture on a video? Is there a family story that is worth sharing from someone in your congregation, ministry, staff? What can you share about your team? Volunteers? Those who have partnered with you (not to move people through manipulation) financailly as to why they support you and your mission? How about stories from the event? Speaker Q&A? Surveys of men in your group as to what they want. Consider how to elevate other good organizations in your community, church, city, etc. Spread their good news.
  • Principle 1: Social Currency How does it make people look to talk about a product or idea? Most people would rather look smart than dumb, rich than poor, and cool than geeky. Just like the clothes we wear and the cars we drive, what we talk about influences how others see us. It’s social currency. Knowing about cool things— like a blender that can tear through an iPhone— makes people seem sharp and in the know. So to get people talking we need to craft messages that help them achieve these desired impressions. We need to find our inner remarkability and make people feel like insiders. We need to leverage game mechanics to give people ways to achieve and provide visible symbols of status that they can show to others. Principle 2: Triggers How do we remind people to talk about our products and ideas? Triggers are stimuli that prompt people to think about related things. Peanut butter reminds us of jelly and the word “dog” reminds us of the word “cat.” If you live in Philadelphia, seeing a cheesesteak might remind you of the hundred-dollar one at Barclay Prime. People often talk about whatever comes to mind, so the more often people think about a product or idea, the more it will be talked about. We need to design products and ideas that are frequently triggered by the environment and create new triggers by linking our products and ideas to prevalent cues in that environment. Top of mind leads to tip of tongue.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 22-23). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Principle 3: Emotion When we care, we share. So how can we craft messages and ideas that make people feel something? Naturally contagious content usually evokes some sort of emotion. Blending an iPhone is surprising. A potential tax hike is infuriating. Emotional things often get shared. So rather than harping on function, we need to focus on feelings. But as we’ll discuss, some emotions increase sharing, while others actually decrease it. So we need to pick the right emotions to evoke. We need to kindle the fire. Sometimes even negative emotions may be useful. Principle 4: Public Can people see when others are using our product or engaging in our desired behavior? The famous phrase “Monkey see, monkey do” captures more than just the human tendency to imitate. It also tells us that it’s hard to copy something you can’t see. Making things more observable makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular. So we need to make our products and ideas more public. We need to design products and initiatives that advertise themselves and create behavioral residue that sticks around even after people have bought the product or espoused the idea. Principle 5: Practical Value How can we craft content that seems useful? People like to help others, so if we can show them how our products or ideas will save time, improve health, or save money, they’ll spread the word. But given how inundated people are with information, we need to make our message stand out. We need to understand what makes something seem like a particularly good deal. We need to highlight the incredible value of what we offer— monetarily and otherwise. And we need to package our knowledge and expertise so that people can easily pass it on. Principle 6: Stories What broader narrative can we wrap our idea in? People don’t just share information, they tell stories. But just like the epic tale of the Trojan Horse, stories are vessels that carry things such as morals and lessons. Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter. So we need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell. But we need to do more than just tell a great story. We need to make virality valuable. We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 1: Social Currency How does it make people look to talk about a product or idea? Most people would rather look smart than dumb, rich than poor, and cool than geeky. Just like the clothes we wear and the cars we drive, what we talk about influences how others see us. It’s social currency. Knowing about cool things— like a blender that can tear through an iPhone— makes people seem sharp and in the know. So to get people talking we need to craft messages that help them achieve these desired impressions. We need to find our inner remarkability and make people feel like insiders. We need to leverage game mechanics to give people ways to achieve and provide visible symbols of status that they can show to others. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Social Currency..
  • Principle 2: Triggers How do we remind people to talk about our products and ideas? Triggers are stimuli that prompt people to think about related things. Peanut butter reminds us of jelly and the word “dog” reminds us of the word “cat.” If you live in Philadelphia, seeing a cheesesteak might remind you of the hundred-dollar one at Barclay Prime. People often talk about whatever comes to mind, so the more often people think about a product or idea, the more it will be talked about. We need to design products and ideas that are frequently triggered by the environment and create new triggers by linking our products and ideas to prevalent cues in that environment. Top of mind leads to tip of tongue. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 22-23). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Triggers can help products and ideas catch on, but some stimuli are better triggers than others. As we discussed, one key factor is how frequently the stimulus occurs. Hot chocolate would also have fitted really well with Kit Kat, and the sweet beverage might have even complemented the chocolate bar’s flavor better than coffee. But coffee is a more effective trigger because people think about and see it much more frequently. Most people drink hot chocolate only in the winter, while coffee is consumed year-round. Similarly, Michelob ran a successful campaign in the 1970s that linked weekends with the beer brand (“ Weekends are made for Michelob”). However, that wasn’t the slogan when the campaign started out. Originally the slogan was “Holidays are made for Michelob.” But this proved ineffective because the chosen stimuli— holidays— don’t happen that often. So Anheuser-Busch revised the slogan to “Weekends are made for Michelob,” which was much more successful. Frequency, however, must also be balanced with the strength of the link. The more things a given cue is associated with, the weaker any given association. It’s like poking a hole in the bottom of a paper cup filled with water. Triggers and cues lead people to talk, choose, and use. Social currency gets people talking, but Triggers keep them talking. Top of mind means tip of tongue.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 92). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 85-86). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Hashtags Name of group Wherever you are be there
  • Principle 2: Triggers How do we remind people to talk about our products and ideas? Triggers are stimuli that prompt people to think about related things. Peanut butter reminds us of jelly and the word “dog” reminds us of the word “cat.” If you live in Philadelphia, seeing a cheesesteak might remind you of the hundred-dollar one at Barclay Prime. People often talk about whatever comes to mind, so the more often people think about a product or idea, the more it will be talked about. We need to design products and ideas that are frequently triggered by the environment and create new triggers by linking our products and ideas to prevalent cues in that environment. Top of mind leads to tip of tongue. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 22-23). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Hashtags Name of group Wherever you are be there Examples: Stepping Up to courageous manhood
  • Principle 3: Emotion When we care, we share. So how can we craft messages and ideas that make people feel something? Naturally contagious content usually evokes some sort of emotion. Blending an iPhone is surprising. A potential tax hike is infuriating. Emotional things often get shared. So rather than harping on function, we need to focus on feelings. But as we’ll discuss, some emotions increase sharing, while others actually decrease it. So we need to pick the right emotions to evoke. We need to kindle the fire. Sometimes even negative emotions may be useful. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Puppies, kittens, babies, sunsets....why are these things shared so much? many times information is not enough. Most teens don’t smoke because they think it’s good for them. And most people who scarf down a Big Mac and large fries and wash it down with a supersized Coke are not oblivious to the health risks. So additional information probably won’t get them to change their behavior. They need something more. And that is where emotion comes in. Rather than harping on features or facts, we need to focus on feelings; the underlying emotions that motivate people to action.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 112-113). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 4: Public Can people see when others are using our product or engaging in our desired behavior? The famous phrase “Monkey see, monkey do” captures more than just the human tendency to imitate. It also tells us that it’s hard to copy something you can’t see. Making things more observable makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular. So we need to make our products and ideas more public. We need to design products and initiatives that advertise themselves and create behavioral residue that sticks around even after people have bought the product or espoused the idea. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. .
  • Principle 5: Practical Value How can we craft content that seems useful? People like to help others, so if we can show them how our products or ideas will save time, improve health, or save money, they’ll spread the word. But given how inundated people are with information, we need to make our message stand out. We need to understand what makes something seem like a particularly good deal. We need to highlight the incredible value of what we offer— monetarily and otherwise. And we need to package our knowledge and expertise so that people can easily pass it on. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 6: Stories What broader narrative can we wrap our idea in? People don’t just share information, they tell stories. But just like the epic tale of the Trojan Horse, stories are vessels that carry things such as morals and lessons. Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter. So we need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell. But we need to do more than just tell a great story. We need to make virality valuable. We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • What made “Jesus” worth sharing? And, what did Jesus share? Miracles he did Words he said Parables he told Uniqueness of how Jesus shared the same principles with different audiences. Good News SO, HOW CAN WE LEARN FROM STEPPS AND JESUS? Create content that is compelling enough to be shared. Find the nugget in an otherwise boring or typical story. What’s the twist? What is unique? No two stories are ever the same.
  • What’s working on each of the sites? For Facebook—review posts each week. By using your FB Insights you see which posts are reaching more people, getting more likes, shares and comments. Look for some FB influencers…those who share more frequently and who seem to be fully engaged with your ministry/org. (show them how to see this on some posts) Engage with those who engage with you. Tools like “Likealyzer” or other paid tools like Hootsuite, Sprout Social can tell you what is being shared in “prettier” formats. For Twitter: What’s being retweeted? After you post are you noticing more people following you? Can you identify influencers who have recently followed you, retweeted you or favorited your posts. Engage with others around issues and/or people that are more closely tied to your ministry. Sure, talk about the football game or recent social activities but make sure you engage in conversations that relate to key topics you want to further. For LinkedIn Are there groups you can join that would be a great place for you to engage with other thought leaders What other groups might help you get exposed to those in your community who might be potentially interested in your ministry if they knew about you? Make sure you contribute to the group for a while before you ever ask for anything from them if this is your first introduction to them.
  • SEO is becoming much trickier and all encompassing. It’s no longer simply about being found in Google because Google, though still the largest search engine, is now in competition for search with Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social networks.
  • SEO is becoming much trickier and all encompassing. It’s no longer simply about being found in Google because Google, though still the largest search engine, is now in competition for search with Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social networks. Keywords are still important - You need to identify keywords that a) people are already finding your website and b) what words that have search volume they MIGHT find your website. Continually search is including more and more real time sharing and social sites. Links to your site Content which appropriately contains keywords SEO isn’t easy and you won’t get on the first line of the first page overnight, or maybe at all if your keywords pit you against behemoths. But, you can get found with content you create for keywords that relate to your ministry/mission that might be just the thing someone needs to find out that you exist. Facebook graph search is pretty powerful as well. [quick demonstration]
  • In addition to the standard tools available to you, i.e., Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks, if you can master another one of these tools, you might be able to drive more traffic, gain more names and more social engagement Video channels (how to’s/informational/educational) YouTube and Vimeo (more traditional type of video channels) Vine and Instagram videos – short snippets where you can be creative (show Oreo Vine) related to ministry, mission trips, events, etc. Podcasting (creating a podcast could allow you to be identified as a leader and provide a new channel for you to reach more people) Blogging (this one seems to be fairly common but it could be a huge catalyst to directing people to your website via search, provide a chance for you to share some thoughts, incites that you may not get to share regularly, be material for future things like books, events, etc. Mobile Apps Contests/Games/Giveaways
  • Some of this is overlap with the TOOLS we just discussed but the idea hear is people share what they see, not always what they read and hardly ever what is linked. It’s why they share Sy or Miley Cyrus, cute puppies or beautiful sunsets. It’s increasingly hard to get others to share your things but
  • Some of this is overlap with the TOOLS we just discussed but the idea hear is people share what they see, not always what they read and hardly ever what is linked. It’s why they share Sy or Miley Cyrus, cute puppies or beautiful sunsets. It’s increasingly hard to get others to share your things but
  • I call this Youtility. Not “utility,” because a utility is a faceless commodity. Youtility is marketing upside down. Instead of marketing that’s needed by companies, Youtility is marketing that’s wanted by customers. Youtility is massively useful information, provided for free, that creates long-term trust and kinship between your company and your customers. The difference between helping and selling is just two letters. But those two letters now make all the difference. The way customers gather information about companies and make purchase decisions has changed. Consumers’ time and attention has never been more scarce, and their suspicion of lazy interruption marketing has never been more acute. In this climate, Youtility is not an option; it’s necessary.Baer, Jay (2013-06-27). Youtility: Why Smart Marketing Is about Help Not Hype (p. 3). Penguin Group US. Kindle Edition.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 5 Keys to Leverage Social Media Jeff Abramovitz 2Degrees Media September 17, 2013
    • 2. What we will cover: Social by the numbers… Do you know who you are and who knows you? 5 Other Keys to Consider in Leveraging Social Media S – Share-ability and Search-ability T – Tool-ability O – Observe-ability R – Reach-ability Y – YOUs-ability
    • 3. Half of all social media users under age 35 follow their online friends’ product and service recommendations. (TECHi) But it’s vital for businesses to have a Facebook presence: 80% of Faceook users prefer to connect with brands on Facebook. (WordPress Hosting SEO) While 75% of internet users over age 45 prefer to share information using email, 60% of those under 30 say the same for Facebook. (Relevanza)
    • 4. LinkedIn rules for business owners. Asked which social media tool had the greatest potential to help their firms, 41% of small business owners chose LinkedIn. More CEOs chose LinkedIn than chose Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+ and Pinterest combined. (Marketing Charts) LinkedIn is the “social platform of choice” for companies in the Inc. 500, the index of the fastest-growing companies in the U.S. 81% of these firms use LinkedIn, compared to 67% on both Facebook and Twitter. (Relevanza) 80% of LinkedIn users are at least 30 years old. (Relevanza)
    • 5. We know the what...do we know WHO?
    • 6. “The best form of marketing and public relations is STILL about using content to reach people and drive action.” David Meerman Scott
    • 7. A good Social Media Ministry Strategy is about expanding the Vision and message of your Ministry through Social Media while Connecting, Engaging and Influencing for the Kingdom of God. Darryl Bozemen
    • 8. Quotes from social media expert, Jay Baer
    • 9. So, who is your audience?
    • 10. S – Shareability and Searchability
    • 11. 5 Other Keys to Consider in Leveraging Social Media S – Share-ability and Search- ability T – Tool-ability O – Observe-ability R – Reach-ability Y – Youtility (from Jay Baer’s book)
    • 12. What Makes Content able ?
    • 13. What do we like to share? What do people share with us?
    • 14. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 15. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 16. People share things that make them look good to others. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 33). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
    • 17. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 18. #hashtag Name of group What are you known for? What is a trigger that already exists or that you can create?
    • 19. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 20. What things elicit emotions?
    • 21. What things elicit emotions?
    • 22. What things elicit emotions?
    • 23. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 24. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 25. *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story
    • 26. What did people share in the New Testament? How did they share it?
    • 27. Share what works.
    • 28. SEO isn't a tactic, it's a key part of the content marketing process. The most beautifully written, provocative content achieves nothing if no-one can find and engage with it. Keyword research is critical to both content creation and distribution Brian Clark, Founder of Copyblogger and serial online entrepreneur
    • 29. What makes something searchable?
    • 30. T – Tool-ability
    • 31. What are some of the tools available that will help you reach and stand out from the crowd
    • 32. O - Observability Mobile Website Video Images
    • 33. R - Reachability Use appropriate channels Find out where your audience is Determine what tools / new tools – -- channels you should be in -- channels your current audience is in -- channels you are in but not all in
    • 34. Y - Youtility You can’t always be amazing but you can always be YOUseful
    • 35. Men...we are in competition for the men in our midst whether that is in our church and community, businesses, readers of our books or watchers of our movies.
    • 36. Looking to revamp, revise and revitalize your online presence? We know how tough it is to run a ministry and keep your online presence updated. We want to help so we created Affordable Ministry Sites to provide AFFORDABLE WEBSITES for MINISTRIES! SPECIAL PRICING THROUGH OCTOBER 31 FOR NCMM RELOAD PARTICIPANTS. http://www.AFFORDABLEMINISTRYSITES.com
    • 37. If you are struggling to develop a social media strategy that works, want to do something different to engage your audience, grow your ministry through social media, learn how to use various tools and networks, I’m your man. I will train you, help you develop a strategy, guide you through implementation, analyze your current social media efforts, help you integrate email and social or just provide periodic coaching that you can afford. Go to http://www.2degreesmedia.com and find out more or email me at jeff@2degreesmedia.com SPECIAL PRICING FOR NCMM RELOAD ’13 PARTICIPANTS. ASK ME WHEN YOU CALL OR EMAIL
    • 38. THANK YOU!!

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