Hale kula climate stewards presentation 07.12
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Hale kula climate stewards presentation 07.12

on

  • 1,295 views

Presentation to HKES Sea Urchins Project teachers by Dr. Rick Jones of University of Hawaii, West Oahu on July 23, 2012

Presentation to HKES Sea Urchins Project teachers by Dr. Rick Jones of University of Hawaii, West Oahu on July 23, 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,295
Views on SlideShare
1,291
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
1

2 Embeds 4

http://www.edmodo.com 3
http://www.docseek.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Climate change is the defining environmental issue of our time, with overwhelming trends and pervasive impacts on society and the environment. The nation is already facing the impacts of climate change. NOAA plays a key role in understanding and predicting the magnitude of global change and must ensure that critical information is delivered to the public including our youngest citizens. 1 NOAA has a broad mandate to educate the public about ocean, coastal, Great Lakes, and atmospheric science and stewardship through the America COMPETES Act of 2007. As a science agency with an education mandate, NOAA is committed to work with education stakeholders to increase the environmental and climate literacy of the next generation and to support a sustainable, resilient and green economy for America’s future. Climate Stewards will support a comprehensive education program focused on the nation’s formal and informal educators and the formation of partnerships between NOAA and education organizations to develop a society that is environmentally knowledgeable and responsible. The capacity of America's educational system to create a 21st century workforce is crucial to economic competitiveness and national security. Climate Stewards provides a cohesive plan for local, state, and regional education partners to work with NOAA in actively responding to environmental challenges and to inspire our youth to pursue careers in science, technology and engineering and mathematics (STEM). It will provide educators and student’s opportunities to learn about the state of the science and career paths, develop core competencies, and meet scientists, engineers, and technicians that play critical roles in understanding and responding to climate change.   1 NOAA Annual Guidance Memorandum, May 10, 2009
  • The Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) provides opportunities for local, state, and regional education partners to work with NOAA in responding to environmental challenges and inspire our youth to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). CSEP brings NOAA science and education efforts together in a cohesive plan to provide educational opportunities and rewards for environmental stewardship actions. Environmental stewardship actions include things like Climate Stewards educating themselves and others, as well as working within their communities to reduce their carbon footprints or develop plans to “go green.” The Essential Principles of Climate Literacy is one document used to communicate important information to program participants so they may know and understand about Earth’s climate, impacts of climate change, and approaches to adaptation or mitigation. The guide promotes greater climate literacy by providing an educational framework of principles and concepts. This contents of this document was developed, agreed to, and reviewed by multiple Federal Agencies and NGOS.  
  • Our Program: Has a National reach - 140 educators located in 40 States and the District of Columbia Serves Formal/Informal Educators Participants teach elementary school through university. Informal educators are active in nature centers, science centers and zoos Provides Extensive Professional Development Opportunities. Uses Distance Learning Technology and Social Media Tools in Support of this Learning Community. Is engaged in a Formal Evaluation of Learning (Participants and their audiences)
  • Project Goals: Provide educators with sustained professional development, STEM and geography -based teaching and collaborative tools, digital content resources and compelling contextual-based teaching applications that align with national standards for targeted content areas. Multiple e-learning professional development tools, web-based seminars, conference symposia, online classes, and workshops will engage the participating educators to: Provide deeper content understanding and/or competence and confidence in teaching climate science. Strengthen the use of problem-based learning and the inquiry process with online scientifically up-to-date education and data resources, and support for designing and implementing a stewardship project Learn real world and practical applications and careers of climate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and geography from NOAA scientists, researchers, and engineers. Learn how to use technology tools and data Web sites to support classroom and field investigations. Use field-based, hands-on experiences at NOAA’s field sites and protected areas, or other local natural places. Provide ALL students of educators the opportunity to explore climate-related STEM and geography in a variety of engaging and interactive climate contexts through educator developed Stewardship Project plans that will accomplish one or more of the following: Infuse knowledge of climate science and related STEM careers into formal and informal educational venues. Develop a local community project involving students and/or the public in climate stewardship actions. Plan special events in their school, community, or organization to highlight climate stewardship and green action. Encourage use of problem-based learning and active investigations. Learn about and/or use local natural areas and special places. Highlight and promote STEM careers, and give students experience in career-related roles through their stewardship projects.
  • Climate Stewards Education Program – Leadership Team Members National Ocean Service – Administrative lead (http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/) Climate Office (http://www.cpo.noaa.gov/) National Weather Service (http://www.weather.gov/) National Marine Sanctuaries (http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/) National Estuarine Research Reserves (http://estuaries.gov/) Coral Reef Conservation Program (http://coralreef.noaa.gov/) National Marine Fisheries Service (http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/) NESDIS (http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/)
  • NOAA Provides: Collaborative program leadership Access/training in the use of data resources, digital tools, innovative technology applications Wide array of professional development opportunities Access to NOAA scientists and education specialists Communications network Formal program evaluation
  • Kate Cobb Stewardship Project Elementary School Teacher in Prince Georges County My students planting, gardening, etc. The seeds were planted in the classrooms of all of the second grade classes (about 120 students), their growth was recorded and used for math applications.  We also incorporated the Lorax and journaling.  This week the students are taking their carbon footprint. My team and I have decided to use the Lorax by Dr. Seuss as the theme for our garden.  There is a project called the Lorax Project that provides some resources for students and teachers to promote Environmental Education.  We are going to focus our efforts towards reducing the carbon footprint of each of our students.  There is an online quiz students and adults can take to see how they compare to the world and the rest of the school (I am below average!).  Then we will figure out ways that we can reduce our carbon footprint and what that will mean for the climate. 
  • Climate change is the defining environmental issue of our time, with overwhelming trends and pervasive impacts on society and the environment. The nation is already facing the impacts of climate change. NOAA plays a key role in understanding and predicting the magnitude of global change and must ensure that critical information is delivered to the public including our youngest citizens. 1 NOAA has a broad mandate to educate the public about ocean, coastal, Great Lakes, and atmospheric science and stewardship through the America COMPETES Act of 2007. As a science agency with an education mandate, NOAA is committed to work with education stakeholders to increase the environmental and climate literacy of the next generation and to support a sustainable, resilient and green economy for America’s future. Climate Stewards will support a comprehensive education program focused on the nation’s formal and informal educators and the formation of partnerships between NOAA and education organizations to develop a society that is environmentally knowledgeable and responsible. The capacity of America's educational system to create a 21st century workforce is crucial to economic competitiveness and national security. Climate Stewards provides a cohesive plan for local, state, and regional education partners to work with NOAA in actively responding to environmental challenges and to inspire our youth to pursue careers in science, technology and engineering and mathematics (STEM). It will provide educators and student’s opportunities to learn about the state of the science and career paths, develop core competencies, and meet scientists, engineers, and technicians that play critical roles in understanding and responding to climate change.   1 NOAA Annual Guidance Memorandum, May 10, 2009

Hale kula climate stewards presentation 07.12 Hale kula climate stewards presentation 07.12 Presentation Transcript

  • NOAA Climate Stewards in Hawaii: A Case Study in Teaching Climate Science
  • Many teachers have trouble talking about climate change in their classroomsDiscussions of climate change have become politicizedSome teachers are not sure of the science themselvesLike any “hot button” issue, the loudest voice may not be supported by the data.58% of US Citizens accepted climate change as real last year (Pew Research Center poll, 2011)More than 25% of teachers reported having arguments over this issue (NESTA Survey of Earth Science Teachers, 2011)
  • Down from 77% in 2006 from: Inman, M. (2012) 3 View slide
  • A need for teaching climate change in the classroomsYale survey finds that even those teens who accept that humanity is heating up the planet are often confused about the reasons (Inman, 2012) View slide
  • NOAA Climate Stewards PurposeBuild Climate Literacy so educators can:• understand the concepts of climate•assess the scientifically credibility ofinformation•make informed and responsibledecisions, and initiate actions in thecommunity
  • NOAA Climate Stewards ProgramIs all about providing scienceOffers mini grants (Hale Kula received $500.00)Offers travel support for Climate Stewards to attend professional development opportunitiesEstablished six regional groups with a goal of fostering regular communication and collaboration among educators within those regionsFocus projects in your communitiesFocus projects in citizen science 6
  • projects in your communities Reusable Bags School/Community Garden 7
  • projects in citizen science Sea Urchin Science Sea Urchin Science in the classroom on the reef 8
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery: Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards Program Based on an earlier research project conducted on a Kaneohe Bay patch reef that had been cleared of invasive seaweed using the “Super Sucker” and then had native collector urchins placed and monitored to see how well they were able to control the invasive algae. This project originates from the $500.00 Climate Stewards mini grant that focuses on continued improvement of the health of Oahu’s coral reefs. Image source: ryanphotographic.com This year, Hale Kula teachers agree to participate by housing salt water aquariums in five classrooms. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources agreed to provide small urchins to the school for students to raise and to actively engage in scientific research. 9
  • The “Super Sucker”An underwater vacuum that “sucks”invasive algae right off the reef! 10
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery: Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards ProgramIs all about providing science: Prior to this project, teachers from Hale Kula, Wheeler and Solomon Elementary schools engaged in active professional development opportunities including monthly workshops focused on climate change and corals. One full day experience at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology on Coconut Island with Dr. Fenny Cox 11 Image source: c.weiner Image source: hmbi.hawaii.edu
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery: Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards ProgramIs all about providing science: On site teacher professional development, focused on the physical properties of water and what happens to sea level as ocean water warms.As the Earth warms, its waters will also expand slightly.As Earth’s atmospheric temperature rises from globalwarming, the oceans will warm and sea levels will risefrom the expansion of the water, as well as from theaddition of water from melted land-based glaciers . 12
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery:Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards ProgramIs all about providing science: Professional Development focused on the chemistry of ocean water and the impact changes in the chemistry have on marine life.As CO2 increases in the atmosphere the pHof the ocean decreases leading to oceanacidification.Acidic ocean waters stress and react with thecarbonate skeleton of corals. 13
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery: Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards ProgramProject Goals:Through Comprehensive evaluation we will measure:  whether the program increases environmental and climate literacy of the teachers and the students  whether the program increases the number and impact of climate stewardship activities at the school and in the community 14 Image source: hawaiiarmyweekly.com Image source: ryanphotographic.com
  • Sea Urchin’s for Coral Recovery: Hale Kula’s Climate Stewards ProgramProject Goals Continued:Increased control of invasive algae on the reefs of Kaneohe BayContinued participation of Hale Kula and addition of schools in the Scholfield/Wheeler Complex and then to other schools in Central Oahu and the Leeward CoastSchool and community adoption of project management after year five to sustain climate stewardship activities 15 Image source: ryanphotographic.com
  • National Climate Stewards Project • 140 educators in 40 States and DC • Formal Educators - elementary through university • Informal educators - nature centers, science centers and zoos. • Climate Stewards Wiki
  • NOAA Climate Stewards Process
  • National Leadership Team
  • Additional Professional Development Opportunities for other Teachers Free Online Courses andEducation Conferences, Workshops, Workshopsand Webinars From the American Meteorologicale.g. Climate Change Here and Now: Impacts Society (AMS) and funded by NOAA,on Pacific Islands, Coastlines, and Ocean NASA, and the Navy - Space is availableNASA’s Aquarius: Ocean concepts in the for the fall 2012 cohortclassroom Webinar Series
  • Stewardship in Action!
  • National Contacts Peg Steffen peg.steffen@noaa.gov NOAA’s National Ocean Service Communications & Education Division Bruce Moravchik bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov NOAA’s National Ocean Service Communications & Education Division Hawaii Contacts  Richard Jones rmjones7@hawaii.edu University of Hawaii – West Oahu Education Division  Maggie Prevenas prevenas@hawaiiantel.net Kalama Intermediate School, Maui 7th Grade Science 21
  • NOAA Climate Stewards Impacts Image source: mprevenas "It is better to teach people in advance about the environment, than to reverse the damage they do..." 6th grade student
  • Climate Stewards