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JISC BCE - Dissemination

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Presentation used to promote discussion around the way in which project disseminate their findings/outcomes.

Presentation used to promote discussion around the way in which project disseminate their findings/outcomes.

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  • <number>Knowledge transfer and exchange, innovation and employer engagement are all themes high on the government’s agenda, reflected by high profile reports such as Innovation Nation, the Science and Innovation Investment Framework 2004-14 and several key reviews including those by Sainsbury, Leitch and Foster. These are all drivers of national policy striving to position the UK effectively in a knowledge based economy, and shape the role of Universities and Colleges in both the economy and society. The aims of Business and Community engagement activity within this context are a more highly skilled workforce, a more efficient, dynamic and sustainable economy and a more cohesive, knowledge-enabled society.  The JISC User Needs Study identified the JISC Advisory Services as playing a key role in supporting BCE, through their specialist expertise, relationships \"at the coalface\" with staff and institutions, and their networks through representative bodies. The BCE Team was established within the advisory services in May08 to coordinate this activity as a coherent offering to BCE (and other existing JISC audiences) through the collaborative provision of 4 key projects within the JISC BCE programme, and more widely through developing and enhancing their resources and expertise in this area.  Day 1 Heralding Success(10 mins) - Responding to needs in the knowledge economy- Government/HEFCE/JISC Agenda, Drivers - Sainsbury/Leitch/InnovationNation- Economic climate, responsibility of HEI/FEIs in their community  - BCE Agenda, JISC BCE Programme- Role of the Advisory Services, \"coalface\" institutional support,relationships with representative bodies- BCE Team, role in BCE and the AS- 4 Projects, advisory service collaboration- working with comms and the programme, advisory group, JOS etc Some of this I'd hope to cover with simple diagrams rather than lots oftext  Day 2 The E in BCE(10 mins) - BCE-External partnerships/relationships, collaboration and serviceprovision- BCE functions, activities, roles- Institutional models, research focused, business facing etc- The role of intermediaries and representative bodies (other\"stakeholders\"?)- Advisory services linking \"traditional JISC audiences\" with BCE 
  • Focus on clear, simple messages that are easily understood Get the right message to the right audience. You can send the same message to different audiences, but make sure it’s relevant to each one Coordinate messages within and across programmes. Messages from a group of projects often have greater impact than messages from a single project Consult your programme manager about how your message fits in with over-arching themes for the programme Don’t build up unrealistic expectations at the start of the project <number>
  • Audience Think about who you want to reach and what they can do for your project. Identify the different individuals, groups, and organisations that will be interested in what you’re developing, particularly with respect to take-up at the end of the project. The stakeholder analysis2 identified people who will be affected by your project and whose support you need. Use dissemination to inform and engage stakeholders, and get them to buy into your work.  Consider the following audiences: Internal (e.g. your institution and/or the project consortium) – They supported the project bid, so keep them informed about what you’re doing. Use dissemination to make sure the project has a high profile and they buy into what you are developing. JISC development programmes – Share your results with other projects, within the programme and across programmes.  rogramme meetings (and cluster meetings) are an excellent opportunity to share what you’ve done and get feedback from projects doing similar work or facing similar problems and issues. External stakeholders – Think about who might take up your outputs and the stakeholders that can help you to ‘make it happen’. These might be teachers, researchers, librarians, publishers, online hosts, etc. Think of opportunities to engage with them like conferences. The community – There may be much to share with the wider education and research communities. For example, guidelines, methods, evaluation criteria, questionnaires, and what you learned generally. Think about who could learn from your knowledge and experience and share it in case studies, journal articles, etc. <number>
  • Raise awareness – let others know what you are doingInform – educate the communityEngage – get input/feedback from the communityPromote – ‘sell’ your outputs and results<number>
  • Methods There are a wide variety of dissemination methods3. The trick is to select the right one(s) to get your message to the target audience and achieve your purpose. Timing Decide when different dissemination activities will be most relevant. Messages will vary during the timeframe of the project. For example, at the start focus on awareness of your project, and at the end on ‘selling’ achievements. Also think about the time commitments of your target audience. There are periods in the academic year when it will be difficult to reach academic staff (e.g. at the start of the term or during examinations). Language Your project may be developing something that’s technically difficult and complex. In dissemination activities, use language appropriate for the target audience, and non-technical language where possible. This is particularly important for dissemination to stakeholders. They need to know what you’ve achieved and why it’s important. If you’re writing a piece for the institution newsletter, focus on clear messages in non-technical language that teachers and administrators will understand.  If you’re writing an article for a computer journal on the design and architecture of your system, use technical language and bring out the flowcharts and schematics.  <number>
  • Collaboration The dissemination strategy will ensure that the programme has a high profile, the community learns from its achievements, and outputs are embedded and taken up.  The programme manager will share the strategy with you early in the project and invite you to contribute ideas. Where the programme is structured by clusters, the clusters will be asked to brainstorm about ways to collaborate on dissemination. Thinking early in the programme about the ‘big picture’ will maximise the impact of dissemination and the sustainability of its outputs You will be asked to participate in programme and cluster dissemination activities. There are very selfish reasons for doing so. Firstly, initiatives at programme and cluster-level often have more impact than those at project-level. Colleagues in the field are more likely to attend a cluster workshop with six demos than a project workshop with one. A MLE InfoKit has more impact than a single case study. Secondly, it’s cost effective. Contribute your ideas on collaboration and participate in the activities that are planned<number>
  • For people to use knowledge to inform their work, they need to know that the knowledge exists and they need to be able to access it (Awareness). Once they have hold of it, they need to engage with ti in a way that results in their increased understanding of the issues in the context of their own work (Knowledge). They need to believe that it contains information that will help them to do their work better (Attitude). And finally, they need to take action that puts the knowledge to work (Behavior)<number>
  • For people to use knowledge to inform their work, they need to know that the knowledge exists and they need to be able to access it (Awareness). Once they have hold of it, they need to engage with ti in a way that results in their increased understanding of the issues in the context of their own work (Knowledge). They need to believe that it contains information that will help them to do their work better (Attitude). And finally, they need to take action that puts the knowledge to work (Behavior)<number>
  • Transcript

    • 1. Business and Community Engagement (BCE) From Dissemination to Sustainability Rob Allen, JISC Services BCE Manager 5 – 6 March 2009 Advocates and Change Agents, Dissemination, Transferability and Sustainability Joint Information Systems Committee Supporting education and research 12/03/2009 | slide 1
    • 2. Dissemination When – the timing How – the method http://www.sxc.hu/photo/945756 Why – the purpose To whom – the audience What you plan to disseminate – the message Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 3. Message http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1101776 http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1101775 Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 4. Audience Internal Other staff in http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1073466 the institution ? Common audiences? BCE External Practitioners Stakeholders JISC The Programmes Community Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 5. Purpose http://www.sxc.hu/photo/207291 Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 6. Method, Timing, Language  Lots of methods  Select the right method(s) to get your message to the target audience and achieve your purpose http://www.sxc.hu/photo/149741  Decide when different dissemination activities will be most relevant  Messages will vary during the timeframe of the project  Language – appropriate for the target audience, non-technical where possible – what you’ve achieved and why it’s important  Evaluate success – in planning the purpose of a dissemination activity, decide what you want to gain from it. Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 7. Collaboration and Sustainability  Profile of the programme, representing it – and what it stands for  The community learns from its achievements  Outputs are embedded and taken up  Your ideas how…  Programme and cluster activities http://www.sxc.hu/photo/91839 – More impact than at project level? – More attractive to an audience? – Cost effective Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 8. Sustainability and Enabling Change For people to use knowledge to inform their work they need to…  Know that the knowledge exists – be able to access it  Engage with it in a way that results – in their increased understanding – of the issues in the context of their own work  Believe that it contains information http://www.sxc.hu/photo/787898 – that will help them to do their work better  Take action that puts the knowledge to work Lloyd-Laney et al, 2003 Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 9. From Dissemination to Sustainability  To what extent can your project and its outputs – create awareness – encourage engagement with the knowledge – change attitudes and behaviour  Into the future, beyond the lifetime of your project  What mechanisms exist to enable the outputs to outlive the project?  And help achieve the programme outcomes?  What support is required? http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1094839 Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 10. JISC Business and Community Engagement Programme – Streams and Key Work-packages 1 - Supporting institutions in sustainable systems and ICT strategies for the enhanced management and exploitation of knowledge assets. 2 - Facilitate BCE collaboration and provision of service across and between institutions through enabling systems and technology. 3 - Supporting and guiding institutions in making the process and technological changes (driven by strategic goals) to sustain efficient, effective BCE. 4 - Enabling richer & more efficient, productive knowledge exchange & learning partnerships between institutions & BCE partners 5 - Ensuring internal change & education within JISC with aim of embedding BCE in its operations, in Innovation and Services 6 - Basis of evidence for investment and effectiveness of investment in JISC’s BCE activities and evaluate its effectiveness and impact Joint Information Systems Committee
    • 11. Interfaces Institutions Individuals Joint Information Systems Committee

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