Implementation and Evaluation of HBSE Courses Using Collaborative Learning Groups Angie Mann-Williams, LCSW Mary Secret, P...
Presentation Goals <ul><li>Identify and explain the theoretical basis for utilizing Collaborative Learning Groups in HBSE ...
Presentation Outline <ul><li>Theoretical underpinnings of Collaborative Learning Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing Col...
Human Behavior in the Social Environment:  Online and Face-to-Face Courses <ul><li>HBSE was the most frequently offered on...
Technology and Pedagogy <ul><li>The intersection of technology and pedagogy are critically important in ensuring that the ...
Collaborative Learning Groups  <ul><li>CLG’s allow students to work together to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gather resources </...
Theoretical Foundation of CLG’s Informed by Dewey  <ul><li>Learning is achieved within a social context </li></ul><ul><li>...
CSWE Educational Policies and Competencies <ul><li>Educational Policy 2.1.1—Identify as a professional social worker and c...
Implementing CLG’s in Face-to-Face and Online Courses <ul><li>Using Blackboard, in online classes, students are placed in ...
CLG’s in Online Courses <ul><li>An example from VCU: </li></ul><ul><li>Students assigned to small discussion groups of 4 t...
CLG’s in Face-to-Face Courses  <ul><li>An example from VCU: </li></ul><ul><li>Students assigned to small discussion groups...
Sample CLG Question <ul><li>Using a case study in the Hutchison (2008) text  </li></ul><ul><li>students are asked to respo...
Benefits and Challenges of Using CLG’s <ul><li>Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes a more constructivist learning environ...
Assessment and Evaluation of CLG’s <ul><li>Online Courses: </li></ul><ul><li>Grade weekly using a rubric </li></ul><ul><ul...
Comparative Formal Evaluation of Online and Face-to-Face HBSE Courses Using CLG’s  <ul><li>Developed an evaluation tool:  ...
SLOQ Structured to Focus on Different Areas of the EPAS <ul><li>Areas: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Utilization of conceptual fra...
Data Analysis <ul><li>Mann Whitney non-parametric was used to determine differences between the online class and the face ...
Findings: Differences in Learning Outcomes in Online and Face-to-Face Courses <ul><li>Students in online class scored high...
Discussion and Questions
Accessing the Presentation Online <ul><li>http://hbseevaluationapm2010.blogspot.com </li></ul>
References <ul><li>Dewey, J. (1916) . Democracy and education:  An introduction to the philosophy of education . The MacMi...
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Implementation and Evaluation of HBSE Courses using Collaborative Learning Groups (CLG's)

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Implementation and Evaluation of HBSE Courses using Collaborative Learning Groups (CLG's)

  1. 1. Implementation and Evaluation of HBSE Courses Using Collaborative Learning Groups Angie Mann-Williams, LCSW Mary Secret, Ph.D. James Young, MSW, MPA Virginia Commonwealth University School of Social Work
  2. 2. Presentation Goals <ul><li>Identify and explain the theoretical basis for utilizing Collaborative Learning Groups in HBSE courses. </li></ul><ul><li>Outline and explain how to implement Collaborative Learning Groups in online and face-to-face HBSE courses. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate student achievement learning outcomes in face-to-face and online HBSE courses. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Presentation Outline <ul><li>Theoretical underpinnings of Collaborative Learning Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing Collaborative Learning Groups in online and face-to-face courses </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits and challenges in using Collaborative Learning Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment and evaluation of Collaborative Learning Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative Formal Evaluation of Online and Face-to-Face HBSE Courses Using CLG’s </li></ul>
  4. 4. Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Online and Face-to-Face Courses <ul><li>HBSE was the most frequently offered online course within social work curricula (Siegel, Jennings, Conklin, and Napoletano-Flynn, 1998). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Given this, it is critically important to explore strategies for faculty to use within both online and face-to-face HBSE courses. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Technology and Pedagogy <ul><li>The intersection of technology and pedagogy are critically important in ensuring that the course content is effectively delivered. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The use of Collaborative Learning Groups (CLG’s) within online courses and face-to-face courses is a mechanism to integrate technology and pedagogy. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Collaborative Learning Groups <ul><li>CLG’s allow students to work together to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gather resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem solve questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process and explore ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop and implement group projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete course assignments </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Theoretical Foundation of CLG’s Informed by Dewey <ul><li>Learning is achieved within a social context </li></ul><ul><li>Learning results from conceptual change in the mind of the learner </li></ul><ul><li>New knowledge is based on preceding knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Student is at the center of the learning experience </li></ul><ul><li>Learning occurs within authentic, real-world learning tasks </li></ul>
  8. 8. CSWE Educational Policies and Competencies <ul><li>Educational Policy 2.1.1—Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly. </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Policy 2.1.3—Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments. </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Policy 2.1.4—Engage diversity and difference in practice. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Implementing CLG’s in Face-to-Face and Online Courses <ul><li>Using Blackboard, in online classes, students are placed in CLG’s. </li></ul><ul><li>The online use of CLG’s can be mirrored within face-to-face classes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rather than using Blackboard, students engage in their CLG during structured class time. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. CLG’s in Online Courses <ul><li>An example from VCU: </li></ul><ul><li>Students assigned to small discussion groups of 4 to 5 students. </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly discussion board forums </li></ul><ul><li>Questions generated from the assigned reading for that week </li></ul><ul><li>Question posted and each forum open for one week </li></ul><ul><li>Students expected to do a minimum of two postings per week in the group. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a direct reply to the discussion board question of the week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a response/reaction/feedback to one other group member’s posting. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. CLG’s in Face-to-Face Courses <ul><li>An example from VCU: </li></ul><ul><li>Students assigned to small discussion groups of 4 to 5 students. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions are generated from the assigned reading for that week </li></ul><ul><li>The CLG questions are posted prior to class on the Blackboard site for the course and posted on the board in the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Within the structured class time, students organize in their CLG’s and respond to the posted question </li></ul><ul><li>Collectively, as a class, CLG’s share their responses, perceptions, ideas, etc. related to the posted question </li></ul>
  12. 12. Sample CLG Question <ul><li>Using a case study in the Hutchison (2008) text </li></ul><ul><li>students are asked to respond to the following </li></ul><ul><li>question: </li></ul><ul><li>Compare and contrast Stan and Tina’s experiences at Community High School with your own high school experience, considering the each of the following themes . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Material and behavioral cultural symbols </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Processes of cultural change (assimilation, accommodation, acculturation, bicultural socialization) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ways in which race, ethnicity, social class, and gender play out in the school setting </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Benefits and Challenges of Using CLG’s <ul><li>Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes a more constructivist learning environment </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes student engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes reflective and in depth discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>The time devoted to using CLG’s during structured face-to-face class time </li></ul><ul><li>Fully assessing individual participation in CLG’s in a face-to-face class </li></ul><ul><li>Amount of time spent grading online CLG responses in online courses </li></ul>
  14. 14. Assessment and Evaluation of CLG’s <ul><li>Online Courses: </li></ul><ul><li>Grade weekly using a rubric </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recommended feedback mechanism to assess effectiveness of a student’s participation in threaded discussions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A “scoring guide, laid out in the form of a table, identifies levels of performance on any given assignment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Student assessment and evaluation of themselves and their fellow group members </li></ul><ul><li>Face-to-Face Courses: </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor participation of each student in the context of their CLG </li></ul><ul><li>Assess the content and depth of the CLG responses </li></ul><ul><li>Student assessment and evaluation of themselves and their fellow group members </li></ul>
  15. 15. Comparative Formal Evaluation of Online and Face-to-Face HBSE Courses Using CLG’s <ul><li>Developed an evaluation tool: Student Learning Outcomes Questionnaire (SLOQ) to assess learning outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>The SLOQ included four case studies focusing on different life stages ranging from pregnancy to young adulthood </li></ul>
  16. 16. SLOQ Structured to Focus on Different Areas of the EPAS <ul><li>Areas: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Utilization of conceptual framework </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critique and application of evidence-based knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engagement to diversity and difference </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Data Analysis <ul><li>Mann Whitney non-parametric was used to determine differences between the online class and the face to face classes related to learning outcomes </li></ul>
  18. 18. Findings: Differences in Learning Outcomes in Online and Face-to-Face Courses <ul><li>Students in online class scored higher in conceptual knowledge (p = .003) and in overall knowledge (p = .006) </li></ul><ul><li>No stat sig difference in evidence-based knowledge (p =.095 ) or diversity knowledge (p = .202) </li></ul>
  19. 19. Discussion and Questions
  20. 20. Accessing the Presentation Online <ul><li>http://hbseevaluationapm2010.blogspot.com </li></ul>
  21. 21. References <ul><li>Dewey, J. (1916) . Democracy and education: An introduction to the philosophy of education . The MacMillian, USA. </li></ul><ul><li>Hutchison, E. (2008). Dimensions of human behavior: Person and environment (3 r d Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. </li></ul><ul><li>Siegel, E., Jennings, J. G., Conklin, J., & Napoletano-Flynn, S. A. (1998). Distance learning in social work education: Results and implications form a national survey. Journal of Social Work Education, 34, 71–80. </li></ul>

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