Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Inline Skating Program And Equipment Fundamentals
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Inline Skating Program And Equipment Fundamentals

  • 1,740 views
Published

Presentation I did at USARS Coaches Conference

Presentation I did at USARS Coaches Conference

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,740
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Inline Skating Program and Equipment Fundamentals By Joe Kaplenk jkaplenk@aol.com
  • 2. Agenda  Overview.  Where is Inline Figure Skating?  Fundamentals of Inline Figure Skates  Mounting an Inline Frame  Popular Inline Frame Manufacturers  Rinks  National Inline Competition and Seminar – “A Celebration of Inline Skating” Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 2
  • 3. Introduction  This presentation will focus some of the technical information needed to start an inline figure skating program.  The audience will have a better understanding of some of the technical issues with inline skating.  Discussion will be held on the relevant background and interests of coaches.  An invitational inline figure skating competition will be presented. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 3
  • 4. Overview  Inline Figure Skating, while using techniques similar to both ice and roller skating have differences that require some adjustment to teaching techniques  Inline Figure skating offers an opportunity to attract skaters to the sport that might not otherwise be attracted. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 4
  • 5. About the Presenter Joe Kaplenk  Current USARS registered coach and competitor.  Current accredited PSA and US Figure Skating coach and competitor.  Started roller skating while looking at adults in other sports.  Co-founder and President of Adult Skaters Forum, a national level non-profit organization of adult ice skaters.  Organized and chaired the first USFSA Adult Skaters Advisory Committee,  Chaired the first USFSA Ad-Hoc Adult Nationals Committee.  Registered local Data/Video Specialist U.S. Figure Skating  President - U.S Inline Figure Skating.  Sports video specialist in Dartfish.  B.S. Physics.  Professional computer consultant.  22 years part-time Computer Science Community College Instructor.  Author of two computer science textbooks and co-author of four others. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 5
  • 6. Research Goals Of This Project Research was done to determine:  The variety of characteristics of various inline figure skates  Which features and hardware might be attractive to certain kinds of skaters.  Determine the elements necessary for a coach to understand some of the basic equipment needs.  Understand where changes can be made to equipment to encourage more skaters.  Make recommendations for the development of an inline figure skating program. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 6
  • 7. Evaluation Criteria  This presentation is based on personal experience and that of other skaters and coaches.  This is intended to be a vendor neutral presentation.  Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect that of USARS or any other organization or individual.  Some ideas may be expressed as personal preferences and you are encouraged to evaluate equipment and share your experiences. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 7
  • 8. Current Status of Inline Figure Skating  Has seen growth for several years in other countries as reported by several vendors.  Has declined in numbers in the U.S.  The number of events in the U.S. has declined as the number of skaters competing has declined. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 8
  • 9. Where is Inline Figure Skating? Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 9
  • 10. Current Inline Events  World Class Inline Freeskating  Elementary Inline Creative Solo Free Dance  Open Inline Creative Solo Free Dance  All Dance Events – Skaters can compete on inlines with quads in the same dance event.  Precision Events – Can be mixed quad and inline skates. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 10
  • 11. Who Are The Inline Figure Skaters  Quad Figure Skaters  Ice Figure Skaters  Skaters that just want to do Inline Figure Skating Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 11
  • 12. Inline and Ice Figure Skating  Many ice coaches find that teaching inline figure skating is quite similar to teaching ice figure skating  Many high level ice skaters have found the transition to inline figure skates easy. This includes Michael Weiss, Brian Boitano and other Olympic caliber skaters.  Ice time is much more limited in other countries than in the U.S.  Inline Figure Skating is used as an alternative training experience due to the limited availability of ice in other countries.  A lot of Inline Figure Skating is done outdoors in other countries.  The Paris Open, an annual winter event, attracts ice skaters and coaches and uses ISU Figure Skating rules. It has been a growing event. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 12
  • 13. Opportunities to Attract Skaters  Inline Figure Skating offers an opportunity to attract skaters from other skating disciplines provided that: • Coaches understand the training requirements. • Equipment advances allow skaters to transition easily to the sport. • Skaters and coaches are willing to try them out. • Broad opportunities to train and compete are available. • Skaters and coaches from other disciplines are made aware of the opportunities. It is necessary to think outside the box and let them know. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 13
  • 14. Fundamentals of Inline Figure Skates Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 14
  • 15. Applying Weight to a Wheel As weight is added the wheel compresses Whether a wheel is compressed or not needs to be considered during inline skating. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 15
  • 16. Three vs Four Wheel – No Weight Three Wheel Rockered Frame - No Weight Four Wheel Rockered Frame - No Weight *Not drawn to scale Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 16
  • 17. Forward Skating  Occurs typically on the rear wheels of skates. (The heel of Three Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 2nd and 3rd wheels the boot)  The actual compression and weight distribution depends on the Four Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 2nd, 3rd and 4th Wheels skater’s weight and skill. Four Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 3rd and 4th wheel Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 17
  • 18. Backwards Skating  Occurs typically on Three Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 1st and 2nd Wheels the front wheels of skates. (The ball of the boot)  The actual compression and Four Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 1st, 2nd and 3rd Wheels weight distribution depends on the skater’s weight and skill. Four Wheel Rockered Frame - Weight on 1st and 2nd Wheels Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 18
  • 19. Three vs Four Wheel – Equally Weighted – Power Stroke The Amount of Compression of the wheels will vary depending on Three Wheel Rockered Frame the skill and weight of skater and wheel hardness Four Wheel Rockered Frame *Not drawn to scale Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 19
  • 20. Rockering  Allows a frame to have more than two wheels on the frame, but only have two wheels make contact at one time.  The ideal situation would be to have many very small wheels so there is a constant curve as is done on ice.  Larger wheels means fewer wheels or a longer frame. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 20
  • 21. Why Rockering is Important Front Wheels on Track Center Wheels on Track Rear Wheels on Track Wheels pointed at are not straight on a circular path Like a car skidding around a turn Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 21
  • 22. Path of Non-rockered Wheels This gives more detail of the third wheel going sideways. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 22
  • 23. Height and Rockering Adjustment  The amount of rockering can be adjusted by: • A frame with a center height adjustment. • A larger wheel in the middle compared to the end wheels. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 23
  • 24. Three Turns  Because of the nature of the wheels and balance I’ve found that three- turns for the lower level of skater have the following order of difficulties: • Ice – very narrow point of contact because of the rockering of the blade makes a three-turn easiest of the three. • Inline – a longer wheelbase makes a more stable platform. Less floor contact than quads and hence less resistance means that three turns on inlines might be introduced earlier in a skaters career than perhaps commonly thought. Two wheels are typically in contact at one time with less surface area than quad wheels. • Quad – there are typically four points of contact for the skate with the floor, and the need to slide the rear wheels around making a larger surface area of contact. There is also a tendency for skaters to fall forwards. Without toe stops this can lead to a face plant. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 24
  • 25. Three Turns on Inlines The weight shifts from the  A properly rear wheels to the executed front wheels. three-turn only The middle has two wheels wheel in this on the floor at drawing rotates one time. about a point. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 25
  • 26. Mounting an Inline Frame Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 26
  • 27. Importance of Proper Left to Right Balance  The basics and issues of mounting inline blades is basically the same as the mounting of ice figure skating blades.  Mounting can be done by a qualified ice skating boot and blade specialist as well as a roller rink. My experience is that both ice and and quad specialists are often eager to try something new in mounting these frames.  Improper balancing of inline figure skating blades can lead to difficulties in skating, particularly in properly balancing on spins as well as landing jumps squarely. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 27
  • 28. Left to Right Improper Balance • Inline skaters may have problems of being too much on the inside or outside edges of the skates. • Improper mounting of blades can also have the same impact. • Correct Position is shown in the middle Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 28
  • 29. Left to Right Balance – Skater Adjustment  The skaters weight distribution and skills may require that the frames be mounted further to the inside or outside.  You can test this by having the skater skate a straight line on one foot.  But only adjust Weight on Inside Weight on Outside after some analysis!  Don’t compensate Frames Needs to Be Frames Needs to Be for bad habits.! Set Closer Together Set Further Apart Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 29
  • 30. Length  Many skaters and coaches prefer the three wheel frames because they are shorter as well as being lighter. This prevents the heels from interfering with each other and may be considered more maneuverable.  Dancers and Precision Team/Synchro skaters prefer the shorter frames for the same reason.  Ice freestyle skaters may have fewer problems with longer frames because ice blades are longer. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 30
  • 31. Bearings  ABEC value doesn’t really matter unless you are skating around 200 mph.  What matters is the quality of the bearings.  Swiss bearings are often mentioned as being the best quality. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 31
  • 32. Outdoor Wheels  The following list is based on recommendations from other skaters: • Speedmax – 90A hardness seems to be popular • “Red Star Rocket 86A red, 76mm. I used a similar Red Star in the past (it was 84A, not the Rocket) and I was very favourably impressed by the good response and a more-than-acceptable wear down. • Hyper Pro 250 84A (orange, the yellows are 82A), 72mm and 76mm, round profile (larger than Spirals/SpeedMax), very long lifetime, good edging but a bit slow. Sometimes good deals on eBay, sometimes not. • Kryptonics Power Play 84A black, 72mm and 76mm, round profile. I've not used them, but I know they are considered of very good quality • Revision Ghost "The Axis" 84A, 72mm and 76mm, round profile. The small core should allow good edging. • Rink Rat World Cup 84A outdoor, 72mm and 76mm. This is the only outdoor wheel made by Rink Rat.” • Recommendations by tguido56 on Skatelog Posting Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 32
  • 33. Popular Inline Frame Manufacturers Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 33
  • 34. Choosing an Inline Frame  The technology has changed over the last 10 years and is still changing.  There are a wide variety of different frame designs available.  Not all frames will work the same for an individual skater.  Inline frames and ice blades tend to use similar designs and meet similar issues.  A coach should have as wide a possible exposure to inline frames, equipment and teaching technique differences in order to understand how to best match the frame to a skater.  Heavier skaters may require a four wheel frame, adjustable middle wheel, or varying sizes or hardness of wheels in order to achieve the best skating experience.  Standard manufacturer listed lengths may not work best with all skaters. Some skaters from other disciplines may prefer longer frames. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 34
  • 35. Snow White  Rockered Wheel Alignment  Fixed Height Middle Wheel  Adjustable Height Toe Stop  Offset Center Wheel – Closer to front than back wheel. A 40/60 ratio.  http://www.inlinefigure.com/ Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 35
  • 36. Snow White Cont.  SW2 • Released at Worlds 2008 • 9 sizes of frames • 15% lighter only 750 grams. • Built-in bearing bushings. • Price-competitive. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 36
  • 37. Snow White Video • An example of the constant improvement in the technology • Click on the picture to play the video Video provided by Snow White Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 37
  • 38. PIC  Four Wheels – Front and Back wheels are higher off the ground than the middle two wheels – rockered.  Toe stop is not adjustable. But can be cut down for some finer adjustment.  Was designed to emulate an ice blade and in cooperation with several ice coaches. Most popular inline figure skate blade at last PSA coaches conference in an informal survey.  Longer than other inline figure skate frames and so some skaters may find the heels touch each other on some moves. But some skaters may like the longer length and feel more stable on them.  www.picskate.com. Photo from PIC Website Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 38
  • 39. PIC continued  PIC has released a newer four-wheel frame in the last few years that is a noticeable improvement over the earlier design including better quality toe stops.  PIC will shortly be releasing a P-3 that has: • Three wheels • A newly designed multi-layer wheel that claims better response in jumps and edge control. • Maintains the same turn radius as the standard PIC frame • Will be less expensive than other frames.  I’ve found three-turns easier on PIC frames, perhaps because of my ice background and the intent to make it perform like an ice blade. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 39
  • 40. PIC Video  A Video that shows how similar ice and inline skating is and how it can be used to attract skaters.  The_Pic_Skate_1_1.f4v  The web location is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvG7cb71nZY Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 40
  • 41. Custom Inlines  Rockered Wheel Alignment  Adjustable Height Middle Wheel  Adjustable Height Toe Stop  Offset Center Wheel – Closer to front than back wheel. Picture from Custom Inline http://www.custominlines.com/ Website Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 41
  • 42. Custom Inlines cont.  V2 • Recent design • 18% lighter than previous version. • Higher rebound material than earlier version. Pictures from Custom Inlines website Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 42
  • 43. Triax by Snyder  Not rockered.  Can use different size wheels to get rockering.  Supposed to be easier for quad skaters than ice skaters. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 43
  • 44. Rinks Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 44
  • 45. Where to Skate  Roller Rinks  Gyms – more popular in rural areas and other countries.  Outdoors – more popular in warms areas and other countries – particular for ice skaters looking for alternative training locations. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 45
  • 46. Floor Surface Coatings  Coatings – Various coatings have different characteristics for indoor and outdoor skating. Some coatings require a base or multiple base coatings as well as a surface coat or coatings. Examples Roll-on, Nova Play, Dura Seal, Tite Coat, Valspar, Rink Cote, TITE-Tanium Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 46
  • 47. Interlocking Plastic or Similar Material Tile Surfaces  In my experience: • They are relatively poor surfaces because they are relatively slippery compared to wood floors. • Inline figure skaters require some time to be spent on one foot and this doesn’t work well on these kind of surfaces. • Hockey players often have to use super-grip type wheels to prevent the slippage. These wheels don’t seem to help figure skaters.  I’ve found two different types of surfaces. • Smooth or relatively smooth rubber-type surfaces – Are very poor surfaces for inline figure skating because they have too much slippage – Examples include Sport Court • Web surface – very poor for inline skating and hockey because the skates tend to slip very easily and a skater needs to be on two feet. An example is Spider Court which has a web type surface and is great for outdoor surfaces due to its low maintenance, but it quite slippery even for hockey players. The plastic like material tends to crack over time and break-up Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 47
  • 48. National Inline Competition and Seminar “A Celebration of Inline Skating” Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 48
  • 49. Useful Example: Starting a National Event on Ice - Adults  In the early nineties, adult ice figure skating, except for dance, had one or two events for a whole range of skills.  One adult male competed in Regionals in Freeskating in the whole Midwest Section. 12 adults competed in the whole country in the first year of Adults in Regionals.  A recent Adult Nationals competition had over 500 adults and continues an overall growth. But adults don’t typically compete locally.  A key component was the support of coaches, the involvement of the skaters and the support of the organization as well as the realization that change was necessary.  It was also realized that Adult Figure Skating needed to be approached on a national level with a national level event open as much as possible to all skaters, at least initially. Eventually test requirements and Regionals/Sectionals would be developed if needed.  Test requirements and a Sectionals for popular events were added. Other adults go straight to Nationals with no Regionals. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 49
  • 50. Open Inline National-level Invitational  Goals: • Create a national level invitational open competition on inline figure skating that is also fun, a draw and team-based. • It would be moved around the country. • Not USARS sponsored, but USARS- sanctioned (Information to be completed by early January). • Any profits would go to advancing inline figure skating and skaters. • Attract skaters and coaches from all venues of skating. • Proposed name is U.S. Open Inline Chicago 2009 to emphasize inclusion of not only figure skating events, but also basic skating skills. • “Think Globally, Act Locally” a lot emphasis will be placed on attracting local skaters and beginners as well as high-level skaters from everywhere. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 50
  • 51. Competition Events  All current USARS inline-only figure skating events.  Some USARS events that allow mixed quad and inlines.  Events that are currently quad-only but will be allowed to be skated on inlines for this event.  Selected events from other skating venues, particularly those for beginners and that are family oriented.  Spotlight and dramatic skating events like at the Gold Skate and prop events.  Exhibitions for visiting skaters not wishing to compete.  Events requiring no special program or preparation such as individual elements like jumps, spins, or moves, etc.  Other custom designed events. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 51
  • 52. Location and Dates  Events: Saturday - May 2, 2009 • USA Skate Center Romeoville, IL. • Alternative or additional location: Edge Arena, Bensenville, IL.  Seminar: Friday, May 1 – Sunday, May 3 – Scheduled at Bensenville, Il at Edge Arena*, (length dependent on speakers)  Speakers: • Nick Perna, Prominent in the development of the original PIC skate. – various topics on inline figure skating. • Garrett Krug, National-level skating and physical sports trainer to Olympic caliber skaters– discussion of off-skate training techniques • Joe Kaplenk, topic: “Sports Video Analysis using latest technology” et. al. • Looking for additional speakers and demonstrators. Please volunteer. *(Home of the Chicagos.Blackhawks, State Wars on inlines, site of ISI Worlds 2007, 2007 U. S. Figure Skating Adult Nationals, 2008 PSA Conference). Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 52
  • 53. Volunteers Needed For the Event Needed: Coaches Judges Officials Skaters Speakers Spectators Sponsors Supporters Vendors Volunteers Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 53
  • 54. Open Inline Competition Committee  Joe Kaplenk, Chair, 708-707-0992, jkaplenk@aol.com  Mary Lu Wehmeier, Meet Director mwehmeier@gmail.com, home phone 909-860-2494.  Rhonda Arena, bondmovies@yahoo.com  Others to be added  Other skaters and coaches are welcome to help with the planning on the committee and the event.  Contact one of the committee members to volunteer. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 54
  • 55. Further Thoughts  Join us for a discussion about inline figure skating after this presentation Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 55
  • 56. Summary Everyone Skates No One Waits! -Joe Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 56
  • 57. Where to Get More Information  www.skatelog.com for great discussion.  Competition website - We will be putting up a website after the first of the year with info on the competition. Keep in touch and watch skatelog.com for details.  Watch for mailings  Send an email to jkaplenk@aol.com to be added to the competition mailing list.  Send me an email for an updated copy of this presentation. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 57
  • 58. Dec. 5, 2008 Copyright 2008 - Joe Kaplenk 58