Facebook and Beyond

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A talk, first given at The Royal College of Psychiatrists' International Congress 2013 in Edinburgh, about the use of social media in a professional capacity. It discusses benefits and pitfalls and some of the ways in which the most common sites can be used. It introduces some less well-known sites, touches on doctors' concerns about using SoMe, responsible use and finally, possible future directions of social media in psychiatry and medicine as a whole.

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  • Chris has already mentioned the statistics with regards to users of the most common sites. It’s astounding just how many people are online and using the internet to communicate. Patients have previously used the internet to look for information, and clinicians rose to the challenge of providing accurate, simple, information in the face of inaccurate, misleading information. Now patients are turning to social media to ask questions, and shouldn’t we be the ones to step up and ensure those questions are being answered by people qualified to do so? i.e. Us doctorsSocial media can be a powerful tool for communicating with colleagues. Professional Facebook pages, Twitter accounts, and blogs enable physicians to easily share useful links to articles and videos. Physicians with common interests can disseminate information by creating online learning networks.[9] Similarly, social media tools have the potential to enhance medical education. For example, Twitter accounts may augment medical trainee education through announcements, exam preparation, and locating CME resources.[9] Physicians are using Twitter to post questions with links to blogs for active discussion.9 Physicians who passively follow Twitter accounts will still gain access to these additional educational resources.
  • Similarly, social media tools have the potential to enhance medical education. For example, Twitter accounts may augment medical trainee education through announcements, exam preparation, both from senior clinicians and peers. Physicians are using Twitter to post questions with links to blogs for active discussion.9 Physicians who passively follow Twitter accounts will still gain access to these additional educational resources. I’m not going to spend much time on this as Stephen is talking about using social media for CPD in a lot more detail. Re Health promotion: There are so many ways! From promoting smoking cessation or first aid, to more targeted measures such as using Twitter or Facebook to make a vulnerable group more aware, e.g. STIs. Promotion of service, compliance with medicationUp-to-the minute e.g. Epidemic/disease spread. Disaster management
  • In Leeds, for example, we have a facebook group for the JDC. This is closed so that junior doctors working in psychiatry can share messages privately.
  • As you can see, the interface is far less cluttered (sic).
  • It’s a useful way of collating titbits of information, and sharing them. Users can repin your posts, which then garners more followers.
  • Chris has already gone over the guidelines from GMC but ...
  • Appointment reminders via text are increasingly common; prescription apps and monitoring e.g. Blood sugars, BP. An example of Twitter bringing together doctors and other healthcare professionals is the use of the platform for journal clubs, where a paper is discussed. The brevity of using 140 characters is very helpful in summarising key points. #medartschat- discussing a cultural topic relevant to medicine. Recent example was discussing dementia in context of the Judi Dench movie Iris about the novelist Iris Murdoch who suffered from Alzheimers’ Several online medical communities already exist- often disease-specific and led by patients or carers, but increasingly doctors are becoming involved, which provides us with a way of interacting even more with our patients and ensuring that patients are fully, and correctly, informed. Social media is new to a lot of practising doctors, but for students entering medical school, it’s part of everyday life. Therefore it’s probably not surprising that students are in some ways at the forefront of social media use. Encouraging them to use social media responsibly, to become aware of and talk about topical issues, to support each others’ learning, to network and to research their future careers will only benefit the profession as a whole.
  • Social media is new to a lot of practising doctors, but for students entering medical school, it’s part of everyday life. Therefore it’s probably not surprising that students are in some ways at the forefront of social media use. Encouraging them to use social media responsibly, to become aware of and talk about topical issues, to support each others’ learning, to network and to research their future careers will only benefit the profession as a whole.
  • Facebook and Beyond

    1. 1. Facebook and Beyond: Professional Use of Social Media By Dr Jini Mulukutla @lwpsyjdc @jini0181 Rajini.mulukutla@nhs.net
    2. 2. This talk will look at ... • Some of the social media sites available – Facebook – Twitter – Pinterest and LinkedIn • The benefits of using these in professional life • A personal experience of using social networking • Some of the practical aspects of using social networking • Social media in the future
    3. 3. Why is social media important? • Accessibility – The vast majority of patients are online • Patients are using it, the ‘e-patient’ – Word of mouth, but on a far bigger scale – Discussions about conditions, services, doctors • Peer-to-peer communication – Sharing common interests – Geography no barrier
    4. 4. Why is social media important? • Health promotion • Medical education • Up-to-the-minute information • Positive online presence • *140 Healthcare uses for Twitter* • http://philbaumann.com/140-health-care- uses-for-twitter/
    5. 5. Facebook • Founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg • Probably most well known • Most commonly used by doctors • Tends to be used as a way to interact with a known social circle • People make ‘friends’ and ‘like’ comments, links or pages • Can form groups and create pages to promote topics/causes/services
    6. 6. Twitter • Described a ‘microblogging’ site • Interface is much simpler than Facebook • Posts are less than 140 characters = short snippets of information, little and often • Topics are introduced by ‘#’ e.g. #socialmedia #RCPsychIC13 • People ‘follow’ each other • Much easier to interact with people you don’t know in real life • Very accessible- easy to find and follow people with similar interests • Way to interact with big organisations and promote activities
    7. 7. Pinterest • A newer site- used to be invitation only, but now open access • Like a virtual pinboard • Allows users to post information such as interesting sites, pictures & video • Allows users to collect and store information of interest to them • Follow people with similar interests • Information can be grouped into categories called ‘boards’ • Easy to link with Facebook or Twitter account
    8. 8. Storify • Curates and collates social media snippets into stories and timelines • Allows users to search others’ stories on relevant topics • Links in with the most popular social media sites so information can be collected and shared easily
    9. 9. LinkedIn • Share your professional profile • Easy way of putting your CV out and making sure relevant people see it • Has been used in corporate world for many years • Relatively new to doctors
    10. 10. A few others • Tumblr- just bought by Yahoo – Simple blogging interface – Easy to share and follow posts • FourSquare – Location-based site designed for smartphones – Users ‘check-in’ to interact with environment • Instagram- now owned by Facebook – Photo taking, customising and sharing • YouTube – Very well known video sharing site owned by Google • Google Plus – Brings users together with Google services such as Gmail and YouTube – Share information, photos, videos, ideas with ‘Circles’ of contacts and with communities
    11. 11. Pitfalls • Time commitment – You get out what you put in • Keeping on top of things • Privacy- keeping up with changing privacy settings and ToS • Interacting with people who don’t share your POV • Can make it harder to separate professional and personal lives
    12. 12. Doctors’ concerns about social media • Patient dignity and privacy • Doctors’ privacy • Professional oaths to do no harm • Litigation worries
    13. 13. Responsible social media use • Address social media requests/invitations from patients promptly and in person • Familiarise yourself with the site’s Terms of Service and privacy settings (and use them) • Think before you post: Who can see your content? What image do you wish to portray? • Check before you accept: If you’re not sure who’s sent that follow/friend request, don’t accept until you know
    14. 14. The future of social media? • Increased use of mobile devices and applications e.g. Prescription apps • Use of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube for seminars and discussions – to educate and bring together patients – Fora for professional discussions – E.g. Twitter Journal Clubs, #medartschat • Development of online medical communities
    15. 15. The future of social media? • More medical students using social media in their burgeoning professional lives • Branch – New site where users start a topic of conversation and others join. No character restriction. Interacts with twitter. Very simple interface
    16. 16. Summary • This presentation has covered: – Reasons to use social media in professional life – Some of the most common sites out there – Demonstrated ways in which these sites can be used – Gone over some pitfalls of social media use – Discussed responsible use of social media – Looked into the future of social media for doctors
    17. 17. Thank you!
    18. 18. Social Media Explained ... Using donuts

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