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Best Ways to use Social
Media
And other things to know about Digital Media
Little Rock Chapter of the
Christian Writers As...
My Story
LinkedIn/Facebook/Q&A
What do I say in Social Media?
Wheredo I belong in Social Media?
Who do I target in Social Media?
Wh...
By the numbers
QuickTime™ and a
decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
Socialnomics 2013 by Erik Qualman
Social Media is
Social Media is
The role of social media is critical
because it helps to spread cognitive
dissonance by connecting thought...
Social ‘ME’dia
You Must Answer This
Who are you trying to reach?
photo by Dieter Drescher
What do you have that they want?
And This
by Brian Solis, The End of Business as usual
from The End of Business as Usual by Brian Solis
Brands are either part of the conversation or they’re not and
as a result...
Data Avalanche
To understand the mindset of the connected
consumer, one must realize that everything
begins with search and intent
Why?
Why do you exist?
Write your mission statement?
We exist to _______
Who do I target?
Friends (easiest)Friends (easiest)
Friends of FriendsFriends of Friends
Similar InterestsSimilar Interest...
Who do I target?
Friends (easiest)Friends (easiest)
Friends of FriendsFriends of Friends
Similar InterestsSimilar Interest...
Paid - Owned - Earned
Content Types
When is Junk Mail Not?
When Is Junk Content Not?
Be Remarkable
Who?
Who are you writing to?
Identify your audience persona --
My audience is _______?
The 5 C’s of Community
Content
Conversation
Continuit
y
Commerc
e
Connecti
on Relevance
Value
Incentives
From Brian Solis,...
Where should you have presence
Digital
Social Networks
What we usually see
Finding Your Niche
Where will you go?
Where?
Where will you be available?
I will focus learning and understanding the
following platforms to begin/grow my socia...
Social ToolsSocial Tools
The Social Media Stool
What Works?
Content
Good Content is:
ASK
Create
Curate
Share
urposeRep
CUR-ATE TO CRE-ATE
Content that “sells”
Datanalysis = Content
able
?
What makes content...
Shareability
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
*From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on ...
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
People share things that make them
look good to others.
Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 33...
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
When I say “peanut butter”
What Kind of music?
Who drives this?
Who drives this?
#hashtag Name of group
What are you known for?
What is a trigger that
already exists or that you
can create?
What are your...
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
What things elicit emotions?
Share What Works
Shareability
Shareability
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
1.Social Currency
2.Triggers
3.Emotion
4.Public
5.Practical Value
6.Story
Shareability
Shareability
Facebook
Facebook
Reasons why they “Unlike” you on Facebook:
Facebook
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
LinkedIn
Keys to a successful LinkedIn Presence:
•Profile Completed with Keywords
•Good Images for Profile Pers/Bus
•Exper...
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Some Other ideas...
•Internal sharing and support is crucial
•Multiple authors for your organizations blog (B2B)
•Keep eac...
Some Other tools...
-Twitter/Scheduling tools
> Hootsuite
> Sprout Social
> Social Oomph
> Buffer
-Facebook Posting
> Post...
Q&A
Thank you
We are offering small businesses affordable,
customized, professional looking websites for a fraction
of the cos...
Thank you
I provide coaching, training, strategic planning and execution
of digital media for businesses, non profits and ...
Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social
Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social
Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social
Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social
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Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social

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This is a presentation given for a group of International Management Accountants in Northwest Arkansas. Helping them understand the value of social media for an organizations.

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  • Brands are either part of the conversation or they’re not and as a result, they’re either part of the decision-making cycle or they’re absent from the heart, mind, and actions of the connected customer
  • Principle 1: Social Currency How does it make people look to talk about a product or idea? Most people would rather look smart than dumb, rich than poor, and cool than geeky. Just like the clothes we wear and the cars we drive, what we talk about influences how others see us. It’s social currency. Knowing about cool things— like a blender that can tear through an iPhone— makes people seem sharp and in the know. So to get people talking we need to craft messages that help them achieve these desired impressions. We need to find our inner remarkability and make people feel like insiders. We need to leverage game mechanics to give people ways to achieve and provide visible symbols of status that they can show to others. Principle 2: Triggers How do we remind people to talk about our products and ideas? Triggers are stimuli that prompt people to think about related things. Peanut butter reminds us of jelly and the word “dog” reminds us of the word “cat.” If you live in Philadelphia, seeing a cheesesteak might remind you of the hundred-dollar one at Barclay Prime. People often talk about whatever comes to mind, so the more often people think about a product or idea, the more it will be talked about. We need to design products and ideas that are frequently triggered by the environment and create new triggers by linking our products and ideas to prevalent cues in that environment. Top of mind leads to tip of tongue.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 22-23). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Principle 3: Emotion When we care, we share. So how can we craft messages and ideas that make people feel something? Naturally contagious content usually evokes some sort of emotion. Blending an iPhone is surprising. A potential tax hike is infuriating. Emotional things often get shared. So rather than harping on function, we need to focus on feelings. But as we’ll discuss, some emotions increase sharing, while others actually decrease it. So we need to pick the right emotions to evoke. We need to kindle the fire. Sometimes even negative emotions may be useful. Principle 4: Public Can people see when others are using our product or engaging in our desired behavior? The famous phrase “Monkey see, monkey do” captures more than just the human tendency to imitate. It also tells us that it’s hard to copy something you can’t see. Making things more observable makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular. So we need to make our products and ideas more public. We need to design products and initiatives that advertise themselves and create behavioral residue that sticks around even after people have bought the product or espoused the idea. Principle 5: Practical Value How can we craft content that seems useful? People like to help others, so if we can show them how our products or ideas will save time, improve health, or save money, they’ll spread the word. But given how inundated people are with information, we need to make our message stand out. We need to understand what makes something seem like a particularly good deal. We need to highlight the incredible value of what we offer— monetarily and otherwise. And we need to package our knowledge and expertise so that people can easily pass it on. Principle 6: Stories What broader narrative can we wrap our idea in? People don’t just share information, they tell stories. But just like the epic tale of the Trojan Horse, stories are vessels that carry things such as morals and lessons. Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter. So we need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell. But we need to do more than just tell a great story. We need to make virality valuable. We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 1: Social Currency How does it make people look to talk about a product or idea? Most people would rather look smart than dumb, rich than poor, and cool than geeky. Just like the clothes we wear and the cars we drive, what we talk about influences how others see us. It’s social currency. Knowing about cool things— like a blender that can tear through an iPhone— makes people seem sharp and in the know. So to get people talking we need to craft messages that help them achieve these desired impressions. We need to find our inner remarkability and make people feel like insiders. We need to leverage game mechanics to give people ways to achieve and provide visible symbols of status that they can show to others. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Social Currency..
  • Principle 2: Triggers How do we remind people to talk about our products and ideas? Triggers are stimuli that prompt people to think about related things. Peanut butter reminds us of jelly and the word “dog” reminds us of the word “cat.” If you live in Philadelphia, seeing a cheesesteak might remind you of the hundred-dollar one at Barclay Prime. People often talk about whatever comes to mind, so the more often people think about a product or idea, the more it will be talked about. We need to design products and ideas that are frequently triggered by the environment and create new triggers by linking our products and ideas to prevalent cues in that environment. Top of mind leads to tip of tongue. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 22-23). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Triggers can help products and ideas catch on, but some stimuli are better triggers than others. As we discussed, one key factor is how frequently the stimulus occurs. Hot chocolate would also have fitted really well with Kit Kat, and the sweet beverage might have even complemented the chocolate bar’s flavor better than coffee. But coffee is a more effective trigger because people think about and see it much more frequently. Most people drink hot chocolate only in the winter, while coffee is consumed year-round. Similarly, Michelob ran a successful campaign in the 1970s that linked weekends with the beer brand (“ Weekends are made for Michelob”). However, that wasn’t the slogan when the campaign started out. Originally the slogan was “Holidays are made for Michelob.” But this proved ineffective because the chosen stimuli— holidays— don’t happen that often. So Anheuser-Busch revised the slogan to “Weekends are made for Michelob,” which was much more successful. Frequency, however, must also be balanced with the strength of the link. The more things a given cue is associated with, the weaker any given association. It’s like poking a hole in the bottom of a paper cup filled with water. Triggers and cues lead people to talk, choose, and use. Social currency gets people talking, but Triggers keep them talking. Top of mind means tip of tongue.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 92). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 85-86). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Hashtags Name of group Wherever you are be there
  • Puppies, kittens, babies, sunsets....why are these things shared so much? But many times information is not enough. Most teens don’t smoke because they think it’s good for them. And most people who scarf down a Big Mac and large fries and wash it down with a supersized Coke are not oblivious to the health risks. So additional information probably won’t get them to change their behavior. They need something more. And that is where emotion comes in. Rather than harping on features or facts, we need to focus on feelings; the underlying emotions that motivate people to action.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 112-113). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Puppies, kittens, babies, sunsets....why are these things shared so much? But many times information is not enough. Most teens don’t smoke because they think it’s good for them. And most people who scarf down a Big Mac and large fries and wash it down with a supersized Coke are not oblivious to the health risks. So additional information probably won’t get them to change their behavior. They need something more. And that is where emotion comes in. Rather than harping on features or facts, we need to focus on feelings; the underlying emotions that motivate people to action.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 112-113). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Puppies, kittens, babies, sunsets....why are these things shared so much? But many times information is not enough. Most teens don’t smoke because they think it’s good for them. And most people who scarf down a Big Mac and large fries and wash it down with a supersized Coke are not oblivious to the health risks. So additional information probably won’t get them to change their behavior. They need something more. And that is where emotion comes in. Rather than harping on features or facts, we need to focus on feelings; the underlying emotions that motivate people to action.Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (pp. 112-113). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 4: Public Can people see when others are using our product or engaging in our desired behavior? The famous phrase “Monkey see, monkey do” captures more than just the human tendency to imitate. It also tells us that it’s hard to copy something you can’t see. Making things more observable makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular. So we need to make our products and ideas more public. We need to design products and initiatives that advertise themselves and create behavioral residue that sticks around even after people have bought the product or espoused the idea. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. .
  • Principle 5: Practical Value How can we craft content that seems useful? People like to help others, so if we can show them how our products or ideas will save time, improve health, or save money, they’ll spread the word. But given how inundated people are with information, we need to make our message stand out. We need to understand what makes something seem like a particularly good deal. We need to highlight the incredible value of what we offer— monetarily and otherwise. And we need to package our knowledge and expertise so that people can easily pass it on. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 6: Stories What broader narrative can we wrap our idea in? People don’t just share information, they tell stories. But just like the epic tale of the Trojan Horse, stories are vessels that carry things such as morals and lessons. Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter. So we need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell. But we need to do more than just tell a great story. We need to make virality valuable. We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Principle 6: Stories What broader narrative can we wrap our idea in? People don’t just share information, they tell stories. But just like the epic tale of the Trojan Horse, stories are vessels that carry things such as morals and lessons. Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter. So we need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell. But we need to do more than just tell a great story. We need to make virality valuable. We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 24). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.
  • Transcript of "Best Ways to Make Social Media…Social"

    1. 1. Best Ways to use Social Media And other things to know about Digital Media Little Rock Chapter of the Christian Writers Association Jeff Abramovitz, 2Degrees Media, Sept 2013 R U Social? R U Social?
    2. 2. My Story
    3. 3. LinkedIn/Facebook/Q&A What do I say in Social Media? Wheredo I belong in Social Media? Who do I target in Social Media? Why do I need Social Media?
    4. 4. By the numbers QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Socialnomics 2013 by Erik Qualman
    5. 5. Social Media is
    6. 6. Social Media is The role of social media is critical because it helps to spread cognitive dissonance by connecting thought leaders and activists to ordinary citizens rapidly expanding the network of people who become willing to take action. Simon Mainwaring
    7. 7. Social ‘ME’dia
    8. 8. You Must Answer This Who are you trying to reach? photo by Dieter Drescher
    9. 9. What do you have that they want? And This by Brian Solis, The End of Business as usual
    10. 10. from The End of Business as Usual by Brian Solis Brands are either part of the conversation or they’re not and as a result, they’re either part of the decision-making cycle or they’re absent from the heart, mind, and actions of the connected customer.
    11. 11. Data Avalanche
    12. 12. To understand the mindset of the connected consumer, one must realize that everything begins with search and intent
    13. 13. Why? Why do you exist? Write your mission statement? We exist to _______
    14. 14. Who do I target? Friends (easiest)Friends (easiest) Friends of FriendsFriends of Friends Similar InterestsSimilar Interests New Fans - Same ChannelsNew Fans - Same Channels New Fans - New Channels (Hardest)New Fans - New Channels (Hardest)
    15. 15. Who do I target? Friends (easiest)Friends (easiest) Friends of FriendsFriends of Friends Similar InterestsSimilar Interests New Fans - Same ChannelsNew Fans - Same Channels New Fans - New Channels (Hardest)New Fans - New Channels (Hardest)
    16. 16. Paid - Owned - Earned
    17. 17. Content Types
    18. 18. When is Junk Mail Not?
    19. 19. When Is Junk Content Not?
    20. 20. Be Remarkable
    21. 21. Who? Who are you writing to? Identify your audience persona -- My audience is _______?
    22. 22. The 5 C’s of Community Content Conversation Continuit y Commerc e Connecti on Relevance Value Incentives From Brian Solis, The End of Business as Usual Build communities that reflect CARE, CONCERN and SERVICE!
    23. 23. Where should you have presence Digital
    24. 24. Social Networks
    25. 25. What we usually see
    26. 26. Finding Your Niche
    27. 27. Where will you go?
    28. 28. Where? Where will you be available? I will focus learning and understanding the following platforms to begin/grow my social media following: __________________ __________________ __________________ by _____date_________
    29. 29. Social ToolsSocial Tools The Social Media Stool
    30. 30. What Works?
    31. 31. Content Good Content is: ASK Create Curate Share urposeRep
    32. 32. CUR-ATE TO CRE-ATE
    33. 33. Content that “sells”
    34. 34. Datanalysis = Content
    35. 35. able ? What makes content...
    36. 36. Shareability
    37. 37. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story *From the book, Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Jonah Berger Shareability
    38. 38. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    39. 39. People share things that make them look good to others. Berger, Jonah (2013-03-05). Contagious: Why Things Catch On (p. 33). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition. Shareability
    40. 40. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    41. 41. When I say “peanut butter”
    42. 42. What Kind of music?
    43. 43. Who drives this?
    44. 44. Who drives this?
    45. 45. #hashtag Name of group What are you known for? What is a trigger that already exists or that you can create? What are your triggers?
    46. 46. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    47. 47. What things elicit emotions? Share What Works
    48. 48. Shareability
    49. 49. Shareability
    50. 50. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    51. 51. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    52. 52. 1.Social Currency 2.Triggers 3.Emotion 4.Public 5.Practical Value 6.Story Shareability
    53. 53. Shareability
    54. 54. Facebook
    55. 55. Facebook Reasons why they “Unlike” you on Facebook:
    56. 56. Facebook
    57. 57. Facebook
    58. 58. Facebook
    59. 59. Twitter
    60. 60. Twitter
    61. 61. Twitter
    62. 62. LinkedIn Keys to a successful LinkedIn Presence: •Profile Completed with Keywords •Good Images for Profile Pers/Bus •Experience using Keywords •Group involvement •Regular sharing & Engagement •Apps Embedded •Jobs
    63. 63. LinkedIn
    64. 64. LinkedIn
    65. 65. Some Other ideas... •Internal sharing and support is crucial •Multiple authors for your organizations blog (B2B) •Keep each other accountable •Build your Email subscription list...THINK NAME ACQUISITION •Facebook Ads to grow your Facebook following •Write for others blogs (find influencers in your niche/space and start sharing content) •Consider content offerings; ebooks, whitepapers, slides, interviews on podcasts, videos, etc.
    66. 66. Some Other tools... -Twitter/Scheduling tools > Hootsuite > Sprout Social > Social Oomph > Buffer -Facebook Posting > Post Planner > Post Rocket > Pagemodo - Facebook Tabs/Apps/Cover > Heyo > FaceIt Pages > ShortStack > Pagemodo > Tabsite > High Impact Designer - Creative tools (for images/texts) > Snagit > Skitch > Picmonkey
    67. 67. Q&A
    68. 68. Thank you We are offering small businesses affordable, customized, professional looking websites for a fraction of the cost of other custom sites. We have a conference special through September. Save 20% on every package. Find out more at affordableaccountingsites.com
    69. 69. Thank you I provide coaching, training, strategic planning and execution of digital media for businesses, non profits and individuals. Let me help you today! www.2degreesmedia.com
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