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  • 1. REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES AQUING BICOLNON,INC. With the support and cooperation of: R egional I ntegrated Y outh D evelopment P lan 2008-2013 Regional Integrated Youth Development Council and the creation of
  • 2. Overview [Filipino Youth]…. YOUTH 15-30 years old 29 Million in 2007 “… is a critical period in a person’s growth and development from the onset of adolescence towards the peak of mature, self-reliant and responsible adulthood comprising the considerable sector of the population from the age of fifteen (15) to thirty (30) years.”
  • 3. PHILIPPINE YOUTH POPULATION Source: National Statistics Office (NSO) 2008-projected Philippine Population : 90.1 Million 2008-projected Philippine Youth Population : 30 Million : 1/3 of population
  • 4. SOCIAL &amp; ECONOMIC SITUATION OF THE FILIPINO YOUTH <ul><li>Population (2007): 29,229,623 ; 33% of the Philippine population of 88,574,614 </li></ul><ul><li>Youth population: highest in Luzon areas: Southern Tagalog; NCR; Central Luzon </li></ul><ul><li>Vision, interest &amp; priority: studies, work and family. Community and national welfare is least mentioned. </li></ul><ul><li>15-17 year olds: Education-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>18-24: Job-oriented; some health risk concerns </li></ul><ul><li>25-30: Family; conscious of role in community &amp; nation-building </li></ul>Source: National Statistics Office (NSO)
  • 5. <ul><li>R egional </li></ul><ul><li>I ntegrated </li></ul><ul><li>Y outh </li></ul><ul><li>D evelopment </li></ul><ul><li>P lan 2008-2013 </li></ul><ul><li>(for Bicol Region) </li></ul>
  • 6. <ul><li>5 youth subgroups : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In-School Youth (ISY) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Out-of-School Youth (OSY) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working Youth (WY) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth with Special Needs (YSN) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>employment/Livelihood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>values/participation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>health </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>peace &amp; order </li></ul></ul>Aquing Bicolnon,Inc. Regional Integrated Youth Development Plan (AB-RIYDP) 2008-2013 Major Areas of Concern:
  • 7. Major Issues: <ul><li>Providing alternative education </li></ul><ul><li>Mobilizing youth in the preservation and </li></ul><ul><li>protection of the environment </li></ul><ul><li>Youth unemployment/underemployment </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative livelihood opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening participation of youth </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting adolescent health </li></ul><ul><li>Access to quality education </li></ul>
  • 8. AB-RIYDP TEN-POINT YOUTH POLICY AGENDA
  • 9. AB-RIYDP TEN-POINT YOUTH POLICY AGENDA <ul><li>Enable youth access to quality &amp; responsive education at all levels in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Develop globally competitive youth </li></ul><ul><li>Decrease youth unemployment &amp; underemployment in Bicol Region </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent the exploitation of young workers &amp; working children in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure the acceptability, accessibility, availability &amp; affordability of culturally &amp; gender-sensitive/responsive &amp; user-friendly health services for adolescents and youth, particularly with regard to adolescent health &amp; youth development particularly the Aquing Bicolnon </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce the incidence of risk behaviors among Aquing Bicolnon or the Bicolano-Youth </li></ul>
  • 10. <ul><li>Strengthen youth participation in community &amp; youth development activities in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate the youth agenda &amp; concerns in local &amp; national development plans </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate all forms of discrimination &amp; abuse against youth in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Promote a positive &amp; healthy self-image, critical thinking, love of country, social responsibility, &amp; the spirit of volunteerism among the Aquing Bicolnon or Bicolano-Youth </li></ul>AB-RIYDP TEN-POINT YOUTH POLICY AGENDA
  • 11. BICOL YOUTH CONGRESS May 27-30, 2008 Sorsogon State College, Sorsogon City
  • 12. A 4-day Youth Congress in Bicol Region which formulated and addressed the mounting concerns of the youth-- the Out of School Youth ( OSY), Working Youth (WY), In-School Youth (ISY), Youth With Special Needs (YWSN), and the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK )-- by providing the proper venue in which concerns and issues facing them has been voiced out and will soon be given to the government for action. It also promoted a mentality among the youth of they being active subjects in their advancement--that the sub-sectors have the capabilities within their ranks to positively affect issues and concerns. The drafting of the Regional Integrated Youth Development Plan (RIYDP): 2008-2013 for Bicol Region and the creation/establishment of the Regional Integrated Youth Development Council which serves as the implementing body of the RIYDP 2008-2013.
  • 13. &nbsp;
  • 14. &nbsp;
  • 15. &nbsp;
  • 16. &nbsp;
  • 17. &nbsp;
  • 18. Message
  • 19. &nbsp;
  • 20. &nbsp;
  • 21. &nbsp;
  • 22. &nbsp;
  • 23. &nbsp;
  • 24. &nbsp;
  • 25. SOCIAL &amp; ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS PARTICIPATION INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES ISSUES &amp; CONCERNS YOUTH (5 SUB-SECTORS: ISY,OSY,WY,YSN&amp;SK) YOUTH ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK
  • 26. PROJECT AREAS 11 Catanduanes 19 Camarines Sur 12 Camarines Norte 15 Albay No. of Municipalities Province Masbate 19 Sorsogon 14 No. of Cities 3 2 1 1
  • 27. 3,471 No. of barangays 7 107 No. of cities No. of municipalities 6 No. of provinces Project Areas Geographical Area
  • 28. TOTAL NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS 63 WORKING YOUTH 40 YOUTH WITH SPECIAL NEEDS 112 OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH 123 IN-SCHOOL YOUTH Number Participants SANGGUNIANG KABATAAN 103
  • 29. WHAT IS THE AQUING BICOLNON-REGIONAL INTEGRATED YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PLAN? <ul><li>A GUIDING FRAMEWORK for a UNIFIED ACTION among youth who belong to the marginalized sub-sectors: In-School, Out-of-School, Working, Youth with Special Needs &amp; Sangguniang Kabataan in Bicol Region… </li></ul><ul><li>In the pursuit of YOUTH DEVELOPMENT &amp; EMPOWERMENT goals… </li></ul><ul><li>Predicated on a common appreciation &amp; understanding of YOUTH ISSUES &amp; CONCERNS… </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of one’s ROLES &amp; RESPONSIBILITIES to carry out meaningful interventions for youth </li></ul>
  • 30. AB-RIYDP 2008-2013 FORMULATION PROCESS YOUTH ASSESSMENT RESULTS Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. Consultation National Youth Situationers Regional Youth Situationers <ul><li>To validate results </li></ul><ul><li>To generate </li></ul><ul><li>implications &amp; </li></ul><ul><li>recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Thrusts </li></ul><ul><li>Approaches </li></ul><ul><li>&amp; Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring &amp; </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Indicators </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing </li></ul><ul><li>Schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Regional/Local </li></ul><ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Guide </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>&amp; Evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Scheme </li></ul>AB-RIYDP
  • 31. <ul><li>Summary profile of Filipino Youth &amp; Region 5 Youth Situationers </li></ul><ul><li>Overview of Aquing Bicolnon youth issues, concerns &amp; needs </li></ul><ul><li>Policy thrusts to address these needs </li></ul><ul><li>Goals, strategies &amp; activities to fulfill the policy thrusts </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation &amp; localization guide </li></ul><ul><li>Indicators for monitoring progress &amp; evaluating/measuring success of AB-RIYDP 2008-2013 implementation </li></ul>AB-RIYDP CONTENTS
  • 32. SOCIAL &amp; ECONOMIC SITUATION OF THE AQUING BICOLNON OR BICOLANO YOUTH <ul><li>Population (2007): 5,109,798 </li></ul><ul><li>Youth population: 1,807,266 </li></ul><ul><li>Highest in Region V areas: Albay– almost 400,00 youth out of 1,190,823 </li></ul><ul><li>Vision, interest &amp; priority: studies, work and family. Community and national welfare is least mentioned. </li></ul><ul><li>Studies, work and family. Community and national welfare is least mentioned. </li></ul><ul><li>15-17 year olds: Education-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>18-24: Job-oriented; some health risk concerns </li></ul><ul><li>25-30: Family; conscious of role in community &amp; nation-building </li></ul>
  • 33. <ul><li>Value: presence &amp; role of FAMILY </li></ul><ul><li>Out-of-School Youth (OSY) </li></ul><ul><li>Sub-Sectors: </li></ul><ul><li>In-School Youth (ISY) </li></ul><ul><li>Youth with Special Needs (YSN) </li></ul><ul><li>Working Youth (WY) </li></ul><ul><li>Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) </li></ul>
  • 34. <ul><li>Dominant issues: </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Employment </li></ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Health risk behaviors </li></ul>
  • 35. AQUING BICOLNON,INC. <ul><li>Regional Integrated YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PLAN MATRIX </li></ul>
  • 36. IN-SCHOOL YOUTH
  • 37. <ul><li>In-School Youth </li></ul>Definition: 15 – 30 years old Attending either formal school system or non-school based educational program School Year 2006 - 2007
  • 38. <ul><li>Trend </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing school participation of students </li></ul><ul><li>establishment of additional schools </li></ul><ul><li>improved resource allocation for the educational sector </li></ul><ul><li>passage of landmark laws and legislation affecting the in-school youth </li></ul>Upside: <ul><li>lack of improvement in the performance indicators of basic education </li></ul><ul><li>low success rate in professional examinations </li></ul><ul><li>a still inadequate number of secondary and tertiary schools </li></ul><ul><li>increasing proportion of educated among the unemployed </li></ul>Downside:
  • 39. <ul><li>ISSUES ON EDUCATION </li></ul>
  • 40. In Education <ul><li>3 pass licensure exam </li></ul>7 take licensure exam 1 is employed 12 graduate in tertiary education 21 enroll in tertiary education 40 graduate in Secondary Education 90 enroll in Grade 1 100 school age kids
  • 41. <ul><li>High incidence of drop-outs among male youth (more females than males finish school) </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict relations between the school administration and the studentry. </li></ul><ul><li>Unaffordable tuition fee and quality education and lack of educational facilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Unjustified collection of other fees. </li></ul><ul><li>High incidents of forced relationship between educators and students in exchange of educational favor. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access to tertiary (college) education </li></ul><ul><li>Oversupply of college graduates: 15% of current jobs require higher education </li></ul><ul><li>Mismatch between schooling content/ curriculum and job requirements </li></ul>Identified Gaps:
  • 42. Strategy: <ul><li>Increase the number of scholarship grants to poor but deserving students. </li></ul><ul><li>Create and establish a more clear and comprehensive policy on administration-studentry relationship. </li></ul><ul><li>Strict compliance of accreditation requirements by the school before availing the labeling certificate. </li></ul><ul><li>Clear and Transparent policy before the collection of any fees chargeable against the students. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase punishment against the violators who found to be guilty of committing forced relationship with the students in exchange of educational favors. </li></ul>
  • 43. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Lobby before the congress to allocate funds either from the congressional development funds or through a legislation to increase the number of scholarship grants; and network with local and foreign institutions to support the programs for the poor but deserving students. </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen the implementation of the approved student-administration manual for the welfare of both institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct surprise visits to the schools or institutions to determine the actual condition of their facilities and services. </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise public hearings duly represented by the school administration and the students before the imposition of any collection. Institutionalize a yearly conduct of student congress and for the establishment of a Youth Center in every school in Bicol that will serve as a venue for youth activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Intensive information dissemination on the proper and appropriate code of conduct by the educators with regard to dealing with the students . </li></ul>
  • 44. Output : <ul><li>At least 20% from the previous number of drop-outs has been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>A harmonious relationship between the school administration and studentry. </li></ul><ul><li>A quality and improved educational facilities that would cater the basic needs and requirements of students. </li></ul><ul><li>Justified and reasonable collection fees collected. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimized the high of incidence of forced relationship between educators and students. </li></ul>
  • 45. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of regular drop-outs per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of regular program partnerships conducted by and between the school administration and studentry. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of quality and improved educational facilities that cater the basic needs and requirements of students. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of justified and reasonable collection fees. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of incidence of forced relationship between educators and students. </li></ul>
  • 46. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 - 2013 </li></ul>
  • 47. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of the President, CHED, Legislators, LGU’s, State Colleges &amp; Universities, TESDA, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, School Institutions, DepEd, CHED, Student Councils, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, PAASCU, CHED, School Institutions, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., Student Councils, Legislators </li></ul><ul><li>CHED, DepEd, School Institutions, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., Student Councils. </li></ul><ul><li>School Institutions, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., Student Councils. </li></ul>
  • 48. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body. </li></ul>
  • 49. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>20million per year for 1,000 student all over Bicol Region. (OP, Senate, House of Representatives, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>6million per year for 100 public high schools, State, Colleges and Universities. (OP, Congress, DepEd/CHED) </li></ul><ul><li>10million per year for 100 public high schools, State, Colleges and Universities. (OP, Congress, DepEd/CHED) </li></ul><ul><li>1milliom per year for 100 public high schools, State, Colleges and Universities. (OP, Congress, DepEd/CHED) </li></ul><ul><li>2million per year for 100 public high schools, State, Colleges and Universities. (OP, Congress, DepEd/CHED) </li></ul>
  • 50. <ul><li>ISSUES ON HEALTH </li></ul>
  • 51. ISSUES ON HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOR <ul><li> number of 20-24 year olds who smoke, drink and use prohibited drugs </li></ul><ul><li> incidence of premarital sex involving younger age group (15-17) </li></ul><ul><li>Youth pregnancies: 30% of all births, 6% of spontaneous abortions, 3 out of 4 maternal deaths </li></ul><ul><li>STDs (62%); HIV/AIDS (29% of reported cases) </li></ul><ul><li>Early marriage </li></ul>
  • 52. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Increasing incidence of unwanted pregnancies among students. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing number of students using illegal drugs, cigarettes and liquors. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing number of students suffering hunger while in school. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing number of In-School Youth who are suffering from ill effects of improper hygiene especially in rural/remote areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Unhealthy and hazardous school environment. </li></ul><ul><li>The alarming incidents of “Prosti – Tuition” in tertiary level. </li></ul>
  • 53. Strategy: <ul><li>Proper monitoring and education on reproductive health among in school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Massive campaign and advocacy on the fight against illegal drugs, excessive use of cigarettes and liquors among in school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify disadvantage /marginalized students who are suffering hunger while in school for appropriate and focus targeting. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce education on the proper hygiene among in school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish a safe and healthy school environment for the protection and welfare of in school youths. </li></ul><ul><li>Create an alternative Livelihood or source of income for the in school youth. </li></ul>
  • 54. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Initiate/Conduct seminars and include discussions on reproductive health programs in school curricula. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct information dissemination campaign through the use of media and initiate campus seminars on the ill effect of using illegal drugs, excessive cigarettes and drinking liquors. </li></ul><ul><li>Create or establish access to avail free food initiated by the government which are intended for the marginalized/disadvantage youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Invite health authorities to educate the In-School Youth regarding proper hygiene. </li></ul><ul><li>Spearhead clean – up drives and strict imposition of safety measures within the campus. </li></ul><ul><li>Organize or establish students cooperative, initiate students loan program, part-time jobs and other alternative livelihood programs. </li></ul>
  • 55. Output: <ul><li>At least 20% of the previous unwanted pregnancies of In- School Youth had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 30% of the previous drug, cigarette, liquor dependent had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 50% of the previous hunger incidence had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 20% of the previous In-School Youth who were practicing improper hygiene had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 50% of the previous unhealthy and hazardous school environment had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 20% of the previous incidents in the “Prosti – Tuition” had been minimized per year. </li></ul>
  • 56. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of unwanted pregnancies per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of drug, cigarettes, liquor dependent per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of hunger incidence per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of students who are practicing improper hygiene. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of unhealthy and hazardous school environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of incidents in the “Prosti – tuition”. </li></ul>
  • 57. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2009 – 2012 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 - 2013 </li></ul>
  • 58. Stakeholders: <ul><li>DOH, State Colleges &amp; Universities, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., Student Councils. </li></ul><ul><li>Media (Print media, Broadcast media), Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., NGO’s, PDEA, Student Councils. </li></ul><ul><li>DOH, Legislators, Aquing Bicolnon, NGO’s, Private individuals. </li></ul><ul><li>DOH, NGO’s, Private individuals, State Colleges &amp; Universities, Aquing Bicolnon, INC., Student Councils, Media (Print media, Broadcast media). </li></ul><ul><li>Student Councils, Media (Print media, Broadcast media), State Colleges &amp; Universities, DepEd, Legislators, Office of the President, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Media (Print media, Broadcast media), Student Councils, State Colleges &amp; Universities </li></ul>
  • 59. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body </li></ul>
  • 60. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P1 million per year for 2000 student all over Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P5 million per year for 100 public high school, State Colleges &amp; Universities. </li></ul><ul><li>P10million per year for 100 public high school, State Collegesn &amp; Universities. </li></ul><ul><li>P2million year for 1000 student all over Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P5million for 50 public high school, State Colleges &amp; Universities. </li></ul><ul><li>P10million for 2000 student all over Bicol region. </li></ul>
  • 61. <ul><li>Issues on the Needed Legislations </li></ul>
  • 62. <ul><li>OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH </li></ul>
  • 63. Out-of-School Youth <ul><li>Not enrolled in any formal or vocational school </li></ul><ul><li>Not employed and not a tertiary level graduate </li></ul>Definition: Population
  • 64. <ul><li>more supportive policy and program environment </li></ul>Upside: <ul><li>a growing population of OSY </li></ul><ul><li>an increasing number of rural youth among the OSY population </li></ul><ul><li>lack of plans among many OSY to continue their education </li></ul><ul><li>traditional and cultural norms that factor into the OSY problem </li></ul><ul><li>low participation in productive endeavors </li></ul>Downside:
  • 65. <ul><li>Issues on Economic &amp; Livelihood </li></ul>
  • 66. ISSUES ON EMPLOYMENT <ul><li>1.7 unemployed youth: 49% of 3.5 million total unemployed population </li></ul><ul><li>Youth workers: low income, limited access to social security &amp; health protection, less pay for equal work compared to adult workers </li></ul><ul><li>Workers’ rights: poor bargaining power, limited protection by unions </li></ul><ul><li>Casualization: temporary employment, lack of security of tenure, subcontracting </li></ul><ul><li>Work in hazardous occupations </li></ul><ul><li>Exploitation by employers, abuse of OFW women </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of competencies, skills &amp; positive work attitudes among job seekers </li></ul>
  • 67. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Increasing number of OSY who cannot access to education and job opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of alternative livelihood programs for OSY introduced by the government or private sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of OSY has no definite source of income to sustain their basic needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Majority of OSY has limited knowledge and skills that may fit onto the basic job requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>High incidence of job discriminations on the OSY who has past criminal records. </li></ul>
  • 68. Strategy: <ul><li>Provide accurate data for OSY with regards the access to education and job opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide an easy avenue for the immediate availment of government or private sector’s livelihood programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce various alternative livelihood programs to answer the basic needs of OSY. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide capability and skills training program for the OSY in order to sustain the basic job requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Impose punishment/ penalties to employers who discriminate OSY with past criminal records on their job employment. </li></ul>
  • 69. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Institutionalize the pooling of applicants for potential job placement opportunities at website of every LGU’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Institutionalize the data of potentials job openings and livelihood programs at the website of every LGU. </li></ul><ul><li>Organize youth cooperatives, establish network with lending institutions for the initial operations of the OSY business endeavors and provide support services for the sub-sector’s needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement the proposed program partnership between the Aquing Bicolnon Inc., State Colleges and Universities, LGUs, TESDA, and NISVA foundation for the skills training program and for the establishment of skills training center in Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Legal and consultative venue for OSY who is experiencing job discrimination. </li></ul>
  • 70. Output: <ul><li>Through the establishment of youth cooperatives and networking with lending institutions, at least 20% of the OSY can now access to education and job opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>By institutionalizing the LGU’s data bank system for pooling applicants, at least 20% of the OSY can now avail the livelihood programs and job opportunities introduced by the government and private sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>By the establishment of youth cooperatives and access to lending institutions, at least 20% of the OSY has now generated incomes to support their basic needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Through the implementation of the skills training programs and establishment training centers, at least 30% of unskilled OSY gained required knowledge and skills for employment. </li></ul><ul><li>By strict imposition of punishments against employers who discriminate OSY with past criminal records with regards to employment, at least 30% of the OSY who are suffering from said unfair treatment are minimized. </li></ul>
  • 71. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of OSY who are not access to education and job opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of alternative livelihood programs introduced government and private sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of alternative programs for the basic needs of OSY. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of skills training programs and training centers for OSY. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of job discriminations on OSY who has past criminal records. </li></ul>
  • 72. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul>
  • 73. Stakeholders: <ul><li>NGOs, DepEd, TESDA, Aquing Bicolnon Inc., Legislators, Private Sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs, Legislators, LGUs, Individuals/ Private sectors, DOLE </li></ul><ul><li>LGUs, NGOs, DOLE, Aquing Bicolnon Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Aquing Bicolnon Inc., LGUs, NGOs, TESDA, State Colleges and Universities, NISVA Foundation. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, NGOs, LGUs, DOLE </li></ul>
  • 74. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 75. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P5million per year for OSY in Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P3million per year in Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P5million per year. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year in Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P5million per year. </li></ul>
  • 76. <ul><li>Issues on Peace &amp; Order </li></ul>
  • 77. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Due to lack of access to education and job opportunities, most OSY are prone to violating laws on peace on order imposed by the authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of OSY are tempted in joining groups with unlawful objectives such as gangs, organized crime groups, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Some OSY are vulnerable in community crimes as their outlet to gain attention and be recognized in the society. </li></ul><ul><li>Some married OSY are contributing to the increasing incidence of domestic violence because of poverty. </li></ul>
  • 78. Strategy: <ul><li>Provide access to education and job opportunities to OSY to prevent violation of laws or peace and order. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase penalty against those groups with unlawful and illegal acts. </li></ul><ul><li>Inculcate the value of good and upright citizenry. </li></ul><ul><li>Instill the value and sanctity of marriage, rights and duties of husband and wife to one another. </li></ul>
  • 79. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Conduct or sponsor regular jobs fair, additional special scholarship program for OSY and provide an easy access to education and job opportunities by establishing a data banking system at the website of respective LGU’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct an intensive information and dissemination campaign with regards to the imposition of penalties against unlawful groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate activities such as caucuses and fora intended for OSY to boost the principles of good and upright citizenry. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct free marriage counseling services for OSY to prevent domestic violence. </li></ul>
  • 80. Output: <ul><li>By providing jobs fair, additional special scholarship programs and establishing a data banking system in the website of respective LGU’s, at least 20% of OSY have now access to education &amp; job opportunities that minimized violation of laws on peace &amp; order. </li></ul><ul><li>Through intensive information dissemination campaign, at least 30% of the previous number of OSY joining unlawful groups had been minimized. </li></ul><ul><li>Through regular caucuses and fora that boost the moral, strengthen the belief and deepen the faith of OSY to the value and principles of good and upright citizenry, at least 30% of the OSY who were vulnerable to committing crimes were minimized. </li></ul><ul><li>By establishing a free marriage counseling, at least 20% of the increasing incidence of the domestic violence have been minimized </li></ul>
  • 81. Indicators: <ul><li>Numbers of OSY who are prone to violating laws per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Numbers of OSY who are tempted in joining groups with unlawful objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Numbers of OSY who are vulnerable in committing crimes as their outlet to gain attention. </li></ul><ul><li>Numbers of married OSY who are contributing to the increasing incidence of domestic violence because of poverty. </li></ul>
  • 82. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul>
  • 83. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of thePresident, Congress, NGOs/POs, Private Sectors/Individuals, LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Media (print media and broadcast media), NGOs/POs, LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs/POs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., DSWD, Media </li></ul><ul><li>GOs, Religious Groups, NGOs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., </li></ul>
  • 84. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 85. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P10million per year for 100 public high schools, State Colleges and Universities. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year for six provinces in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P3million per year for 1000 Out-of-School Youth in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year. </li></ul>
  • 86. <ul><li>wORKING YOUTH </li></ul>
  • 87. Working Youth <ul><li>15 – 30 years old </li></ul><ul><li>either employed, self-employed, underemployed, or belong to specific employable job-seeking youth groups both in the formal and informal sectors </li></ul>Definition: Population
  • 88. <ul><li>increasing labor force participation of young women </li></ul><ul><li>availability of labor market-based training programs </li></ul><ul><li>opportunities arising from globalization </li></ul><ul><li>better policy environment for young workers </li></ul>Upside: <ul><li>slow pace of job creation in the country </li></ul><ul><li>wide disparity in the labor force participation between </li></ul><ul><li>men and women </li></ul><ul><li>continued hiring of minors </li></ul><ul><li>vulnerability of young overseas Filipino workers </li></ul><ul><li>poor implementation of labor laws and standards </li></ul>Downside:
  • 89. <ul><li>Issues on Economic &amp; Livelihood </li></ul>
  • 90. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Rampant under wage practices experienced by the working youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the working youth have no security of tenure in their respective employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the working youths were not given statutory benefits due to them. </li></ul><ul><li>Working youths are suffering from delayed payments of their salaries/ wage as the common practice of most employers </li></ul>
  • 91. Strategy: <ul><li>The working youth should be well-informed about the minimum wage being given to their respective area and must have an easy access to the concerned government agencies for possible queries and assistance. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide mechanism in order that the working youth would get security of tenure in their respective employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Strict implementation of the mandated statutory benefits for employees and give more power and authority to the concerned agencies for the welfare and protection of the working youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned government agencies should monitor the schedule of payment of salaries/ wages to the employees through close coordination with the employers. </li></ul>
  • 92. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>The concerned agencies should provide “Hotlines” in order to address the queries and to give due and immediate assistance to aggrieved working youth, and conduct regular consultations with employers and employees. </li></ul><ul><li>Legislate laws prohibiting “Employment-Agency Practice” (less than 6 months contract), and encourage employers to do direct hiring. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct regular status reports on the compensation and benefits for the employees </li></ul><ul><li>Obliged employers to submit copies of payroll reports to the concerned government agencies to determine weather the schedule of salaries are properly disposed. </li></ul>
  • 93. Output: <ul><li>Through the regular consultations and by providing “Hotlines” to address the queries and to give assistance to the aggrieved employees, at least 20% of the working youth who had experienced underwage practices were given appropriate wages/salaries per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By having a law which prohibits “Employment-Agency Practice” and by encouraging employers to do direct hiring, at least 20% of the previous numbers of working youth with out employment security of tenure were minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By conducting regular status reports on the compensation benefits for the employees and by giving more power and authorities to the concerned government agencies, at least 20% of the previous number of working youth who were not given statutory benefits were minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By obliging employers to submit copies of payroll reports to the concerned government agencies to determine whether the schedule of salaries were properly disposed, at least 20% of the previous number of incidence of delayed payments for working youth were minimized per year. </li></ul>
  • 94. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of underwage practices experienced of working youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of working youth who do not have security of tenure in their employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of working youth who were not given statutory benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of working youth who were suffering from delayed payments of salaries/wages . </li></ul>
  • 95. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul>
  • 96. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, NGOs/POs, Private Secors/Individuals, LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, DOLE, LGUs, Pos/NGOs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, DOLE, LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the Prsident, Congress,DOLE, POs/NGOs, </li></ul><ul><li>LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul>
  • 97. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 98. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P1million per year for Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year for 1000 OSY for Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year for Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year. </li></ul>
  • 99. Issues on Health &amp; Environment
  • 100. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Most of the business establishments are not compliant to the basic health and sanitation requirements imposed by the authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the business establishments are not particular in providing protective gears and facilities to the employees for their safety. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of working youth are forced to work beyond his work load that causes unhealthy physical condition. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the working youth are being hired without complying basic medical examination requirements and being assigned to the work that may not be suitable to their physical capabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the employers are not offering regular medical services to the employees to determine their physical and health condition. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of working youth are experiencing harassments from their employers and/or superiors that causes physical and emotional problems . </li></ul>
  • 101. Strategy: <ul><li>Strict compliance to the required health and environmental standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Imposing greater penalties for non-compliance to basic safety standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees should be advised on the right placement of employees that may be fitted to the specific task. </li></ul><ul><li>Employer should strictly impose the submission of basic medical requirements by the applicants before hiring. </li></ul><ul><li>Strict implementation of the mandatory yearly physical examinations to determine the health condition of each employees. </li></ul><ul><li>Give more adjudicatory powers to the concerned institutions for a more speedy, fair disposition of cases filed by the aggrieved party and provide Working Youth with easy and accessible networks to the said institutions. </li></ul>
  • 102. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Conduct a surprise inspection to the business establishments to determine whether or not they are compliant to the basic health and sanitary requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate regular monitoring systems to ensure that business establishments are practicing safety and precautionary measures for the welfare of the Working Youth-employees. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct visits to the workplace to know the safety needs of the Working Youth-employees. </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate with the Human Resource Department (HRD) of the business establishments to countercheck whether they are complying the basic requirements before hiring. </li></ul><ul><li>Require business establishments to submit reports on the employees yearly mandatory medical examinations to the concerned agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide special section/desk that would immediately address the complaint filed by the aggrieved ; e.i.”anti-job harassment desk” and making the manner of filling the complaint more easily, without prejudice to the rights of the accused. </li></ul>
  • 103. Output: <ul><li>By conducting surprised inspection to business establishments to determine whether or not they are compliant to the basic health and environment standard, at least 30% of the previous number of violators had been minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Through initiating a regular monitoring system to ensure that business establishments are practicing safety and precautionary measures at least 30% of business establishments that does not provide protective gears and facilities to employees are minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By conducting visits to the workplace in order to know the safety needs of the employees, at least 30% of the previous number of working youth who are forced to work beyond their workload are minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Trough counterchecking whether business establishments are complying the basic requirements before hiring, at least 30% of the current number of business establishments which do not require medical examination are minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By acquiring business establishments to submit reports on the employees yearly mandatory medial examination to the concerned agencies, at least 30% medical services of the current number of business establishments which do not offer regular medical services to employees are minimized per year. </li></ul><ul><li>By providing special working group/section that would take actions to the complaint filed and making the manner of filling more easy without providing the rights of the accused at least 20% of working youth who experienced harassments from their employees and/or superior that causes emotional mental, problems are minimized per year </li></ul>
  • 104. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of business establishment that are not compliant with the basic health and sanitation requirement. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of business establishment that are not particular in providing protective gears and facilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of working youth who are forced to work beyond their workload. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of working youth who are being hired without complying basic medical examination requirements and being assigned to the work that may not be suitable to their physical capacity. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of employers who do not rendered regular medical services to the working youth-employees to determine their physical and health condition. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Working youth who are experiencing harassments from their employers. </li></ul>
  • 105. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul>
  • 106. Stakeholders: <ul><li>DTI, DOH, NGOs/POs, DOLE, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>DOLE, DTI, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>DSWD, DTI, DOLE, NGOs/POs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>DOH, DOLE, NGOs/Pos, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc </li></ul><ul><li>DOLE, DOH, NGOs/Pos, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>DOLE, DOJ, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., NGOs/POs </li></ul>
  • 107. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 108. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P2million per year </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million per year. </li></ul><ul><li>P2million per year. </li></ul>
  • 109. YOUTH WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
  • 110. Youth with Special Needs <ul><li>Includes ten major clientele categories: indigenous youth, differently -abled youth, youth in situations of armed conflict, young victims of disasters and calamities, youth offenders, juvenile delinquent, drug dependent youth, street youth, abused and exploited youth, and abandoned and neglected </li></ul><ul><li>Highly-diversified with different concerns and aspirations </li></ul><ul><li>Most often marginalized and discriminated </li></ul>Definition:
  • 111. Trend <ul><li>Passage of significant laws and policies </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation of programs and projects </li></ul>Upside: <ul><li>increasing population of the sub-groups </li></ul><ul><li>lack of relevant information and data </li></ul>Downside:
  • 112. Youth and Children with Special Needs Source: Philippine Resource Center, 1997-1999 <ul><li>17, 929 are abused </li></ul><ul><li>60,000 pushed to prostitution, 3200 expected to join every year </li></ul><ul><li>1.5 million are living on the streets increasing </li></ul><ul><li>6,400 per year </li></ul><ul><li>20, 000 in conflict with the law </li></ul>
  • 113. Youth and Children with Special Needs Source: Philippine Resource Center, 1997-1999 <ul><li>PROPORTIONS PER TYPE OF ABUSE </li></ul><ul><li>Physical- 9% </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual- 71% </li></ul><ul><li>Both Physical and Sexual- 4% </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect- 1% </li></ul><ul><li>No Validation- 15% </li></ul>
  • 114. Youth with Special Needs Major ISSUES <ul><li>Lack of access to education, health &amp; employment opportunities &amp; services </li></ul><ul><li>Discrimination </li></ul><ul><li>IP: Unresponsive educational system, which threatens the loss of cultural knowledge &amp; value systems </li></ul><ul><li>Problem on ancestral land ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Violation of rights </li></ul>
  • 115. Issues on Education
  • 116. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Less number of schools intended for Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul><ul><li>High number of Youth with Special Needs were not able to pursue their studies due to poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of special curricula intended for Youth with Special Needs particularly those who belong to sub-sectors with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of educational support services for Youth with Special Needs such as guidance and counseling, etc. </li></ul>
  • 117. Strategy: <ul><li>Increase the number of schools intended for Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a mechanism that will enable Youth with Special Needs to pursue higher studies. </li></ul><ul><li>Design special curricula suited to the respective needs, abilities and conditions of Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide accurate school facilities and educational materials that would meet the needs of Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance and strengthen the support services providers for Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul>
  • 118. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>To establish educational centers that would enlighten and impart knowledge and skills to the Youth with Special Needs in order for them to enhance their talents and capabilities to realize their roles in nation building. </li></ul><ul><li>To eliminate physical and economic status requirements for admission on the school which provides quality and higher learning. </li></ul><ul><li>To provide additional subjects that discuss developmental psychology; health and nutrition; peace; moral, spiritual &amp; emotional recovery program, and intellectual enhancement. </li></ul><ul><li>To strictly implement the laws that provides privileges and special attention to the Youth with Special Needs and if theres a needed, impose a higher penalty for non-compliance thereof. </li></ul><ul><li>To allocate more funds, additional man power and authority to the support services providers for the Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul>
  • 119. Output: <ul><li>By establishing at least 2 – 3 educational centers every province in 5 years that would enlighten and impart knowledge skills to the youth with special needs, at least 30% of the previous number of Youth with Special Needs who did not go to school, are now studying. </li></ul><ul><li>By eliminating physical and economic status requirements in admission to school which provides quality education, at least 30% of the previous number of Youth with Special Needs who were not able to pursue higher studies are now enrolled in schools. </li></ul><ul><li>By designing special curricula appropriate to the respective needs, abilities and conditions of Youth with Special Needs, the previous number of YSN who were not able to avail the programs are now benefiting. </li></ul><ul><li>By strict implementation of the laws that provides privileges and special attention to the Youth with Special Needs, at least 20% of the previous limited school facilities and educational materials were improved per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Through allocation of additional funds, man power and authority to support services providers, more than 20% from the previous limited educational services such as guidance and counseling were enhance per year. </li></ul>
  • 120. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of schools established intended for youth with special needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Youth with Special Needs who were not able to pursue their studies due to poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Special Curricula that are intended for youth with special needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of school facilities and educational materials intended for youth with special needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Support services that are intended for youth with special needs. </li></ul>
  • 121. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul>
  • 122. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of the President, DepEd, Congress, NGOs/POs, LGUs,Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, DepEd, Tesda, State Colleges &amp; Universities, NGOs/POs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc., </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, DepEd, State Colleges &amp; Universities, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, State Colleges &amp; Universities, DepEd, NOGOs/Pos, LGUs, Aquing Bicolnon,Inc., </li></ul><ul><li>Office of the President, Congress, DSWD, DepEd, State Colleges &amp; Universities, LGUs, NGOs/POs, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul>
  • 123. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 124. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P30million intended for six provinces in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P3million per year for Youth with Special Needs in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P2million per year for Six provinces of Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P5million in Six provinces of Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>P1million In Six provinces in Bicol region. </li></ul>
  • 125. <ul><li>Issues on Health </li></ul>
  • 126. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Increasing incidence of Youth with Special Needs suffering from health problems were not given basic health attention and services due to lack of institutions and facilities </li></ul>
  • 127. Strategy: <ul><li>Establish institutions and strengthen the health services &amp; facilities to maximize the implementation of programs and projects for YSN to realize their potentials as stakeholders and direct participants in nation building </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct actual needs analysis to have accurate and regular health services to directly solve the specific concerns of the YSN </li></ul>
  • 128. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Legislate laws or ordinances for: “YSN Budget and Development” in every LGU to allocate at least 2% from the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) and National Government shares </li></ul>
  • 129. Output: <ul><li>By establishing institutions and facilities and strengthening the health services that maximized the implementation of programs and projects for Youth with Special Needs, at least 30% of the previous number of health problems incidence of YSN were minimized per year. </li></ul>
  • 130. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of Youth with Special Needs suffering from health problems were not given basic health services and attention due to lack of institutions and facilities </li></ul>
  • 131. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul>
  • 132. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of the President, DOH, LGUs, NGOs/POs, Legislators, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul>
  • 133. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body . </li></ul>
  • 134. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P30 Million per year in Bicol Region </li></ul>
  • 135. <ul><li>Issues on Livelihood </li></ul>
  • 136. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Most of Youth with Special Needs are not employed. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of Youth With Special Needs lacks training expertise for their possible employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing incidence of Job discrimination for YSN when it comes to job employment </li></ul>
  • 137. Strategy: <ul><li>Create more livelihood programs intended for YSN by providing capital and technical support. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide technical and skills trainings for YSN </li></ul><ul><li>Implement the special laws for the protection and welfare of the Youth With Special Needs </li></ul>
  • 138. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Establish cooperatives for the YSN for their income generation and business engagements </li></ul><ul><li>Establish training centers in respective provinces/Cities in Bicol region in partnership with the government, NGOs and POs. </li></ul><ul><li>Impose higher punishment to those who violate the special protection laws for the YSN. </li></ul>
  • 139. Output: <ul><li>By creating more livelihood programs intended for YSN, at least 30% of the previous number of YSN who were not employed have achieved and provided with employment. </li></ul><ul><li>By establishing various training centers in provinces/cities in Bicol region, at least 30% of the previous number of youth with special needs who lacked of skills trainings are now possessed with the knowledge and skills. </li></ul><ul><li>By strict imposition of higher penalties to those who violated the special protection laws for YSN, at least 20% of the previous number of discriminated YSN are now given attention and are being employed </li></ul>
  • 140. Indicators: <ul><li>Number of Youth with Special Needs who are not employed. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Youth with Special Needs lacks of training expertise for their possible employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of job discrimination for YSN. </li></ul>
  • 141. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul>
  • 142. Stakeholders: <ul><li>NGOs/POs, LGUs, DOLE, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs/PO’s, LGUs, DepEd, Tesda, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>DOLE, NGOs/POs, Legislators, Office of the President. </li></ul>
  • 143. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body. </li></ul>
  • 144. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P5million per year for 1000 YSN all over Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P60million for six provinces all over Bicol Region </li></ul><ul><li>P2million per year. </li></ul>
  • 145. <ul><li>Issues on Basic </li></ul><ul><li>Rights </li></ul>
  • 146. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Lack of direct representations in Government Development Bodies/Councils </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of recognition to Youth with Special Needs’ basic rights and privileges by the communities/society as provided for by law. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of clear and comprehensive policy of the government on the protection, benefits and incentives granted to Youth with Special Needs </li></ul>
  • 147. Strategy: <ul><li>Empower Youth with Special Needs to have a representation on government’s development bodies/councils </li></ul><ul><li>Strict imposition of the law which recognizes the basic rights and privileges of Youth with Special Needs </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a more specific, direct and precise policy and programs on the protection, benefits and incentives for the welfare and development of the Youth with Special Needs. </li></ul>
  • 148. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>Assist the Youth with special needs to establish a structured organization that would represent their sub-sector in planning and implementation of programs and projects of the government’s development bodies/councils </li></ul><ul><li>Establish Non-government organizations vested with equal functions with the governments’ concerned institution to have check and balances on the recognition of youth with special needs’ basic rights and privileges. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Youth with special Needs’ Medium Term Development Plan and conduct a yearly summit or congress for that would discuss their welfare and development. </li></ul>
  • 149. Output: <ul><li>By establishing a structured organization that would represent the youth with special needs in planning and implementation of programs and projects, the sub-sector are now well represented in the government’s development bodies/councils. </li></ul><ul><li>By establishing a Non-Governmental Organization vested with equal functions with the concerned government institution which serves for check and balances on the recognition of YSN’s basic rights, the sector are now well recognized. </li></ul><ul><li>By formulating Youth with special Needs’ Medium Term Youth development Plan and by conducting a yearly summit or congress, a more clear and comprehensive policy of the government on the protection, benefits and incentives are now being implemented . </li></ul>
  • 150. Indicators: <ul><li>No. of YSN who do not have direct representation in Government Development Councils. </li></ul><ul><li>No. of YSN with lack of recognition about their basic rights and privileges. </li></ul><ul><li>No. of YSN with lack of clear and comprehensive policy of the government on the protection, benefits, incentives, granted to YSN </li></ul>
  • 151. Time Frame: <ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2008 – 2013 </li></ul>
  • 152. Stakeholders: <ul><li>Office of the President, NGOs/POs, LGUs, DSWD, Legislators, Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. </li></ul>
  • 153. Roles: <ul><li>Procurement of funds and implementing body. </li></ul>
  • 154. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds: <ul><li>P10million per year for YSN all over Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P12million per year for six provinces in Bicol Region. </li></ul><ul><li>P2million per year. </li></ul>
  • 155. <ul><li>SANGGUNIANG KABATAAN </li></ul>
  • 156. Major Issues: <ul><li>Created in 1991, the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) can directly participate at all levels of governance. However,the SK is criticized for not doing enough for youth development. </li></ul><ul><li>Some lawmakers want to abolish the SK . </li></ul><ul><li>SK: venue for youth political participation (mainly associated with sports-related activities) </li></ul>
  • 157. <ul><li>Issues on Authority &amp; Responsibity </li></ul>
  • 158. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>Sangguniang kabataan are misrepresenting the Youth sector as a whole as defined under RA 8044 since their age bracket and membership are only 15 to 17 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Aside from the SK Chairman, other SK Officials do not possess the privilege of being agents and/or persons in authority against physical and/or other forms of assaults </li></ul><ul><li>considering that Sks are below the legal age, they cannot enter into a legal contract or agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Most Sangguniang Kabataan(SK) are politicized by higher authorities resulted to incompetence and irresponsible officials </li></ul><ul><li>Projects and programs are focused on sports and recreational activities rather than for the holistic development of physical, emotional and intellectual well being of the youth </li></ul>
  • 159. Strategy: <ul><li>Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) Reform Bill should be push through in order that: </li></ul><ul><li>(a) the proper representation of the youth sector as defined under RA 8044 would be adopted; (b) SK Officials should possess the privilege of being agents and/or person in authority; (c) can enter into a legal contract or agreement; (d) SK should be apolitical, responsible and competent officials; and (e) the projects and programs are more focused on holistic development of physical, emotional and intellectual well being of the youth. </li></ul>
  • 160. Activities/Programs/Projects: <ul><li>There should be a local integrated youth development council represented by the five (5) sub-sectors: ISY, OSY, WY, YSN and SKs in provincial, City municipal, and barangay levels under the existing Regional Integrated Youth Development Council of the Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. in order that all sub-sectors of youth will be well represented. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate provisions in SK reform Bill that would give privilege to all SK officials of being agents and/or persons in authority against physical and/or other forms of assaults. </li></ul><ul><li>Support the SK reform bill provision that change the age bracket of illegible Katipunan ng Kabataan and sangguniang Kabataan from the present 15 to 17 years old to 18 to 21 years old so that they could enter into a legal agreement or contract. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase the penalties against officials of the government or individuals who found to be intervening the conduct and exercise of the SK elections and affairs </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct a regular leadership trainings, capability building programs and seminar workshop on the basics of legislation and draft an clear and comprehensive Medium Term Development Plan that would include a holistic development of physical, emotional and intellectual well being of the youth. </li></ul>
  • 161. Output: <ul><li>By having a Local Integrated youth development council represented by five (5) sub-sectors: ISY, OSY, WY, YSN and SKs aged 15 to 35 years old, the youth sector are well represented </li></ul><ul><li>BY implementing provision in Reform Law that gave privileged to all SK officials as agents and persons in authority, the SK officials are now vested with protection an authority </li></ul><ul><li>By implementing provisions of SK reform law that changed the age bracket of illegible Katipunan ng Kabataan and sanggguniang Kabataan from the present 15 to 17 years old to 18 to 21 years old, elected SK Officials could now enter into a legal agreement or contract </li></ul><ul><li>By increasing the penalty against officials of the government or individuals who found to be intervening the conduct and exercise of SK elections and affairs, politicized SKs are now minimized </li></ul><ul><li>By conducting regular leadership trainings, capability building programs and seminar workshops on the basics of legislation and to draft a clear and comprehensive Medium Term development plan that would include a holistic development of physical, emotional and intellectual well being of the youth, the SK projects and programs are now more focused on holistic development of physical, emotional and intellectual well being of the youth. </li></ul>
  • 162. Indicators:
  • 163. Time Frame:
  • 164. Stakeholders:
  • 165. Roles:
  • 166. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds:
  • 167. <ul><li>Issues on Benefits &amp; Privileges </li></ul>
  • 168. Identified Gaps: <ul><li>The scholarship program for the SK officials as guaranteed by the Local Government Code of 1991 were not grated to them due to shortage of funds being subsidized by the government to the State Colleges and Universities (SCUs) </li></ul><ul><li>The term of office of SKs being rendered are not considered as counted- years in government service </li></ul><ul><li>Only SK Chairman is grated Sub-professional Civil Service Illegibility while other SK officials who are also elected and served the same term, however, not given the same privilege. </li></ul><ul><li>SK Councilors are not given monitary compensation compared to the SK Chairman with a fixed honorarium equal to the ordinary elected barangay councilor. </li></ul>
  • 169. Strategy: <ul><li>Call the attention of the Congress particularly the House Committee on Appropriation to revisit the provisions of RA 7160 on the privilege of SKs for scholarship programs being subsidized by the government to State Colleges and Universities (SCUs) </li></ul>
  • 170. Activities/Programs/Projects:s <ul><li>There should be a local integrated youth development council represented by the five (5) sub-sectors: ISY, OSY, WY, YSN and SKs in provincial, City municipal, and barangay levels under the existing Regional Integrated Youth Development Council of the Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. in order that all sub-sectors of youth will be well represented. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate provisions in SK reform Bill that would give privilege to all SK officials of being agents and/or persons in authority against physical and/or other forms of assaults. </li></ul><ul><li>Support the SK reform bill provision that change the age bracket of illegible Katipunan ng Kabataan and sangguniang Kabataan from the present 15 to 17 years old to 18 to 21 years old so that they could enter into a legal agreement or contract. </li></ul>
  • 171. Output:
  • 172. Indicators:
  • 173. Time Frame:
  • 174. Stakeholders:
  • 175. Roles:
  • 176. &nbsp;
  • 177. Estimated Cost/Possible Source of Funds:
  • 178. What are now the tough issues faced by the Aquing Bicolnon-Youth ?
  • 179. Top Survival and Developmental Issues Aquing Bicolnon-Youth CHALLENGES &amp; ISSUES ISSUE PROVINCE HIGHEST (%) AFFECTED TOTAL 1. Education Catanduanes, Camarines Notrte, Masbate, Sorsogon 4 2. Employment 3. Health 4. Reproductive Health 5. Family Problems 6. Environmental Awareness 7. Poverty 8. Mental Health 9. Early Marriages 10. Moral Degradation
  • 180. Top Protection Issues Aquing Bicolnon-Youth CHALLENGES &amp; ISSUES ISSUE PROVINCE HIGHEST (%) AFFECTED TOTAL 1. Substance Abuse 2. Children in Conflict with Law 3. Child Abuse 4. Child Labor 5. Pre-Marital Sex 6. Prostitution 7. Fraternities/Sororities/Hazing 8. Discrimination 9. Youth with Disabilities 10. Sexual Harassment/Rape
  • 181. Top Participation Issues Aquing Bicolnon-Youth CHALLENGES &amp; ISSUES ISSUE PROVINCE HIGHEST (%) AFFECTED TOTAL 1. Gov’t.-Related Problems 2. Sangguniang Kabataan 3. Lack of Active Participation (youth) 4. Lack of Access to Information 5. Insufficient &amp;Inefficient Allocation of Budget 6. Suppression of Rights (press) 7. National Youth Commission 8. No youth Sub-Sector Rep 9. Ineffective Coordination among Youth Orgs 10. Limited Campus Orgs/Student Body Forums
  • 182. Aquing Bicolnon-Youth CHALLENGES &amp; ISSUES f rom other related studies <ul><li>Created in 1991, the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) can </li></ul><ul><li>directly participate at all levels of governance. However, </li></ul><ul><li>the SK is criticized for not doing enough for youth </li></ul><ul><li>development. </li></ul><ul><li>Some lawmakers want to abolish the SK . </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of parental support is a key barrier to youth </li></ul><ul><li>participation. </li></ul><ul><li>The situation of youth with special needs can pose </li></ul><ul><li>as barrier to their active participation. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural norms and traditions tend to resist </li></ul><ul><li>young people’s efforts in assuming leadership </li></ul><ul><li>and responsibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Many young people have been raised to be passive and </li></ul><ul><li>not to question authority. </li></ul>
  • 183. Aquing Bicolnon-Youth CHALLENGES &amp; ISSUES f rom other related studies <ul><li>Lack of financial resources is a barrier in initiating </li></ul><ul><li>youth development activities. </li></ul><ul><li>In many parts of the country, females are given less </li></ul><ul><li>opportunities than their male counterparts </li></ul><ul><li>Class distinction inhibit the young people from poor </li></ul><ul><li>Many school administrators are seen as barriers in </li></ul><ul><li>effective youth participation </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of time due to school and work obligations prevents </li></ul><ul><li>young people from giving as much energy as they would </li></ul><ul><li>like in development programs. </li></ul>
  • 184. &nbsp;
  • 185. INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES TO YOUTH ISSUES <ul><li>Roles of youth-serving agencies: </li></ul><ul><li>Policy formulation Program development &amp; implementation </li></ul><ul><li>National planning </li></ul><ul><li>Regulatory function </li></ul><ul><li>Service provision </li></ul><ul><li>Research/monitoring &amp; evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Networking &amp; mobilization </li></ul><ul><li>Most common program: On the Job Training/Internship program </li></ul><ul><li>With biggest budgetary allocation: </li></ul><ul><li>Highly specialized training (science &amp; technology) </li></ul><ul><li>International youth exposures </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition/awards to outstanding youth/youth organization </li></ul><ul><li>Lowest budgetary support: Youth health </li></ul>
  • 186. <ul><li>High target accomplishment: </li></ul><ul><li>On the job-training </li></ul><ul><li>Job fairs </li></ul><ul><li>Seminars </li></ul><ul><li>Youth month/day celebrations Competitions </li></ul><ul><li>Average accomplishment: </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>Youth program monitoring: </li></ul><ul><li>No regular updating &amp; consolidation of youth data </li></ul>
  • 187. IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES <ul><li>Lack of resources (funds, human resource, equipment, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Low priority given to youth concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of advocacy &amp; information dissemination, or social marketing on youth programs </li></ul><ul><li>Need for knowledge &amp; skills upgrading among youth program implementers </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of support from some stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Negative attitude of some youth (apathy, lack of interest to participate, indulging in vices, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Peace &amp; order problem </li></ul><ul><li>Delay in fund release; delay in report submission </li></ul>
  • 188. YOUTH PARTICIPATION <ul><li>Extensive enabling laws and policies on youth participation at international &amp; national levels </li></ul><ul><li>SK: venue for youth political participation (mainly associated with sports-related activities) </li></ul><ul><li>FGD data: high level of youth participation at home, in school &amp; in youth organization </li></ul><ul><li>Limited participation in community undertakings </li></ul><ul><li>Youth mainly participate in program implementation; limited participation in planning &amp; evaluation stages </li></ul><ul><li>Student organizations remain active but beset with internal &amp; external challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Low awareness &amp; apathy towards cultural values &amp; national political affairs </li></ul>
  • 189. &nbsp;
  • 190. &nbsp;
  • 191. &nbsp;
  • 192. &nbsp;
  • 193. <ul><li>R egional </li></ul><ul><li>i ntegrated </li></ul><ul><li>y outh </li></ul><ul><li>D evelopment </li></ul><ul><li>c ouncil </li></ul>
  • 194. <ul><li>Constitution and By-Laws of the AB-RIYDC </li></ul>
  • 195. PREAMBLE <ul><li>We, the members of the Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. Regional Integrated youth Development Council of Bicol Region, imploring the aid of the Divine Providence, believe in the significant and distinct role of our sector in working for genuine social change and national development. Being vibrant and inspired movers of our society, we shall strive to galvanize our potentials and crystallize our noble ideals to serve our youth and people. United in our mission, we uphold and abide by this Constitution and By-Laws. </li></ul>
  • 196. <ul><li>ARTICLE I </li></ul><ul><li>NAME </li></ul><ul><li>This organization shall be known as Aquing Bicolnon, Inc. Regional Integrated Youth Development Council, hereinafter referred to as the AB-RIYDC. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE II </li></ul><ul><li>DECLARATION OF PRINCIPLES </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. The AB-RIYDC upholds the Philippine Constitution and will actively work for its total realization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. We uphold the principles of democracy, social, justice, and human rights. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. We recognize the important role of the youth sector as a prime mover of our society and as a catalyst for authentic national development. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. We uphold genuine nationalism, which includes our right as people to determine our destiny. </li></ul>
  • 197. <ul><li>Section 5. We uphold the spirit of equality and respect among the nations of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 6. We uphold the principle of genuine local autonomy. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 7. We uphold them principle of Equitable and Sustainable Economic Development. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 8. We believe in People Empowerment. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 9. We will ensure the Effective and Efficient delivery of public goods and basic social services. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 10. We believe in Focused Targeting in allocation of resources to disadvantage groups. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE III </li></ul><ul><li>MEMBERSHIP </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. REGULAR MEMBERS. There are two (2) classification of membership in AB-RIYDC: Territorial and Sub-Sectoral Representatives: </li></ul><ul><li>In order to qualify as Territorial Representative, a Youth Representative must: (i) Be of legal age; (ii) be residing in the particular province or congressional district or city for at least two (2) years; (iii) be a member of Aquing Bicolnon,Inc.; and (iv) be endorsed by a designated AB Territorial Representative; </li></ul>
  • 198. <ul><li>In order to qualify as youth Sub-Sectoral Representative, a Youth Representative must: (i) belong to the sub-sector of either ISY/OSY/WY/YSN aged 15 to 35 years old; (ii) be residing in Bicol region for at least two (2) years; (iii) be a member of Aquing Bicolnon, Inc.; and (iv) be elected by the general membership of AB-Youth Sector. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. EX-OFFICIO MEMBER. The duly elected SK Regional Federation President shall automatically served as Ex-Officio member of AB-RIYDC representing the sub-sector of SK/KK. His/her membership in the Councilshall likewise be co-terminus with his/her tenure of office </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE IV </li></ul><ul><li>ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. REGIONAL COUNCIL. AB-RIYDC is the highest policy and governing body of the organization in the absence of the Regional Assembly. It shall be composed of the Territorial and Sub-Sectoral Youth Representatives, all members of the Regional executive Committee and other Ex-Officio members. For this purpose, the Ex-Officio Members shall pertain to those members of the AB-Youth Sector who shall be tasked to hold appointive positions of great importance to the council, they shall be appointed by the President and shall be subject to concurrence by the AB-RIYDC. The RIYDC shall be headed by the President. It shall be convened at least once every quarter. Special sessions of the AB-RIYDC may be called in accordance with the provision of this Constitution </li></ul>
  • 199. <ul><li>Section 2. REGIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. It shall be composed of the President, Executive Vice President, Six (6) Vice Presidents (Albay, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, Masbate, and Sorsogon), Secretary General, Deputy Secretary General, Treasurer, Assistant Treasurer, Two (2) Auditors, two (2) Public Relations Officers; and Six (6) Legal Affairs Officers, one for every province. It shall be responsible for the implementation of [programs and resolutions of the Council. It shall convene as often as necessary upon the call of the President or one-third (1/3) of its members. The Regional Executive Committee, through its Secretary General, shall be responsible or the day to day operations of the organization, coordinate and direct the activities of the different committees. It shall have the following powers and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>to decide on any matter within its jurisdiction and issue directives; </li></ul><ul><li>to issue statements in the name of the AB-Youth Sector; </li></ul><ul><li>to appoint a General Counsel for the group as well as other officers as the need may arise; </li></ul><ul><li>to designate temporary officers in the Regional Executive Committee to replace vacant positions until the Regional Council elects or designates a permanent replacements; </li></ul><ul><li>to call the Regional Executive Council to meeting; and </li></ul><ul><li>to create and supervise, through the Secretary General, the Technical Working Group and/or Regional Committee. </li></ul>
  • 200. <ul><li>ARTICLE VI </li></ul><ul><li>RIGHTS OF COUNCIL MEMBERS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Every member shall have the right to participate in all appropriate organizational undertakings, engage in discussions, deliberations and debates and lobby for opinions and positions. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Every member shall have the right to equal treatment in the organization, and protection irrespective of political party affiliation, sex, religion, and economic and social status. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. Every member shall have the right to all information and access to all records about the organization and its program of activities. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE V </li></ul><ul><li>ORGANIZATIONAL TASKS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. To organize and consolidate local young Youth Leaders and Organizations regionwide to advance the interest of our youth in particular and the people in general. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. To promote and work for the legislative measures pushing for the rights and interests of our youth: </li></ul><ul><li>quality education; </li></ul>
  • 201. <ul><li>accessible sports and recreation; </li></ul><ul><li>progressive culture and arts; </li></ul><ul><li>decent jobs; </li></ul><ul><li>alternative livelihood </li></ul><ul><li>humane and peaceful environment; and </li></ul><ul><li>freedom of speech and expression. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. To work for a clean, honest and service-oriented government. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. To foster unity and cooperation among all the local youth organizations, national youth organizations, non-government organizations and international youth organizations, people’s organizations and other related institutions for local autonomy and development and youth empowerment. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5. To provide a cohesive force that will embody the sentiments and aspirations of the youth in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 6. To serve as a forum of discussion and feedback mechanism on policies affecting local government units and the youth sector in Bicol region. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 7. To encourage youth and people’s participation in local government administration in order to promote united and concerted action for the attainment of regionwide development goals. </li></ul>
  • 202. <ul><li>Section 8. To serve as a forum for crystallizing and expressing ideas and articulating the stand and position of the Organization on important local and national issues, seeking the necessary assistance of the local and national government, and providing the private sector, non-governmental organizations, people’s organizations, and the academe avenues of cooperation in the promotion of the welfare of the youth sector. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 9. To ensure proper and efficient organizational and structural mechanism to realize the Organization’s programs and objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE VI </li></ul><ul><li>DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF COUNCIL MEMBERS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Every member shall uphold and abide by the Constitution and By-laws of the AB-RIYDC and implement plans and policies agreed upon by the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Every member is required to attend appropriate organizational meetings and other AB-RIYDC undertakings. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. Every member is required to pay organizational dues and to extend material, financial and other forms of support of the AB-RIYDC to ensure an active and dynamic organization. </li></ul>
  • 203. <ul><li>Section 4. Every member must preserve the integrity of the AB-RIYDC and must not indulge in activities or take actions detrimental to the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5. Every member must maintain and develop the spirit of camaraderie in the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE VIII </li></ul><ul><li>POWERS AND FUNCTIONS OF OFFICERS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. The President. The President shall be the chief executive officer of the organization. He/she shall preside in all the meetings of the Regional Assembly, the Regional Council, and the Regional Executive Committee. He/she shall be the primary spokesperson of the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. The Executive Vice President. The Executive Vice President shall exercise all powers and perform all duties of the President as such during the incapacity or absence of the latter. He/she shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to him/her by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul>
  • 204. <ul><li>Section 3. The Vice Presidents (6). The Six (6) Vice Presidents shall be the Co-head of the Six (6) major committees namely: Political Affairs, Membership and Education, Finance, Public Information, Grievance and Arbitration, and Electoral Affairs. The Vice Presidents shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to them by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. The Secretary General. The Secretary General shall head the Secretariat. He/she shall take charge of the monitoring of the work and operations of the standing committees. He/she shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to him/her by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5. The Deputy Secretary General. The Deputy Secretary General shall exercise all powers and perform all duties of the Secretary General during the incapacity and absence of the latter. He/She shall assist the Secretary General in the implementation and monitoring of the AB-RIYDC programs and operations. He/she shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to him/her by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 6. The Treasurer. The Treasurer shall take charge of all financial matters of the AB-Youth. He/she shall head the Finance Committee. He/she shall keep all the money and other valuables of the organization in such bank or banks as the Regional Council may designate. He/she shall keep and take charge of the book of accounts, which shall be open to inspection by or all members of the Regional Council or the deputized auditing firm/auditor whenever required. He/she must submit a regular financial report to the Reg ional Council . He/she shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to him/her by the Regional Council. </li></ul>
  • 205. <ul><li>Section 7. The Assistant Treasurer. He/she shall exercise all functions and perform all duties of the Treasurer during the latter’s incapacity and absence. He/she shall also assist the Treasurer in the discharge of his/her duties and functions. The Assistant Treasurer shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to him/her by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 8. The Auditors. The Auditors shall take charge in the auditing of all financial transactions of the AB-Youth. They shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to them by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council.. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 9. The Public Relations Officers. The Public Relations Officers shall take charge of the publicity and information work of the organization. They shall head the Publicity and Information Committee. They shall also take charge of the official publication of the organization, “ Aquing Bicolnon ”. They shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to them by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council . </li></ul><ul><li>Section 10. The Legal Affairs Officers (one legal officer per province in Bicol region). The Legal Affairs Officers shall take charge of all the legal matters and affairs of the organization. They shall perform such other duties that may be assigned to them by the Regional Executive Committee and the Regional Council. </li></ul>
  • 206. <ul><li>ARTICLE IX </li></ul><ul><li>THE STANDING COMMITTEES AND THE SECRETARIAT </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Finance Committee . The Finance Committee shall be headed by the Treasurer. It shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven qualified members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for all matters pertaining to raising of funds, disbursements, budget, properties, and livelihood projects; </li></ul><ul><li>Submit regular financial report to the organization; </li></ul><ul><li>Take charge of all financial matters of the organization; and </li></ul><ul><li>Make all financial records available at anytime for periodic assessment and audit. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Public Information Committee . The Public Information Committee shall be headed by the Public Relations Officers and shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven qualified members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Implement the Regional policies and programs of the AB-RIYDC on information dissemination and publicity; and </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate the use of the press, the tri-media and other forms of communication to propagate the objectives, programs, and activities of the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. Membership and Education Committee. The membership committee shall be headed by one of the Vice-Presidents, shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul>
  • 207. <ul><li>Ensure the vigorous and systematic expansion and consolidation of the organization; </li></ul><ul><li>Propose policies pertaining to membership; and </li></ul><ul><li>Take charge of the education and training program of the organization; </li></ul><ul><li>Undertake researches and studies on different issues and human resource development; and </li></ul><ul><li>Make regular reports to the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. Political Affairs Committee . The Political Affairs Committee shall be headed by one of the Vice Presidents, shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven qualified members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Take charge of Local, National and international Political relations work; </li></ul><ul><li>Expand and consolidate contacts in the international community; </li></ul><ul><li>Propose programs and policies on local, national and international political work; and </li></ul><ul><li>Make regular reports to the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5. Electoral Affairs Committee. The Electoral Affairs Committee shall be headed by one of the Vice Presidents, shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven qualified members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Propose policies and guidelines on both internal and external electoral matters; </li></ul><ul><li>Establish links with existing political parties or groups engaged in electoral struggles; and </li></ul><ul><li>Make regular reports to the organization. </li></ul>
  • 208. <ul><li>Section 6. Legal Affairs Committee . The Legal Affairs Committee shall be headed by one of the Legal Affairs Officers to be chosen by the Regional Council , shall be composed of a minimum of three to a maximum of seven qualified members, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Take charge of the legal matters of the organization; </li></ul><ul><li>Propose policies and guidelines on legal affairs of the organization; and </li></ul><ul><li>Make regular reports to the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 7. Secretariat . The Secretariat shall be headed by the Secretary General, shall be composed of an executive director, regular staff members, authorized representatives or liaisons of every standing committee, and qualified volunteers, and shall have the following duties and functions: </li></ul><ul><li>Take charge of the technical aspect of the implementation of the policies, programs and activities of the organization; </li></ul><ul><li>Supervise the operations of the Regional Office; </li></ul><ul><li>Make regular reports to the organization; and </li></ul><ul><li>Perform such other tasks and functions as may be assigned by the Regional Executive Committee, the Regional Council, by the Standing Committees or by the Secretary General. </li></ul>
  • 209. <ul><li>ARTICLE X </li></ul><ul><li>ON ELECTIONS, OFFICE DECISIONS AND MEETINGS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Elections. The following shall form part of the guidelines for election proceedings in the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>The Regional Executive Committee members shall be elected at large by the AB Youth Sector Assembly except for the Six (6) Vice Presidents, who shall be elected by their respective geographical groups, the Legal Affairs Officers who are to be appointed by the National President subject to the concurrence of the Regional Council. The Legal Affairs Officers shall be members of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines in good standing, or in the absence thereof, any member who is graduate of the Bachelor of Laws or any member of AB Youth Sector. </li></ul><ul><li>A member is qualified to run for one position only. </li></ul><ul><li>All Territorial and Sub-Sectoral Representatives are to be elected at large by their respective assemblies. </li></ul><ul><li>A quorum shall be constituted by a simple majority attendance of the duly registered AB Youth Sector members aged 15 to 35 years old. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Term of Office. All officers shall serve the organization for a period of three (3) years, unless sooner removed from office for cause or have died, resigned, or permanently incapacitated, except in the case of Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) Representative who shall be co-terminus with his/her respective terms of office as local government officials and shall continue to hold office regardless of changes in Regional Council leadership. Provided, however, that he/she shall continue to hold office until their successors shall have been duly elected and qualified. </li></ul>
  • 210. <ul><li>Section 3. Decisions. The following shall guide the decision-making processes in the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>The rule of a simple majority shall be the basis of decisions to be arrived at all levels. </li></ul><ul><li>A motion for reconsideration, in order to be granted shall, likewise, require a simple majority vote. </li></ul><ul><li>A quorum shall be constituted by a simple majority attendance of all the duly elected/appointed Members Regional Executive Committee or Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. Meetings. The following shall serve as guides to organizational meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Meetings to be held other than the regular ones specified earlier in this Constitution and By-Laws may be classified as special meetings or emergency meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to the above-mentioned provisions , special or emergency meetings may be called by one-third of the members of the organizational body concerned. </li></ul><ul><li>The Regional Executive Committee, by a majority vote of all its members , can call for special meetings of either the Regional Council or the National Assembly. </li></ul>
  • 211. <ul><li>ARTICLE XI </li></ul><ul><li>FUND </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Funds. The funds of the organization shall be derived from membership fee, annual dues, special assessment of members, donations or other benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Fees and Dues. Every member of the organization shall, in addition to the membership fee, pay annual dues and/or assessment that may be imposed by the organization from time to time. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. Disbursements. Withdrawal from the funds of the organization, whether by check or any other procedure, shall be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by the President. If necessary, the Regional Council may designate other signatories. </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE XII </li></ul><ul><li>RECALL, REMOVAL AND SUSPENSION FROM THE ORGANIZATION </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Recall. Any officer or an individual of the general membership of the organization may be recalled anytime for loss of confidence in him/her by the ABV Youth General Assembly by a simple majority vote there being a quorum . </li></ul>
  • 212. <ul><li>Section 2. Removal and Suspension from Office. Any Officer of the organization may be suspended or removed form office during his/her term on the following grounds: </li></ul><ul><li>Absenteeism; </li></ul><ul><li>Dishonesty; </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect of duty; </li></ul><ul><li>Abandonment of office; </li></ul><ul><li>Misconduct in office; </li></ul><ul><li>Abuse of position; </li></ul><ul><li>Conviction an offense involving moral turpitude; </li></ul><ul><li>Receiving and/or soliciting for personal use of fee, gift or other valuable things in the course of his/her official duties and conduct prejudicial to the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>In case of suspension or removal from office , two-thirds (2/3) vote of all the members of the Regional Council , or two-thirds vote of those present there being a quorum of the respective. </li></ul><ul><li>The Regional Council shall promulgate the rules and regulations which shall govern the proceedings. There is abandonment of office if the incumbent fails or refuses without lawful cause to enter upon the discharge of his/her duties within the period of three (3) consecutive months from the time he ceases or neglects to perform his/her duties. </li></ul>
  • 213. <ul><li>ARTICLE XIII </li></ul><ul><li>ORGANIZATION SEAL </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Form. The organization seal shall be in such form and design as may be determined by the AB-Regional Integrated Youth Development Council (AB-RIYDC) . </li></ul><ul><li>ARTICLE XIV </li></ul><ul><li>GENERAL PROVISIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. No officer or his duly authorized representative shall receive personal remuneration for services rendered to the organization unless otherwise authorized by specific decision of the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. The name of the organization shall not be used for unjust, unlawful or immoral ends. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. No contribution either in cash or in kind, shall be solicited by any member except for just and reasonable purposes to be authorized by their respective organizational bodies. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4. All members shall defend the AB-RIYDC Constitution and By-Laws at all times. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5. This Constitution and By-Laws shall be officially promulgated in Filipino and English. </li></ul>
  • 214. <ul><li>ARTICLE XV </li></ul><ul><li>AMENDMENTS AND REVISIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1. Any amendment to or revision of this Constitution and By-Laws can only be introduced every Annual Congress </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2. Any amendment to, or revision of this Constitution and By-Laws may be proposed by any AB Youth-Sector Member on the occasion of the Annual Congress during the plenary, or through an Omnibus Amendment/Revision prepared by the Regional Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3. Any amendment to or revision of this Constitution and By-Laws shall take effect a month after when ratified by a majority of the votes cast during the AB Regional Assembly there being a quorum. </li></ul><ul><li>APPROVED AND ADOPTED. May 28, 2008 at Sorsogon City, Philippines. </li></ul>
  • 215. Conclusion
  • 216. &nbsp;
  • 217. &nbsp;
  • 218. Recommendation
  • 219. AB-Youth Recommendations: <ul><li>Establishment of a Regional Integrated Youth Development Center that will serve as the venue for youth activities and affairs for Bicol region. It has auditorium, library, museum, (where the awards and recognition of the Bicolano youth will be preserved and displayed), hostel, conference rooms and office for Regional Integrated Youth Development Council (RIYDC). The Center is run by the Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Issuance of an Executive Order by the President urging the LGUs of Bicol region to adopt the Aquing Bicolnon-Regional Integrated Youth Development Plan 2008-2013. </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of the Aquing Bicolnon-Regional Integrated Youth Development Council’s Multi-Media program for the networking activities with local and international youth and youth serving organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Printing and distribution of the Aquing Bicolnon-Regional Integrated Youth Development Plan 2008-2013 to all youth sub-sectors’ organizations (ISY,OSY,WY, YSN,SKs) in Bicol region for free in partnership with DepEd, CHED,DOLE,DSWD,DILG &amp; LGUs </li></ul><ul><li>Budget allocation for the implementation of the identified youth programs, projects and activities for the 5-year plan </li></ul>
  • 220. &nbsp;
  • 221. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
  • 222. &nbsp;
  • 223. &nbsp;
  • 224. &nbsp;
  • 225. &nbsp;
  • 226. Thank You!

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