Current issues and approaches in developing digital literacy

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Slides for webinar 12 Feb 2013. This webinar discussed what digital literacies are and why it is important for universities and colleges to develop the digital literacies of their students and staff. We will look at some of the issues to consider when planning an institutional approach to developing digital literacies, and projects from Jisc’s Developing Digital Literacies programme will highlight some of the approaches that they have found effective in their own contexts.

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  • This morning we have created some ideal digital learners, with the skills and practices necessary for them to study in college or university, and go into the workplace (and life) with a set of attributes which enable them to be confident, advanced users of technology. How close are our learners to this ‘ideal’ digitally literate graduate? How far have they got to travel? What aspects of their development do we as their educators need to focus on? Well, we know some of this already – from learner experience research funded by JISC and others… But, there is likely to still be some things you don’t know, perhaps because your particular learners are different, or because learners are changing so fast that the research is quickly becoming out of date. So this next section of the workshop is about these two things…
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways. In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction. Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways. In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction. Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways. In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction. Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways. In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction. Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways. In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction. Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • Current issues and approaches in developing digital literacy

    1. 1. Current issues and approaches in developingdigital literaciesHelen Beetham, Developing Digital Literacies programme consultantwith representatives of the SEEDPoD project (Plymouth University), Digitally Ready proje(University of Reading), DIAL project (University of the Arts, London) and Digital Literaciein Transition project (University of Greenwich)
    2. 2. Developing Digital Literacies ProgrammeA sector-wide programmepromoting the development ofcoherent, inclusive and holisticinstitutional strategies andorganisational approachesfor developing digitalliteracies for staff andstudents in UK further andhigher education.
    3. 3. Developing Digital Literacies Projects University of Greenwich  University of Bath University of the Arts London  University College London University of Exeter  Oxford Brookes University Grŵp Llandrillo Menai  Cardiff University University of Plymouth  Worcester College of Technology University of Reading  Institute of Education, London
    4. 4. What do we mean by digital literacies? The capabilities, aptitudes and attitudes learners need to thrive in a digital economy and society (JISC)For example (from various institutional strategies):[Ensure] students are prepared for study and employmentin the digital age, with a range of learning literaciesembedded into the curriculum.Consider the potential of technology to promote knowledgebuilding and reflective, student-centred, creative andcollaborative learning.[develop] self-regulating citizens in a globally connectedsociety, able to handle multiple, diverse informationsources and media.
    5. 5. JISC/SCONUL ICT/Computer Literacy the ability to adopt, adapt and use digital devices, applications and services in pursuit of scholarly and educational goals. Information Literacy: the ability to find, interpret, evaluate, manage and share information, especially scholarly and educational information Media Literacy: the ability to critically read and creatively produce academic and professional communications in a range of media. Communication and Collaboration: the ability to participate in digital networks and working groups of research and learning Digital scholarship: the ability to participate in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems Learning Skills: the ability to study and learn effectively in technology- rich environments, formal and informal
    6. 6. Alternative modelsGreenwich Five Resources model
    7. 7. How are you involved in digital literacy? A) Supporting student learning in the curriculum B) Supporting student learning alongside the curriculum e.g. library, careers, learning skills C) Developing professional practices of staff D) Building C21st learning environment E) Developing institutional strategyChoose the one most relevant to your responsibilities andinterests. Give more details in the chat box.
    8. 8. What experiences do learners need to develop DLs?extensive, complex, ill-defined attributes and non-formal learning identities co-curriculum curriculum situated practices functional skills access and awarenessintensive, simplified, well-defined
    9. 9. Developing institutions to develop peopleFeatures audited at baseline:  institutional infrastructure and learning environment  relevant strategies and policies  Academic/learning cultures and attitudes  roles/responsibilities of professional services  practices in the curriculum  the learning experience
    10. 10. What is being done? Professional development for teaching staff Partnerships with professional staff Mini-projects / case studies in departments Develop DL materials with/for students Students as pioneers/researchers/agents of change Change management approachesDevelop learning environment and ICT policies (BYOD) Institutional restructuring and major policy initiatives Qualitative and quantitative research
    11. 11. Four different institutional approaches1. Plymouth University (SEEDPoD): restructuring professional services2. University of Reading (Digitally Ready): readiness across the board3. University of the Arts, London (DIAL): transforming subject areas4. University of Greenwich (DL in transition): engaging staff and students
    12. 12. Embedding Digital Literacy Prof Neil Witt Dr Anne McDermott Rob Stillwellwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 12
    13. 13. What Is SEEDPoD?• Builds on 2011 BCUP project• Audit of systems, policies, infrastructure and data• Views from academic and support staff on use of, and practice with, existing software and hardware systems.• Recommending Institutional change on DL issues around: • Infrastructure • Support • Curriculum Designwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 13
    14. 14. The Digital StrategyOpportunity 1 – inputting into Strategy•Key theme 1 - Digital People•Key theme 2 - Digital teaching, learning and research•Key theme 3 - Digital services•Key theme 4 - Digital Infrastructure and Capabilitywww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 14
    15. 15. Performance Development ReviewOpportunity 2 – using new processes Embed in PDR Embed in PDRwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 15
    16. 16. Embracing ChangeOpportunity 3 – use Restructuring An opportunity to recommend Institutional change: • Infrastructure • Supportwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 16
    17. 17. Being part of the solution• Technology and Information Services – Strategy & Architecture – Solution Development – Service Management – Library and Digital Services – Academic Support, Technology & Innovation• the annoying academic on the shoulder of the CIOwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 17
    18. 18. Being part of the solution • Strong focus around Digital Literacy • Faculty support via LTs in the Faculties • Part of TIS, so embedding and sustainability of• Subject Librarians, IT Trainers innovation easier and Learning Technologists working in 3 teams • Single point of entry for training & teaching and Digital Skills Development learning resources Engagement and Support • Focus on community TEL & Assessment developmentwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 18
    19. 19. Joining it all up Embed in the curriculum Embed in the curriculumwww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 19
    20. 20. A caveat• "This range of approaches has also had a significant impact on the kind of evidence presented at the end of the projects with research-based projects offering some compelling evidence, but with impact on much smaller numbers of students, whilst impact on the whole institution is harder to measure and present as evidence, but has much more significance in terms of sustainability and embedding. Funders should continue to value this „softer‟ evidence. " Lou McGill Curriculum Delivery Programme Synthesiswww.technologyenhancedlearning.net 20
    21. 21. Any Questions?www.technologyenhancedlearning.net 21
    22. 22. Digitally ReadyReadinessacross theboardNadja Guggi, Digitally Ready Project OfficerFebruary 13, 2013 © University of Reading 2008 www.reading.ac.uk
    23. 23. Organisational challenges & issues• No formal ‘digital’ University strategies, policies or plans• Risk-averse, collegiate in structure and culture• Silos – Pockets of good practice – Dependence on individual initiative – Lack of co-ordination between key professional services• Varying levels of digital literacies• Little knowledge of student expectations, attitudes and use of technology• Little knowledge of employer expectations• Major organisational changeReadiness across the board 23
    24. 24. Digitally Ready: bottom up• Digital community-building & upskilling – Digital Heroes – Micro funding to support local initiatives – Work with existing structures: professional services, communities of practice, projects – Regular formal and informal events and training opportunities – Blog, newsletter, Yammer• Research – Digital literacies for student employability – Student technology attitudes and useReadiness across the board 24
    25. 25. Digitally Ready: top down• Senior management engagement – Steering Group: heads of key professional services plus chaired by senior manager – University committee structure – Vice-Chancellor and Pro-Vice-Chancellor as champions for change (e.g. video, events)Readiness across the board 25
    26. 26. Key gains & changes• Genuine commitment from senior management to developing digital literacies at institutional level – Learning & Teaching Strategy 2013–18 – TEL Strategy Group chaired by Pro-Vice-Chancelor (digital literacies/TEL; infrastructure provision; digital communication & marketing; digital governance; staff & student development) – Futurelearn membership• Body of evidence to inform strategic decisions• Better able to anticipate and meet student and employer expectations• Emerging digital communityReadiness across the board 26
    27. 27. The DIAL ProjectAims: Cultural Change and Improved graduateemployability.Approach: Support a number of self-identifyingand mutually supportive communities of staff andstudents within the university (based on courses,disciplines or other naturally occurringcommunities) who identify goals for improvingtheir collective digital literacies.Project blog: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/Project resources: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-projects-and-activities
    28. 28. Embedding Digital Literacies at UAL?• Are we a project or a programme? Too big to be a project. A sustainable DL programme. Senior management support UAL Digital life programme and DL programme. Complicated landscape• Managing expectations, demand, scope and capacity. DIAL will do everything DL. Difficult to demonstrate benefits. Difficult to deliver tangible outputs Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies• Meeting expectations, demand, scope and capacity. Expressions of interest with DIY built in evaluation Extra funding Two new DIAL coordinators (0.5) Visualise and present projects and activities Reduce DIAL brand Improve web environments, outgrown the project blog
    29. 29. Digital Literacies: integration with curriculum and services.• Project Groups; most groups are autonomous.• Collaborating with UAL services and departments.• Academic and curriculum integration• Project Groups supporting Academic and curriculum integration.• Natural cross sector collaboration/common interests (GSA)• Other general observations• Project deliverables: Stories Online resources - OERs Case studies New communities of practice; face to face and virtual Workshops and training courses Commissioned and in-house research Sector collaboration
    30. 30. EMPLOYMENT SECTOR Challenges • How do we deliver a large- scale institutional change project? • How can we fosterHIGHER EDUCATION accelerated buy-in? • How can we ensure currency?INSTITUTION • How can we develop sustainability?FACULTY University of Greenwich – http://www.DLinHE.com
    31. 31. Student change agents • Developed a cross- university process for recruiting digitally-aligned change agents • Promoted the use of e- editors within schools • Student-developed workshop series • Student-created resourcesUniversity of Greenwich – http://www.DLinHE.com
    32. 32. Gains • Students recognised as valued contributors of change • Discussions taking place that would not otherwise happen • Excellent access to the student cohort and thus: ‘on pulse’ • New ways to meet institutional KPIsUniversity of Greenwich – http://www.DLinHE.com
    33. 33. What will we offer? Self-assessment/self-development materials Briefings and OERs e.g. on social media, digital identity, digital research Support for curriculum design and examples of digital literacy development in different subject areas Organisational case studies and lessons learned Role descriptions and work with professional standards/ benchmarks e.g. UK PSF, CMALT, SCONUL Conceptual frameworks Institutional audit materials and checklist for planning/ evaluating digital literacy initiatives bit.ly/JISCDDL

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