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Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map
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Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map

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A Customer Ecosystem Map is a great way to get internal teams to understand the complexity of your current customer journey, and to rally the team to improve the journey through reducing friction …

A Customer Ecosystem Map is a great way to get internal teams to understand the complexity of your current customer journey, and to rally the team to improve the journey through reducing friction points.

A Customer Ecosystem Map is an internally-created map of the customer journey, matched with the internal teams and resources impacting that journey. It is often created in conjunction with a Customer Journey Map.

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  • 1. Creating a Customer Ecosystem Map of Your Customer Experience Presented by: Jim Tincher, Principal Consultant, Heart of the Customer
  • 2. What is a Customer Ecosystem Map? An internally-created map of the customer journey, matched with the internal teams and resources impacting that journey. It is often created in conjunction with a Customer Journey Map. Forrester wrote about them in Outside In, but the process has been around for years. They are often confused with process maps. The biggest difference is that ecosystem maps begin with the customer’s steps, as opposed to the internal processes.
  • 3. Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Quick Fixes Project Prioritization Long-Term Solutions Select a Journey
  • 4. Select a Journey Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Quick Fixes Project Prioritization Long-Term Solutions Select a journey where you see significant customer experience impact. Isolate the specific customer impacted by the journey. In the physicians’ office example that follows, Seniors experience the journey differently than do other segments of customers.
  • 5. Teams document the customer steps and the resources and processes that impact that experience. Process Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Quick Fixes Project Prioritization Long-Term Solutions Select a Journey Shared view of the customer journey and items that impact it Areas of customer impact to investigate Top areas of focus to improve your customer experience Outputs
  • 6. Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Quick Fixes Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Project Prioritization Long-Term Solutions Select a Journey The process often pinpoints short-term opportunities to improve your customer experience until long-term improvements can be made.
  • 7. Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Quick Fixes Project Prioritization Long-Term Solutions Select a Journey Research results in a Customer Journey Map. Research can come before or after the Ecosystem Map. If done before, the Research finds the customer pain, which the ecosystem map can delve into. Research conducted after the Ecosystem map can extend the existing work to uncover areas and pain points that were missed in the ecosystem mapping.
  • 8. Research-based Customer Journey Maps Customer Journey Maps extend your knowledge through a disciplined research process – learn more here.
  • 9. Typical Results of Creating Customer Journey Maps Discovery of missing touch points and friction points Reliable measurement of emotional impact broken down by customer type Additional metrics on each touch point and moment of truth Identification of Moments of Truth
  • 10. Typical Customer Experience Improvement Process Project Prioritization Create Customer Ecosystem Maps Research to Validate and Extend Knowledge Quick Fixes Select a Journey Long-Term Solutions Once the source of the customer pain is known, long-term solutions can be developed. These long-term solutions can improve the customer journey, resulting in higher loyalty, more referrals, and often a lower cost to service customers.
  • 11. How do you use the Customer Ecosystem Mapping process? As a way to gather cross-functional input As a method to determine what you don’t yet know about the problem As an exercise to create a shared understanding of the issue As a first step towards more in-depth work or research on the problem
  • 12. Customer Ecosystem Mapping process
  • 13. How do you create a Customer Ecosystem Map? Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Customer and Employee Emotional Reaction
  • 14. Select a Customer and Journey • Determine a key customer segment or type. • Select a journey that needs improvement • Use other forms of research to identify journeys needing improvement • Start with a small journey (8-12 customer steps) to learn the process • Once you have the process down, move to more complex journeys Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reaction
  • 15. Invite mapping team members • Recruit a mapping team • Include representatives of all groups who impact the process – both customer-facing and back-end • Include a mixture of management and front-line employees • Consider including customers and/or external partners on you’re more comfortable with the process • Create a process description with customer impact for members to review • Have members research the issue before the mapping session • Bring all members into a large room for the process • Needed Supplies • Big paper or mobile white board for the map • sticky notes in seven colors • Red, green and yellow sticky dots Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reaction
  • 16. Friction points People interacting with customer Systems and Objects Internal Teams Systems and Objects Actions Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Document your Customer’s steps Have members write down the series of customer steps on sticky notes • Choose a customer-facing member to go first, then ask others what steps have been missed • Do not go into exceptions or friction points yet – this is the journey as it is designed • Leave spaces between each, as you may discover missed steps later Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions Later steps are omitted here for space reasons
  • 17. Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Internal Teams Systems and Objects Actions Receptionist Scheduler Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Document People and Groups interacting with your Customer Have members write down the people and groups your customer interacts with on a differently-colored sticky note • Have a volunteer place these directly below the matching customer- focused step • Have others members add teams that the first volunteer missed Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 18. Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Phone system Internal Teams Systems and Objects Actions Receptionist Scheduler Email system Phone system Appointment System Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Document Customer-facing Objects in the journey Use a different color of sticky note and document the objects your customer interacts with at each step of the journey • Include both physical objects (such as forms) and virtual (such as websites) Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 19. Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Phone system Internal Teams Systems and Objects Actions Receptionist Scheduler Email system Phone system Appointment System Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Draw a line to separate the Backstage processes Items below this line are not seen by the customer, but can have significant impact on their experience Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 20. Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Phone system Internal Teams Systems and Objects CRM Actions Need for call generated Physician Appt created Nurse Receptionist Scheduler Email system Email Sent Phone system Appointment System CRM Appointment System CRM Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Constant Contact Document “Invisible” items impacting the journey Create sticky notes documenting the actions, people, groups and objects that support the actions above • Examples can include finance, the teams printing bills, IT systems, etc. • This will take a bit longer, as many invisible items impact the experience • Have one member give his/her perspectives, then open it up for debate Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 21. Physician not available for 2+ weeks Senior patients prefer physical mail Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Phone system Internal Teams Systems and Objects CRM Actions Need for call generated Physician Appt created Nurse Receptionist Scheduler Email system Email Sent Phone system Appointment System CRM Appointment System CRM Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Constant Contact Find the Friction Points Identify the places in the journey where things tend to go wrong • Use call center logs, surveys, customer journey maps and other research to discover these friction points • Focus on the most important areas – those impacting the most people • Including all possible friction points will bog down this process – call out only those most commonly experienced Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 22. Physician not available for 2+ weeks Senior patients prefer physical mail Friction points People interacting with customer Receptionist Systems and Objects Phone system Internal Teams Systems and Objects CRM Actions Need for call generated Physician Appt created Nurse Receptionist Scheduler Email system Email Sent Phone system Appointment System CRM Appointment System CRM Patient returns call to schedule appointment Patient receives an emailed reminder Customer Steps Patient receives reminder call for appointment Receptionist Constant Contact Estimate the Emotional Reactions For each person involved in the process, place green, yellow or red dots (positive, neutral, negative) on each part of the journey to represent whether it is working well from the perspective of the person touching it • Document customer reactions first, then the employees • Have one member place his/her thoughts on the map, then debate • If you have a customer journey map, use that to help estimate the customer reaction • Notice that employees are often perfectly happy with a process that frustrates your customers Select Journey Invite Members Document Steps People and Groups Objects Separate Backstage Supporting Actions, People, Groups, Systems & Objects Friction Points Emotional Reactions
  • 23. Recapping is one of the most critical parts of the process • What was learned? • What surprised members? Are there quick changes that can improve the experience? Are there parts of the process that we still don’t know? Are there additional teams we need to engage? Do we need more details? Follow-up meetings are common especially the first few times you go through this process
  • 24. Notes on the process Typical length = 2 hours for simple map Save time by having participants do research beforehand Longer processes can take 4-8 hours Discussion = Magic Creating a shared view is critical Iteration Happens Some questions can’t be immediately answered Avoid finger-pointing The goal is not to judge, but uncover opportunities Even broken processes exist for a reason Look for the quick fixes Often, both simple and long-term solutions come to mind Quick fixes build a sense of momentum
  • 25. Questions? Reach out to Jim • Customer Experience Consultant, Researcher, Blogger and Speaker • Heart of the Customer Blog (www.HeartoftheCustomer.com/blog) • Speaker Profile: www.speakermatch.com/profile/JimTincher/ • CXPA Member 612.747.4021 jim@heartofthecustomer.com LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jimtincher Jim Tincher

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