New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning

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With new online platforms offering opportunities for teaching and learning released almost on a daily basis it can be challenging to find out which is best suited to your teaching and learning needs, and how to choose which platform to use and when.

This session explores new and emerging developments in online digital media technologies (like YouTube, Facebook, Scoop.it), how they can enrich learning, teaching and assessment, and presents practical selection methods. Independent Learning Advisor, Theo Kuechel gives an overview of the types of technologies currently available, Music Technologies Lecturer, Adam Richards shows how he and colleagues at Bridgend College, Wales are using Facebook to support teaching and learning and JISC Digital Media Advisor, Tim O’Riordan proposes a novel approach to selecting digital technologies for learning.

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  • JDM are a publically funded JISC service in the UK. We offer advice on all types of digital media which at the moment stands at digital video, audio and images. We serve UK Higher and Further Education and Skills. What we aim to do is help the community help each other. As it’s a fast paced, quickly developing area - we don’t claim to have all the answers. We like to get people who know through doing and arrange for them to talk to people who want to do the same kind of things. The services we offer include training (hands on workshops), advisory documents (and these are on our website), and we do social networking – we blog regularly and use our flickr channel, twitter, youtube, vimeo, facebook and of course edmediashare.
  • We provide a helpdesk service which really puts us in touch on a one to one, day to day basis with the community of people who are using digital media in education. The helpdesk service is free, it operates 5 days a week, we respond to queries with 12 hours and it covers the whole lifecycle of digital media – so that includes creation, management, and dissemination. It’s a big topic – everything from hands-on which button do I press on hardware or software all the way through to policy making, long term preservation issues and collection management.Image Credit: http://thenounproject.com/noun/inbox/#icon-No406
  • Three key areas involved in integrating digital media
  • A stated aim of the government is, ‘To ensure there is a clear sector-owned policy to support outstanding teaching and learning in FE, including making full use of the potential of technology.My thinking is that we briefly look at how use of video in education is changing - from a form that  unchangeable, didactic, exposition of learning outcomes to a mutable and dynamic media that affords a variety of uses and ‘readings’. Although video still has a role in imparting knowledge in a structured, linear mode, new online platforms are emerging that present opportunities to extend the use of the medium into far more areas of the curriculum that has hitherto been possible.We look at three key areas involved in integrating digital media tools into practice - evaluating the tools themselves, pedagogical considerations and the technical/legal side of things - what I’m calling (for want of a better word) ‘implementation’.Why important...Digital Literacy Agendadeveloping students’ capacity for successful study, employment and participation in a digital society through curriculum innovationdeveloping the capacity of institutions to meet the needs of students and to build resilience in a rapidly changing educational landscape.Many tools available and emerging - we can’t try everything, but need to make a good guess as to what may be useful, and develop new methods of supporting learning.
  • Move on to look at pedagogy and implementation
  • What do we want students to do?Look critically at what the services are offering and at how you use that in teaching and learning - personal solution.Neilsen’s Usability Heuristic? Nielsen, J.: Heuristic evaluation: How-to. http://www.useit.com/papers/heuristic/heuristic_evaluation.html
  • LINK for chat window - JISC Legal Using Facebook: http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/ManageContent/ViewDetail/ID/2114/Facing-up-to-Facebook-A-Guide-for-FE-and-HE-02-August-2011.aspx AOC: IT staff face difficulties in reconciling security with consistent access necessary for teaching and learning. The research suggests that there is much greater availability to staff of web based applications and social media from within the College network than that allowed to students.AOC: Where there are concerns about security they focus on the use of social media and non approved applications. The use of social media and web 2.0 applications, despite the restrictions imposed by the requirements of secure College systems is increasing, but their use tends to focus on the delivery of student services rather that the delivery of the curriculum. There does appear therefore to be a tension between continued investment in the infrastructure that would allow for the greater use social media and web 2.0 applications and the development of procedures and protocols that would reassure managers and teachers that its use is appropriate and secure.AOC: all Colleges are required to submit data returns for the Individual Learner Record (ILR) and thus require software that enables them to do so in the required manner. What about Personal Learner Record (PLR)?Technical issuesBrowser/mobile device support (Wimba with Flash in Chrome?)InteroperabilityIn-house supportOwnershipInstitutional control over content hosted by a third party  (some real concerns here)Who owns tutors/learners content?How is content used by tool provider?Reliability of serviceEase of record keepingReusability of content producedPlatform stability, accessibility, contracts, IPR, where is data held - (US/European servers)? Ning - free, then fee required. Some just disappear. What do we want students to do?Look critically at what the services are offering and at how you use that in teaching and learning - personal solution.
  •  LINK for chat window: Nielsen’s Usability Heuristic? Nielsen, J.: Heuristic evaluation: How-to. http://www.useit.com/papers/heuristic/heuristic_evaluation.htmlH1 Visibility of system statusThe system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.H2 Match between system and the real worldThe system should speak the users' language, with words, phrases and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order.H3 User control and freedomUsers often choose system functions by mistake and will need a clearly marked "emergency exit" to leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. Support undo and redo.H4 Consistency and standardsUsers should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing. Follow platform conventions.H5 Error preventionEven better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation option before they commit to the action.H6 Recognition rather than recallMinimize the user's memory load by making objects, actions, and options visible. The user should not have to remember information from one part of the dialogue to another. Instructions for use of the system should be visible or easily retrievable whenever appropriate.H7 Flexibility and efficiency of useAccelerators -- unseen by the novice user -- may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor frequent actions.H8 Aesthetic and minimalist designDialogues should not contain information which is irrelevant or rarely needed. Every extra unit of information in a dialogue competes with the relevant units of information and diminishes their relative visibility.H9 Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errorsError messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), precisely indicate the problem, and constructively suggest a solution.H10 Help and documentationEven though it is better if the system can be used without documentation, it may be necessary to provide help and documentation. Any such information should be easy to search, focused on the user's task, list concrete steps to be carried out, and not be too large.
  • Does the interface support all the tasks expected by the user? Are there conflicts in the functionality of interface? Does functionality change the nature of the underlying task?
  • LINK for chat window:http://www.psy.gla.ac.uk/~steve/best/chickering.html + http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.htmlOnline tools can really drive high expectations – sharing good practice – but it can also drive down engagement so that students can easy do the minimum (quote from my dissertation)
  • LINK for chat window:http://www.psy.gla.ac.uk/~steve/best/chickering.html + http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.htmlOnline tools can really drive high expectations – sharing good practice – but it can also drive down engagement so that students can easy do the minimum (quote from my dissertation)
  • LINK for chat window http://dial-e.net/ http://misc.jisc.ac.uk/JISC/framework.php & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom's_Taxonomy• Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Creation(creating a project or artefact)
  • • Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Creation (creating a project or artefact/re-using content)modified
  • http://dial-e.net/ http://misc.jisc.ac.uk/JISC/framework.php & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom's_Taxonomy• Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Re-use (creating a project or artefact)
  • LINK for chat window: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom's_Taxonomy• Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Creation(creating a project or artefact)
  • http://dial-e.net/ http://misc.jisc.ac.uk/JISC/framework.php & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom's_Taxonomy• Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Re-use (creating a project or artefact)
  • http://dial-e.net/ http://misc.jisc.ac.uk/JISC/framework.php & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom's_Taxonomy• Stimulus (stimulating interest and engagement)• Investigation (exploring concepts and processes)• Analysis (exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives)• Re-use (creating a project or artefact)
  • Its where the students liveTablets, phones, desktop computersGroup focus much easier than in the College VLE
  • So personal and focussed on the courseNo students who aren’t using system
  • Media so important which means the Creative Industry makes them more receptive and use it in a more diverse wayShare images and showsMedia showcasesShare composition
  • Follow-up from stuff which has emerged in the class – students as researcher, not tutor-led because of the Facebook interaction.
  • Twitter – questions or comments use the hashtag.Survey Monkey – Our next workshop at Bristol is the BTEC Professional Certificate in Digital Imagingwhich runs for three days from 21 January next yearhttp://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/training/event/btec-professional-certificate-in-digital-imaging
  • New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning

    1. 1. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    2. 2. JISC Digital Media Who we are• Publicly funded JISC Service in UK• Advises on all aspects of digital media• Help the community to help each other• Services: training, advice documents, social media & helpdesk www.edmediashare.org
    3. 3. What we do Helpdesk info@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk• Free• Monday to Friday• Respond within 12 hours• Covers whole digital media life cycle (creation, management and dissemination) www.edmediashare.org
    4. 4. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    5. 5. • Do you use online tools?• What tools do you use? Image: Henry Ryder, from The Noun Project www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    6. 6. Key areas ToolsPedagogy Implementation www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    7. 7. Schedule• Digital Media Ecosystem - Theo Kuechel• Selection Criteria – Tim O’Riordan• Facebook for Learning – Adam Richards & Deri Roberts• Q+A www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    8. 8. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    9. 9. Towards a DigitalEcosystem for Learning Image: RSA Animate:The Power of Networks : http://youtu.be/nJmGrNdJ5Gw
    10. 10. Focusing on individual tools or applications -unlikely to lead to integrated and effectiveuse of technology Image Credit: jaxxon http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaxxon/3196395750/ CC
    11. 11. Seeing the big picture - helps us ask the rightquestions about how we use technology• Why am I using this Tool/Technology/Space?• What does it add?• What is the half life?• Progression or Sustainability Image Credit: Leo Gatzke http://www.flickr.com/photos/stabilo-boss/101793493/ CC
    12. 12. Technologies• (Online) MindMaps•Curation• YouTube Ecosystem• Why - Quick win Image Credit: faith goble http://www.flickr.com/photos/grafixer/3180236074/ CC
    13. 13. Mind Maps Image Credit: edmittance http://www.flickr.com/photos/edmittance/3079380191/ CC
    14. 14. Collaborative Thinking & Planning mindmeister.com (freemium model)
    15. 15. Curation: Managing Knowledge•Discover new educational resources&practice•Discover resources created by other teachers&students•Share resources discovered by teaching staff&students• Form new relationships with colleagues&peers•Build communities on subject or topic expertise•Curationis an important part of digital literacy
    16. 16. ThePhenomenon
    17. 17. Scoopit: Social Knowledge Building
    18. 18. John Sayers
    19. 19. Managing Video ECOSYSTEM
    20. 20. • Subscriptions• Playlists/Fav’s• Video Editor• Video Manager• History
    21. 21. Video Editor Generic time line based video editing tools tools Creative Commons Please consider making your uploads CC
    22. 22. Continually evolvingtoolset and capability
    23. 23. THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF A DIGITALECOSYSTEM FOR LEARNING
    24. 24. The Missing Essential Element is Conversation
    25. 25. Thank you ....
    26. 26. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    27. 27. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    28. 28. Key areas ToolsPedagogy Implementation www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    29. 29. Tool selectionSelect platform Will it work? www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    30. 30. Tool selectionTechnical Test www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    31. 31. Technical Test• Pragmatic Review• Neilsen Heuristics www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    32. 32. Technical Test Pragmatic Review• Interoperable (browser support)• Re-usable• Accessible (incl. access to data)• Reliable• Legal (contracts, IPR and data protection) www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    33. 33. Technical Test Nielsen Review www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    34. 34. Technical Test Neilsen Review• Does the interface support all tasks expected by the user?• Are there conflicts in the functionality of interface?• Does functionality change the underlying task? www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    35. 35. Tool selection Pedagogic Test www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    36. 36. Pedagogic Test Chickering & Gamson• Encourages contacts between students and faculty• Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students• Encourages active learning• Gives prompt feedback• Emphasizes time on task• Communicates high expectations• Respects diverse talents and ways of learning www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    37. 37. “...new technology easily supports a fragmented, informational view of knowledge…and is in danger of promulgating only that.” Diane Laurillard, Rethinking University Education, 2002, p227 www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    38. 38. Pedagogic Test Chickering & Gamson• Encourages contacts between students and faculty• Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students• Encourages active learning• Gives prompt feedback• Emphasizes time on task• Communicates high expectations• Respects diverse talents and ways of learning www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    39. 39. Tool selection What context? www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    40. 40. Tool selection Learning Design www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    41. 41. Learning Design Dial-e www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    42. 42. Learning Design Dial-e www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    43. 43. Learning Design Dial-e • stimulating interest and engagement • exploring concepts and processes • exploring textual qualities and alternative perspectives • creating a project or artefact www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    44. 44. Learning Design Dial-e & Bloom www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    45. 45. Learning Design Dial-e & Bloom www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    46. 46. Learning Design Dial-e & Bloom www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    47. 47. Tool selectionSelect platform Will it work? Technical Test Pedagogic Test What context? Learning Design Adopt platform www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    48. 48. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    49. 49. Facing reality in a Further Educationcontext – Using Facebook to create learning communities without the cost of a hosted solution
    50. 50. Bridgend College
    51. 51. The FE Context• Constrained resources in an FE context• FE delivery• How Facebook acted as a vehicle for achieving learning that was not possible otherwise
    52. 52. Memphis Trip Page
    53. 53. Why Social Networking?• Access 365 days a year• 24/7• Free• Embedded in their experience• Available on mobile and desktop devices• Direct Interaction and group focus
    54. 54. Social Intrusion• Managed by the tutor administrators, use of closed group• The groups are subject specific, not College based• No personal Facebook interaction – not friending students• Not in their direct interaction - its in group spaces• To date 100% of our students are facebook users
    55. 55. Creative Industry Specific
    56. 56. Better than face to face• Continuous learning outside the college• Enables follow-up discussion from class and Student led research• Options for students who don’t interact as well in face to face contexts
    57. 57. Student benefit The students’ perception has been that the group has improved the range and flexibility of communication and provided an effective hub for communicating and learning between the staff and learners – evidence of support“I found the group page a huge benefit, it enabled me to communicate with tutors and group members, it was a good source to contact members and share ideas”. Danni Kennedy student 2012
    58. 58. Risks and how to address them• Facebook group is part of induction week• Risks were avoided• To date all students have respected the groups• All tutors are group administrators• All students feel part of a unique, specialised environment
    59. 59. New Digital Media Ecosystems for Learning Tim O’Riordan Theo Kuechel Adam Richards & Deri Roberts JISC Digital Media Digital Media and Educational Bridgend Collegeinfo@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk Technology Research Consultant ARichards@bridgend.ac.uk theo.kuechel@gmail.com Image: Henry Ryder, from The Noun Project www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk
    60. 60. Join the discussion @jiscdigital #jdmsurgeryhttp://www.surveymonkey.com/s/19nov2012Recording: http://goo.gl/Nh6Ny www.edmediashare.org

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