John Segota, CAE
Assoc. Exec. Dir. for Public Policy & Professional Relations
TESOL International Association
David Mamet
2 

“Do not internalize the industrial
model. You are not one of the myriad
interchangeable pieces, but a uniq...
What is advocacy?
3 

According to Merriam-Webster:
•  An active verbal support for a cause
or position.
•  The act of adv...
Why advocacy?
4 

•  TESOL P-12 Professional Teaching
Standards
– Domain	
  5:	
  Professionalism	
  
•  5.a	
  –	
  ESL	
...
Types of advocacy
5 

•  Self advocacy
•  Case/personal advocacy
•  Cause/public/issue advocacy
UNICEF	
  Unite	
  for	
  ...
Framework of advocacy
6 

•  Educate
•  Organize
•  Activate
Framework of advocacy for ELLs
7 

•  Currency
•  Defensibility
•  Futurity
Herrera & Murry (1999)
Knowledge is credibility
8 

•  Facts – focus - issues
•  Policies & procedures
•  Options
•  Document
Issues
9 

•  What are the issues at your school?
•  What are the issues in your
community?
•  What is happening at the st...
Rights
10 

•  Laws – Local, State, Federal
•  Contracts
•  Rules & Policies
•  Preferences & Social Expectations
Understanding the wider context
11 

ELL	
  EducaDon	
  
Nega4ve	
  forces	
  
Posi4ve	
  forces	
  
Understanding the root causes
12 

No	
  ESL	
  instrucDon	
  
Networks
13 

•  Who do I know? 
– Personal	
  networks	
  
– Professional	
  networks	
  
•  What resources do

they have...
Networks
14 

Self	
  
Stakeholders
15 

•  Group 1 – Directly impacted
•  Group 2 – Decision makers
•  Group 3 – Local groups
•  Group 4 – Natio...
How many Fs?
16 

Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types
of dispositions are forever forming associati...
How many Fs?
17 

Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types
of dispositions are forever forming associati...
Advocacy Road Map
18 

1.  Current Challenge – Section A
– What	
  is	
  your	
  reality?	
  
– What	
  is	
  your	
  prob...
Advocacy Road Map
19 

3. Root of the problem – Section B
– What	
  creates	
  your	
  problems?	
  
– Who	
  is	
  respon...
Advocacy Road Map
20 

6. How to achieve it – Section C
– How	
  will	
  you	
  bridge	
  the	
  two	
  sides?	
  
– What	...
Dr. Haim Ginott
21 

"I've come to a frightening conclusion that I am
the decisive element in the classroom. It's my
perso...
More information
22 

http://www.slideshare.net

@JohnSegota

jsegota@tesol.org
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Advancing Teacher Leadership Through Advocacy - July 2013

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Advocacy for students and teachers is an important aspect of English language teaching. How can teachers advance their leadership skills through advocacy? Workshop presentation to the University of Alabama Birmingham School of Education ESL program.

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Advancing Teacher Leadership Through Advocacy - July 2013

  1. 1. John Segota, CAE Assoc. Exec. Dir. for Public Policy & Professional Relations TESOL International Association
  2. 2. David Mamet 2 “Do not internalize the industrial model. You are not one of the myriad interchangeable pieces, but a unique human being, and if you’ve got something to say, say it, and think well of yourself while your learning to say it better.”
  3. 3. What is advocacy? 3 According to Merriam-Webster: •  An active verbal support for a cause or position. •  The act of advocating, or speaking or writing, in support (of something).
  4. 4. Why advocacy? 4 •  TESOL P-12 Professional Teaching Standards – Domain  5:  Professionalism   •  5.a  –  ESL  Research  &  History   •  5.b  –  Professional  Development,  Partnerships,   and  Advocacy   •  NBPTS ENL Standards – IX  –  Professional  Leadership  &  Advocacy  
  5. 5. Types of advocacy 5 •  Self advocacy •  Case/personal advocacy •  Cause/public/issue advocacy UNICEF  Unite  for  Children    
  6. 6. Framework of advocacy 6 •  Educate •  Organize •  Activate
  7. 7. Framework of advocacy for ELLs 7 •  Currency •  Defensibility •  Futurity Herrera & Murry (1999)
  8. 8. Knowledge is credibility 8 •  Facts – focus - issues •  Policies & procedures •  Options •  Document
  9. 9. Issues 9 •  What are the issues at your school? •  What are the issues in your community? •  What is happening at the state level that might affect your students? •  What is happening nationally that may affect your students?
  10. 10. Rights 10 •  Laws – Local, State, Federal •  Contracts •  Rules & Policies •  Preferences & Social Expectations
  11. 11. Understanding the wider context 11 ELL  EducaDon   Nega4ve  forces   Posi4ve  forces  
  12. 12. Understanding the root causes 12 No  ESL  instrucDon  
  13. 13. Networks 13 •  Who do I know? – Personal  networks   – Professional  networks   •  What resources do
 they have? •  Who do they know?
  14. 14. Networks 14 Self  
  15. 15. Stakeholders 15 •  Group 1 – Directly impacted •  Group 2 – Decision makers •  Group 3 – Local groups •  Group 4 – National / International groups
  16. 16. How many Fs? 16 Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types of dispositions are forever forming associations. They are not only commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but others of a thousand different types – religious, moral, serious, futile, very general and very limited, immensely large and immensely minute. Americans combine to give fetes, found seminaries, build churches, distribute books, and send missionaries to the antipodes. Hospitals, prisons, and schools take shape in that way. Finally, if they want to proclaim a truth or propagate some feeling by the encouragement of a great example, they form an association.
  17. 17. How many Fs? 17 Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types of dispositions are forever forming associations. They are not only commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but others of a thousand different types – religious, moral, serious, futile, very general and very limited, immensely large and immensely minute. Americans combine to give fetes, found seminaries, build churches, distribute books, and send missionaries to the antipodes. Hospitals, prisons, and schools take shape in that way. Finally, if they want to proclaim a truth or propagate some feeling by the encouragement of a great example, they form an association.
  18. 18. Advocacy Road Map 18 1.  Current Challenge – Section A – What  is  your  reality?   – What  is  your  problem?   – What  is  happening?   2.  Ideal Solution – Section E – What  does  the  future  look  like?   – What  is  your  vision?   – Where  do  you  want  to  go?  
  19. 19. Advocacy Road Map 19 3. Root of the problem – Section B – What  creates  your  problems?   – Who  is  responsible?   – Why  is  it  happening?   4. Enablers of the future – Section D – What  will  help  you  reach  your  goals?   – What  needs  to  happen?   – What  tools  or  strategies  will  help?  
  20. 20. Advocacy Road Map 20 6. How to achieve it – Section C – How  will  you  bridge  the  two  sides?   – What  needs  to  be  done  to  get  from  one   point  to  the  other?  
  21. 21. Dr. Haim Ginott 21 "I've come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It's my personal approach that creates the climate. It's my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. … In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de- escalated and a child is humanized or dehumanized.”
  22. 22. More information 22 http://www.slideshare.net @JohnSegota jsegota@tesol.org

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