• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Controversy with embryonic stem cell research
 

Controversy with embryonic stem cell research

on

  • 483 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
483
Views on SlideShare
483
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Controversy with embryonic stem cell research Controversy with embryonic stem cell research Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • INTRO TO A CELL
      • A CELL IS THE BASIC UNIT OF LIFE.
      • ONE TYPE OF CELL IS A STEM CELL
      • THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF STEM CELLS.
      • EMBRYONIC STEM CELL-THIS TYPE OF CELL CAN BECOME ANY TYPE OF TISSUE OR ORGAN OF THE BODY.
      • ADULT STEM CELL- THIS TYPE OF CELL IS LIMITED TO WHAT IT CAN BECOME (SCOTT, 2006)
      “ monster” cell- triple labeled by Trazy on flickr
    • Why do scientist want to advance in their research?
      • They think that by using embryonic stem cells, they can have benefits in medical therapy.
      • Embryonic stem cells can adapt to their environment, they can renew themselves
      • Stem cells can have special functions (ex. Heart beat muscle)
      Mouse embryonic stem cell by California Institute for Regenerative Medicine on flickr
    • Where does politics stand?
      • Former President George Bush, allowed funding for embryonic stem cell research only when the embryo is harvested, not frozen and still living.
      • He considered himself to be pro-life which made others, like Congresswoman, Nancy Pelosi, made him rethink his opinion on the topic.
      • Bush has even vetoed policies that will try to override his decision (Lefkowitz, 2008).
      • Prior to Bush, there was an amendment called the Dickey Amendment, which did fund research involving “human embryos or embryos being destroyed” (Lefkowitz, 2008).
      • Former President Clinton had his lawyers revise this however.
      • Final decision by Pres. Bush, allow public funding, only on embryo lines already created.
      The perfect drug by limowreck on flickr
    • Religion point of view (Roman Catholic Church)
      • They believe life begins at conception
      • Tampering with embryos is tampering with Gods creation
      • Their view point “ they [embryonic stem cells ] are purposely created to be destroyed” ( Sanders, 136)
      Clip Art
    • Religion cont…(Islamic and Muslim)
      • In regards to science they have what is called the ijtihadwhich states what can, and cannot be done.
      • Research that will benefit humankind and does not question the works of Allah is permissible
      • They can embrace knowledge but remember that God is merciful and no advancement is possible without Him.
      Old Bible by BogdonBarlea On Flickr
    • My opinion on the matter
      • Public funding is great for embryonic stem cell research.
      • However, the issue is still so complex that it can’t just be seen as an advancement in science.
      • Embryos are being “killed” but they are still being put to great use.
      • Controversy isn’t whether religion or politics is right, but moral and ethic point of views.
      • Al-Hayani, F. (2008). Biomedical ethics. Zygon. 42, 153-165. Retrieved February 17, 2009.
      • Pressberg, G., & Solo, P. (2007). The promise and politics of stem cell research. Westport, CT:PraegerPublishers.
      • Sanders, W. (2006). Embryonic stem cell research destroys human lives. In Wilson, M. (Ed.), World Religion (pp. 134-138). Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale.
      • Scott, C. (2006). Stem cell now: From the experiment that shook the world to the newpolitics of life . New York, NY: PI Press.
      • Leftkowirz, J. (2008) Stem cells and the president: “An inside account.” Commentary, 125, 19-24.