Emerging themes on developing digital literacies
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Emerging themes on developing digital literacies

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A webinar focused on the emergent outcomes of two projects in the Jisc Developing Digital Literacies programme. Hosted by Jisc RSC Scotland

A webinar focused on the emergent outcomes of two projects in the Jisc Developing Digital Literacies programme. Hosted by Jisc RSC Scotland

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  • Mark Kerrigan, University if Greemwich from responses from 79 staff and 223 students, “These graphical representations of both staff and students indicate an interesting perception of whatdigital literacies are. There was a strong indicator of ‘ability’ and ‘understanding’ with commentsaround ‘learning’ and ‘knowledge’ A lot of the responses refer to being able to use a technology, i.e.buttons to press and thus combined indicate areas of work for the project i.e. to develop and culture abetter intuitional understanding of DL.”
  • In contrast with both the situated learning of themes 1 and 2 and the student-centred development of theme 3, many projects uncovered evidence that the adoption of technologies and the acquisition of basic digital skills was self-directed. Universities in particular are beginning to work on the assumption, sometimes implicit, that as students bring their own devices and services into the study context they are also bringing their own skills. Across almost all the student and staff groups surveyed by the professional associations, self-directed and informal learning were the mode for adopting new practices, though the presence of more expert others in close proximity (especially the same office) was important.
  • 1The PADDLE project involves 5 College partners in North Wales2) The baseline audits have shown that learners are increasingly relying and using their own technologies and tools and often would prefer to use their own technologies and tools that those provided by the Colleges3) Raises issues of access to WIFI for example. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware.4) Raises issues about the extent to which staff are permitting students to use their own technologies in formal learning situations. Also raises issues regarding use of BYO technologies for assessment purposes.5) For the technology “have not” students, Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. Learners are therefore sometimes ‘bypassing’ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced. This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware. Tutors are allowing the use of the learner’s own technology (for assessment) where it is possible to capture and store the use of such technologies (in line with traditional assessment methods). This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology ‘have nots’. Again Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Senior managers are likely to have been working in FE or HE for a long time and to have entered the profession when digital technology was not widely used or strategically important. So while most projects are taking bottom-up approaches to cultural change, developing the people at the top is also an important theme.Questions for this theme:Do we have examples of senior managers taking a strategic approach to digital capability, across institutional boundaries?
  • Do we expect our senior managers to have a vast array of technology skills at their finger tips? Often as people move into Senior Management roles, their knowledge and practical skills of different tools stagnate. (The work they do does not require them to use a vast array of skills)That’s not to say that they don’t need to keep up-to-date with developments. Without a good knowledge of what is out there, how can SM’s see and assess the potential of technology in future strategies and organisational development? How can they write meaningful strategies without an ability to assess and determine the value of technologies in future developmentsWhat should they do to be more digitally aware?Advisors in their InstitutionsActive participation outside the Institution – JISC/ RSC provide opportunities for thisLead by example in the use of technologies to enhance every day practice and working – SKYPE. Webinars, Actively promote changes through strategies and engagement with staff
  • Within HE/FE there seems to be evidence of technology use being differentiated by professional role (e.g. research, administration etc). Professional associations involved in DDL and some projects working with them are looking at changes to / mappings of / lenses on professional standards as a way of embedding digital capability. But in general terms, students are looking to develop professional practices and demonstrate their employability through their learning experience. In some cases professional bodies and/or employers are driving the curriculum to include more digital experiences, though there are also examples where professional bodies are rather conservative in this respect.
  • ColegLlandrillo, as part of the PADDLE project, has identified a range of digital skillsand attributes needed by teaching staff to carry out their roles effectively. These havebeen mapped both the the LLUK (LSIS) Teaching Standards and the HEA Learningand Teaching Standards.Staff can feel intimidated by what they perceive as the digital expertise of their students: onthe other hand, checklists of this kind emphasise the professionalism of teaching over theuse of specific devices.
  • 1) Worcester College of Technology is developing a number of accredited digital literacy accredited units for staff ( including teaching staff, ICT, staff, personal tutors and library/learning resources staff) The units are accredited by the Open College network (OCN). The first Unit to be approved is in “structuring the virtual learning environment”2) To help them better understand what we mean by digital literacy, Worcester College of Technology has conducted a literature review of the use of the expression to try and better understand the breadth and interpretation of the term. The paper makes no attempt to synthesis or draw comparisons, but simply sets out in a chronological order the way in which digital literacy has been used
  • Particularly in FE settings, there is a sense that individual learners need opportunities to be personally assessed and to receive personal support for their development. Ideally this should be reflective/integrative, should be oriented on key transitions, and should link study skills with issues of digital access and related capabilities (e.g. information skills). People who are providing this joined-up support include personal tutors and subject-specialist study hubs (e.g. based in libraries). There is perhaps a contrast with HE where digital capability is widely regarded as something that should be integrated into the curriculum and not separately addressed. However, many projects are developing diagnostic and/or reflective tools that could be free-standing from curriculum contexts.
  • Both of the FE College projects in the programme have conducted initial audits of student skills. A key finding from both is that whilst teachers often make assumptions about the level of digital literacy skills students have ( particullarly younger ones), perception does not match the realityWorcester College of Technology is developing a number of accredited digital literacy accredited units for students ( including FE and HE students). Currently 3 have been approved. The units are accredited by the Open College network:Online information SkillsOnline Professional PresenceTraditional Library skills
  • – at one university only 20% of academic staff felt that students were digitally proficient compared with 45% of students themselvesAll the FE colleges involved in the programme are working to make this a reality for their students. HE institutions, where the focus is more on curriculum change, will need to learn from this experience.
  • Many projects are engaging students as digital pioneers and as partners in the development process – in roles ranging from co-researchers to mentors to technical support. The advantages are that students are generally more digitally confident and fluent than staff. They can benefit from the experience of sharing their expertise with others. It can be challenging for staff to recognise that students have expertise beyond their own in some areas, and to see this as a resource rather than a threat.
  • Worcester College’s Baseline study explored staff perceptions that students application of digital literacies were not as good as they perceived them to be. Key findings to date: Comparative study with ( A-Level ( highers) Students and FE Students Students are of the same age group but are using technologies in different ways Most worrying is the shallow depth of searching, the use of copy and paste and the inability when using to Google to source the correct or most suitable answer. TThere is a distinct difference in the results between those who used more depth of searching and those who copied and pasted. However the amount of shallow search techniques was rather alarming. 

Emerging themes on developing digital literacies Emerging themes on developing digital literacies Presentation Transcript

  • Project Video Updates While we are waiting to start please have a look at the Institutional videos from the Developing Digital Literacies projects visit http://bit.ly/jiscdlprogvideos to hear about how they are implementing digital literacies at a strategic levelIn particular updates from two FE Colleges Coleg Llandrillo –  Worcester College of TechnologyPADDLE Project http://bit.ly/LN2hIo WORDLE Project http://bit.ly/LKOhe8
  • #jiscdiglitEmerging Themes onDeveloping Digital LiteraciesAndrew Comrie (Digital Literacies CriticalFriend) and Paul Bailey, JISC ProgrammeManager
  • What does the term “Digital Literacy” mean to you? Student Academic StaffFrom Mark Kerrigan, University of Greenwich, Baseline Survey 2012
  • A definition of digital literacy? We‟re working with colleges and universities to embed core digital skills into the curriculum. By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements.
  • Developing Digital Literacies ProgrammeA sector-wide programmepromoting the developmentof coherent, inclusive andholistic institutionalstrategies andorganisational approachesfor developing digitalliteracies for staff andstudents in UK further andhigher education.
  • Baseline Review Summary of the projects http://bit.ly/JiUV0m and professional association baseline reports http://bit.ly/KWFJUo Looked at – Policy and strategy – Support and professional services – Practices – Developing capability – Cultures and attitudes
  • BYO TechnologiesHow many personal technologies (i.e. Smart phone, laptop, ipad, etc) do you take to work?A. NoneB. OneC. TwoD. ThreeE. Four or more
  • BYO Technologies– Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. (PADDLE http://jiscpaddleproject.wordpress.com/ )– Learners are sometimes „bypassing‟ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced.– This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks.– This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology „have nots‟.
  • BYO TechnologiesBring your own technologies/use of social media “Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment” “Tutors have mixed opinions as regards using external social media against social media designed specifically for educational use”Paddle Project, Coleg Llandrillo
  • BYO Technologies BYOD/BYOS  Specialised system/application Mobile device and apps  Based around and integrated into a complex practice Web browser and services  e.g. VLE, SRS, CAD/CAM, Profile and preferences SPSS, nVivo, design Ease of adoption/use environments, Endnote... Generic, reconfigurable  Specialised, non-reconfigurable Shared, open, social  Steep learning curve Personal/social identity  Professional/academic identity Build your own Underlying data, information, standards
  • Digitally literate senior managersDo you have any examples of senior managers taking a strategic approach to using technology (digital literacies)?Type you examples in the chat box
  • Digitally literate senior managers What does a digitally literate senior manager need to know? – Often SMs are limited in their use of technologies in their own jobs. (e.g. email, MS WORD, Excel, Powerpoint) – Less about skills and more about „know-how‟ to write strategy and policy and provide leadership and direction. – Less about skills development and more about keeping up-to-date with developments, looking outside the College, participating with organisations such as JISC/ RSC
  • Developing staff digital literaciesHow would you rate your digital literacies?A. One of the most digitally literate in the collegeB. Better than my studentsC. I can only do what I need to doD. I don‟t use technologyE. Other (type in chat)
  • Developing staff digital literacies Paddle checklist  I manage my online identity and reputation  I am aware of e-safety issues  I express myself creatively, professionally or academically in a range of media  I review the appropriateness of different technologies and make informed choices about their use in the curriculum  I have input to the design of the curriculum, including choice of technologies  I participate in digital networks focused on pedagogy/teaching technique  I am aware of digital rights and responsibilities  I participate in digital networks focused on my subject area
  • Developing staff digital literacies Examples in Colleges – Developing Accredited Professional Development Units for different types of Staff ( Library/ILT/Personal Tutors/Teachers) offered as part of Staff CPD) e.g. Worcester College of technology has 1 unit approved. WORDLE Baseline report http://bit.ly/LD0SVQ – Understanding the digital literacy landscape - literature review to understand the breadth of interpretation over the term and the various associated categorisations of digital literacy http://bradyx.pbworks.com/w/file/50109770/WORDLE_DigiLit_Paper_ 1.docx Worcester College of Technology (http://prezi.com/y2utpy6sffk6/digital-literacy/
  • Developing student digital literaciesWho is responsible for developing students digital literacies in your collegeA. Does not exist in my collegeB. The library and IT servicesC. It is embedded into the curriculumD. Other (please type into chat box)
  • Developing Student Digital Literacies– Student perception of their digital literacy skills and abilities are not necessarily matched with the reality. (WORDLE and PADDLE)– Developing accredited digital literacy Units for students ( FE and HE students ) that can be embedded into course structures or offered in a supported environment such as library resource centre/study centre Worcester College of Technology (http://bradyx.pbworks.com/w/page/52526661/Appro ved%20OCN%20Units
  • Developing student digital literacies “students over-estimate their own digital capabilities” In FE, it was identified that students need the following support if they are to flourish: – diagnosis of ICT skills on entry to their course – support and progression throughout their course, in all of ICT skills, information skills, – media skills and general study skills – digital experiences integrated into curriculum activities and assessments
  • Students as partners and pioneersAre your students involved in any of theseA. Mentoring/supporting staff to develop digital literacy skillsB. Having a say in how digital literacy skills are developed on their coursesC. Engaged in developing resources (learning materials, apps, etc.)D. None of thesePlease type letters that apply in the chat and give examples
  • Students as partners and pioneers Coleg Llandrillo peer eGuides http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/el earning/swaniltig/pedl.aspx Oxford Brookes University e-Pioneers (students working with staff) Students as trainers, resource creators, researchers, entrepreneurs, mentors Supporting staff to develop digital literacies Accredited Institute of Leadership and Management (motivator).
  • Subject vs. personal digital literaciesQuestion: Are subject specific digital literaciesmore important than generic digital literacies inyour college?Answer: yes (tick) or no (cross)or type answer in chat box...
  • Subject vs. personal digital literaciesExamples from projects– The need to look closely at how students are using and applying information technology in their studies– Worcester College‟s baseline WORDLE Baseline report http://bit.ly/LD0SVQ
  • Subject vs. personal digital literacies
  • Subject vs. personal digital literaciesFrom Hague, C. & Payton, S.(2010) Digital Literacy Across theCurriculum. Bristol:Futurelab http://futurelab.org.uk/resources/digital-literacy-across-curriculum-handbook
  • #jiscdiglitDeveloping Digital LiteraciesKeeping Informed Getting Involved
  • Developing Digital Literacies - http://bit.ly/ddl-prog JISC on Air online radio programmes – Part 1 - Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities – Part 2 - Developing digital literacies for working in a digital world – Available from: www.jisc.ac.uk/jisconair Developing Digital Literacies webinar series 2012-13 Summary of the projects baseline reports. Available online: http://bit.ly/JiUV0m Summary of the professional association baseline reports. Available online: http://bit.ly/KWFJUo Institutional videos from the Developing Digital Literacies projects visit http://bit.ly/jiscdlprogvideos to hear about how they are implementing digital literacies at a strategic level
  • Developing Digital Literacies briefing paper Developing Digital Literacies Briefing paper available in June 2012, from http://bit.ly/ddl-prog and available to order from publications@jisc.ac.uk Provides a summary of the context and . emerging outcomes of the programme together with links to relevant resources. Author Sarah Payton, Freelance Education Researcher and Facilitator“Digital literacy is the intersection betweendigital knowhow and academic practice. Or, ifyou want to frame it differently, the ability tolearn, the ability to learn well.”Helen Beetham, Synthesis consultant 12/06/2012 | Slide 27
  • Further information and resources Programme blog - http://elearningprogs.jiscinvolve.org Digital Literacies Webinars - http://bit.ly/HKbYoy Join JISC-DIGLIT-PUBLIC@jiscmail.ac.uk Follow #jiscdiglit Come and speak to us – the programme will be represented at the Blended Learning Conference, HE Academy Conference, Greenwich e-Learning Conference, ALT-C with proposals submitted to SEDA Annual conference ( to add)
  • Innovating e-Learning 2012The 7th JISC international onlineconference takes place on 13th – 23rdNovember 2012Registration details announced shortly!#jiscel12www.jisc.ac.uk/elpconference12Digital literacies will be a key theme of theconference and opportunities to share yourwork in the conference activity weekI just want to say #jiscel11 was awesome...