Cornell Notesfor Ss
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Cornell Notesfor Ss

on

  • 2,271 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,271
Views on SlideShare
2,271
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • From Boch (2004): “The use of note taking to store transmitted information often over-shadows another important role—re.ection. Note taking is an effective infor-mation-processing tool that is commonly used both in daily life and in many professions (Hartley, 2002). As such, it contributes to the carrying out of a range of intellectual processes, such as making judgments, resolving issues, and making decisions. The taking of notes can aid time-consuming, real-time thought processes, such as the resolution of mathematical problems. In this respect, notes are similar to a rough draft in that they allow information to be coded, thereby relieving mnemonic processes and consequently helping with the development of the solution (Cary & Calson, 1999).” “ In general, students take notes in order to record information that they will need to learn at a later date. However, the result of taking notes is much more than the production of a passive “external” information store, as the note taking action itself is part of the memorization process and results in the cre-ation of a form of “internal” storage (Kiewra, 1987). Furthermore, the taking of notes seems to ease the load on the working memory and thereby helps people resolve complex problems.”
  • In class, you could use an overhead to take a class poll on how the opinions changed, or make a T-chart to document the evidence used in arguing for a change of opinion. The question could be your closure question/exit slip.
  • In class, you could use an overhead to take a class poll on how the opinions changed, or make a T-chart to document the evidence used in arguing for a change of opinion. The question could be your closure question/exit slip.

Cornell Notesfor Ss Cornell Notesfor Ss Presentation Transcript

  • Warm Up
    • Think about when you are in class listening to the teacher or reading the textbook. What kinds of things are you doing while the teacher is talking or while you or other students are reading?
    • Make a list on one of the Warm-Up Sheets at your table.
  • Note-taking and Cornell Notes Jennifer Krupala [email_address]
  • Cornell Notes
    • Why use it?
      • Used widely at colleges and universities
      • Direct correlation between note-taking and learning
      • Easy and efficient
    • Leonardo’s Example
    • 5 R’s of note taking: record, reduce, recite, reflect, review
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Activity One: Create a Cornell Note sheet
      • Take one of the sheets of notebook paper supplied at your table
      • Take the left hand side of paper and fold it over until the edge is at the center point of the paper
      • Unfold the paper and draw a line all the way across the paper horizontally, leaving 3 or four lines below the line.
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Activity One: Model it! Science Article Example
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Activity One: Take Notes
      • As the teacher reads, take notes in the right hand section of your paper.
      • Once they’ve finished reading, review the notes and reduce the facts into 3-5 main points in the left hand column.
      • Share your main points with your tablemates and come up with a 1-2 sentence summary.
      • Write the summary in the bottom section.
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Activity Two: Take Notes
      • Create a second Cornell Notes Sheet.
      • Get the photocopy of the textbook pages.
      • Follow along as we practice taking Cornell Notes while reading from the textbook.
      • Share your main points with your tablemates and come up with a 1-2 sentence summary.
      • Write the summary in the bottom section.
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Exit Activity: Reflect
      • At your table, discuss how you could use Cornell Notes in the following classes:
        • Social Studies
        • Language Arts
        • Science
        • Math
        • Electives
      • Complete the Exit slip on the back of the Warm up
  • Cornell Notes (cont.)
    • Examples in back of packet:
      • PDF version without lines, with lines, graph
      • Put questions/mental cues in cue column
      • Use the summary section for reflection
      • Have student fill in cue section/summary as homework
      • Review notes as a warm-up the next day – in a group – come to a consensus
  • Resources
    • www.eleven21.com/notetaker/ - downloadable Cornell Notes forms
    • www.wcupa.edu/_ACADEMICS/cae.tut/TCornell.htm - description of Cornell method and 5 R’s of Note Taking
    • www.englishcompanion.com/Tools/notemaking - lots of note taking forms with descriptions of what to write in each part
  • Da Vinci’s Notebook www.bl.uk/.../euromanuscripts/leonardolge.html