Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Business -- Now
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Business -- Now

781

Published on

The presentation highlights some trends of today's business and discusses their implications to information technology. The Agenda (2001) by Michael Hammer is reviewed in the light of recent …

The presentation highlights some trends of today's business and discusses their implications to information technology. The Agenda (2001) by Michael Hammer is reviewed in the light of recent developments in business and IT.

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
781
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Today’s business is unprecedentedly fast-paced. In the world of the consumers’ market, new products and services need to be rolled out to market more and more rapidly. Faster business cycles propagate through the entire value chain: planning, forecasting, and replenishment need to be event-driven, just-in-time and on-demand.
  • Products and services are becoming commodities; they are difficult to be differentiated in functionality and performance. Also, information about products and prices are transparent. Other factors such as quality, reliability, convenience and customization determine what the consumers buy.
  • Customers in both business and consumer markets are also looking for total solutions. Companies must provide their customers with processes bundling products and services into total offerings. The market leaders of today are systematically digitizing these processes and executing them according to their customers’ immediate priorities.
  • Trade barriers between nations and regions are being dismantled, while the Internet shrinks time and space of the business environment. Companies have to compete in an essentially global market place.
  • Companies are looking for economies of scale while concentrating on their core competencies. Virtual organizations and extended value chains are becoming the unit of competition. Consolidation and outsourcing call for means to integrate companies intra- and inter-enterprise.
  • Traditionally, big has meant economies of scale. Value was added with efficient manufacturing, widespread distribution, a huge sales force and very large R&D staffs. In the wake of the Internet, however, small has become the new big, as Seth Godin puts it. Little companies often make more money than the big ones. Small means agility, it gives the flexibility to change the business model as needed.Small means authenticity that promotes trust. Small means faster decision-making. Small means more personal customer service.
  • Run your business for your customers Become ETDBWGive your customers what they really wantDeliver MVAPut processes first Make high performance possibleCreate order where chaos reigns Systematize creativityMeasure like you mean it Make measuring part of managing, not accountingManage without structure Profit from the power of ambiguityFocus on the final customer Turn distribution chains into distribution communitiesKnock down your outer walls Collaborate wherever you canExtend your enterprise Integrate virtually, not vertically
  • Transcript

    • 1. www.requisiteremedy.com
      Business. Now.
    • 2. BusinessTrends
    • 3. ShrinkingBusinessCycles
    • 4. Commoditization of Products and Services
    • 5. Total Products and Services
    • 6. Time and Space Contraction
    • 7. Consolidation/Outsourcing
    • 8. Small is the new Big
    • 9. Hammer (2001):The Agenda
      Run your business for your customers
      Give your customers what they really want
      Put processes first
      Create order where chaos reigns
      Measure like you mean it
      Manage without structure
      Focus on the final customer
      Knock down your outer walls
      Extend your enterprise
    • 10. 1. Become an ETDBW
    • 11. Moments of Truth
    • 12. 2. Give your customers
      what they really want
    • 13. 3. Put Processes First
    • 14. “Process is the Clark Kent of business ideas.”
    • 15. 4.
      Certaeodrerwrehecaohsrgneis
    • 16. 5. Measure Like You Mean It
    • 17. 6. Managewithoutstructure
    • 18. 7. Focus on the final customer
    • 19. Markets are Conversations − Again
    • 20.
    • 21. 8. Knock down your outer walls
    • 22. 9. Extend your enterprise
    • 23. production
      economy
      quality and mass
      marketing economy
      customer service and
      niche marketing economy
      distribution and
      sales-driven economy
      ‘customers of one’
      economy
      1950
      1960
      1970
      1980
      1990
      2000
    • 24. “In times of fundamental change, the riskiest strategy is not to act boldly but to continue in the old ways. That is guaranteed to lead you to failure. If you act, you at least have a chance.”

    ×