Clefs and finding your part
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Clefs and finding your part

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This walks through the basic staff and the clefs that designate them. It shows how to find your part.

This walks through the basic staff and the clefs that designate them. It shows how to find your part.

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Clefs and finding your part Clefs and finding your part Presentation Transcript

  • Clefs and Finding Yours
  • The Different Clefs ● The two clefs you should know are: – The Treble or G Clef – The Bass or F Clef
  • Treble Clef ● The Treble Clef looks like a fancy G script. ● In standard notation, it sits with the circle surrounding the second line from the bottom of the staff. ● The second line of this staff is then called G (hence it's second name: G Clef)
  • Bass Clef ● The Bass Cleff looks like backwards C. ● In standard notation, it sits with the dot on the second line from the top of the staff. ● The second line from the top of this staff is then called F (hence it's second name: F Clef)
  • Grand Staff ● In order to cover all the notes (bass and treble) we can create what is called the Grand Staff. ● Note that the line added in the middle is shared by both the top and bottom staff. ● The middle note is called “Middle C”
  • Tenor Clef ● The Tenor Clef is exactly like the Treble Clef accept it has an 8 below it. ● The 8 indicates all notes are played an octave below the treble cleff ● The second line from the bottom of this staff is still called G but an octave below.
  • Parts ● In SATB Music, the parts are usually separated out with individal lines. ● Here we see that Alto's and Soprano's have a Treble Clef, Tenors have a Tenor Clef and Basses have a Bass Clef
  • Parts (continued.) ● In condensed choir staff, Soprano's and Altos are on the top line, Tenors and Basses are on the bottom. ● The stems indicate which voice sings which part: Sopranos have stems going up; Altos going down; Tenors going up; Basses going down. Soprano Alto Tenor Bass