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Mapping the Republic of Letters - Nicole Coleman, Stanford University
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Mapping the Republic of Letters - Nicole Coleman, Stanford University

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Presentation given at the JISC Geo Programme Meeting in London on Tuesday 29th November 2011.

Presentation given at the JISC Geo Programme Meeting in London on Tuesday 29th November 2011.

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Mapping the Republic of Letters - Nicole Coleman, Stanford University Mapping the Republic of Letters - Nicole Coleman, Stanford University Presentation Transcript

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  • vimeo.com/athanasius/inquiry Visual Browser
  • The Correspondence of Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680)
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  • Jesuits Other
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  • British Travelers to Italy, 1700-1800
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  • Richard Colt Hoare’s Travels in Sicily
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  • ALEXANDER, COSMO (1724-72), painter, s.and pupil? of John Alexander; emigrated to America 1766; Edinburgh c.1771. 1747-52 [dep.London summer 1746] Rome (byEaster 1747-Jun. 1751), Leghorn (1751), Bologna,Venice (by 15 Feb. 1752) [Paris 1752, London 1754] Named Cosmo after Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany, Alexander left Scotland after taking part in the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. He went first to London and then to Rome, where he had arrived by Easter 1747 when he was liv-ing in the Strada Felice with two other Scots,the elderly Jesuit priest Patrick Leith andGeorge Gray, a Scot of his own age.1 In July1747 he delivered a letter of recommendation as 'a lad of genius in painting' from Patrick Dawson to his cousin, James Edgar, secretary to the exiled Stuart court.2 That same year he was commissioned by the Pretender to paint the portrait of his son, Charles Edward Stuart(who was not then in Rome, and it is likely that Alexander made a version of an original portrait by Domenico Dupra). Further commissions came from the Pretender's family, the dates on the completed works (priv. colls.)covering his time in Rome and his subsequent stay in Paris. Alexander also met the painterGeorge Chalmers, his future brother-in-law,and painted other exiled Jacobites, including the Earl of Winton in 1749. In February 1750 Isabella Lumisden wrote from Edinburgh to her brother Andrew, under-secretary to thePretender in Rome, sending her compliments to 'Alexander'.3 Alexander received commissions from other Scots: for Alexander Hay he copied Caravaggio's Woman teaching a girl to sew, and for Peter Coutts the Dying Gladiator (in grisaille) and Carracci's Susanna. In 1751James Edgar helped him obtain a commission from the 9th Earl Marischal, to purchase prints and drawings and to complete a paint-ing of The Battle of Bannockburn, originally ordered from Placido Costanzi. A Charity(sold Christie's, 22 Sep. 1975) was acquired by Lord Deskford. Alexander left Rome in 1751,making long visits to Leghorn, where he painted
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  • Correspondents Family & Other
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  • Correspondents Family & Other
  • The Correspondence of Voltaire (1694-1778)
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  • Gray bars indicate letters in the correspondence not plotted on the map.
  • Letters Written by Voltaire
  • 7691 Source locations plotted 7404 Source locations unknown Source Locations for Letters Written by Voltaire
  • 2137 Source locations plotted 1017 Source locations unknown Source Locations for Letters Written to Voltaire
  • Letters Written to Voltaire
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  • The Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin (1694-1778)
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  • Benjamin Franklin’s French Correspondents
  • Benjamin Franklin’s French Correspondents Voltaire Benjamin Franklin
  • Benjamin Franklin’s French Correspondents André Morellet Voltaire Octavie Durey de Mesnières Anne Robert Jacques Turgot Madame Helvetius Benjamin Franklin
  • Octavie Durey de Mesnières ’s Correspondents Voltaire Octavie Durey de Mesnières Madame Helvetius Benjamin Franklin François Antoine Devaux David Hume William Strahan
  • André Morellet ’s Correspondents Voltaire André Morellet JJ Rousseau Benjamin Franklin François Antoine Devaux David Hume William Strahan Jeremy Bentham Adam Smith Madame Helvetius Claude Helvetius
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