STKI 10th Annual 2010 CIO Bootcamp

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The 10th annual CIO Bootcamp January 2010 in Cesarea

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  • The U.S. and the global economies are coming to a crossroads that no one could have anticipated just a few years ago. Globalization and technology together are creating the potential for startling changes in how we do our jobs and the offices we do them in. Offshoring, for one, means work can be broken into smaller tasks and redistributed around the world. And the rapid growth of broader, richer channels of communication—including virtual worlds—is transforming what it means to be "at work." the impact of technology on the workplace, ranging from improved telecommuting to new techniques that help sleep-deprived workers, a serious problem in many occupations. In the future, advances in communication could enable new forms of workplace organization and mass collaboration of an unprecedented sort.
  • STKI 10th Annual 2010 CIO Bootcamp

    1. 1. 2010 CIO BOOTCAMP<br />WHAT A YEAR IT WILL BE: <br /> CAN WE FIND THE RIGHT BALANCE<br />Dr. Jimmy Schwarzkopf<br />Research Fellow<br />jimmy@stki.info<br />
    2. 2. 2<br />
    3. 3. www.stki.info<br />3<br />
    4. 4. 4<br />
    5. 5. Digital Disruption: Mother of all Disruptions<br />Internet Revolution<br />Computer Revolution<br />Industrial Revolution<br />1 – 2010 AD<br />“Industrial Information Economy”<br />Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/31/World_GDP_Capita_1-2003_A.D.png<br />5<br />
    6. 6. Globalization and Technology<br />“Globalization and technology together are creating the potential for startling changes in how we do our jobs and the offices we do them in. <br />…the rapid growth of broader, richer channels of communication – including virtual worlds – is transforming what it means to be at work.”<br />Business Week “The Future of Work”<br />“Wealth in the new economy flows directly from innovation, not optimization”<br />Kevin Kelly<br /> Wired Magazine<br />6<br />
    7. 7. Is this innovation ????<br />7<br />
    8. 8. 8<br />
    9. 9. -&quot;The fact of the matter is, this is not a downturn, this is a bit of a reset”-<br />9<br />Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer : CES keynote speech 6/1/2010<br />
    10. 10. 10<br />
    11. 11. Virtually free and unlimited:bandwidth and storage<br />Storage and bandwidth, already fairly substantial, are improving performance and cost efficiency even faster than processor speed is .  <br />The marginal cost is falling to practically zero.<br />Abundance Economy<br />11<br />
    12. 12. “Waste Transistors”<br />12<br />
    13. 13. “Waste Storage”<br />“Over 2775.261837 megabytes (and counting) of free storage so you&apos;ll never need to delete another message”<br />(Remember “Your mailbox is full”? What was that about?)<br />13<br />
    14. 14. “Waste Bandwidth”<br />14<br />
    15. 15. Scarcity<br />Abundance<br />15<br />
    16. 16. The Abundance of Choice<br />16<br />
    17. 17. The Market Has Changed<br />We <br />Have<br />everything <br />we<br />NEED<br />So now,<br /> we buy only <br />what<br />we <br />WANT<br />17<br />
    18. 18. Scarcity<br />Abundance<br />18<br />
    19. 19. Scarcity<br />Abundance<br />19<br />
    20. 20. Scarcity<br />Abundance<br />20<br />
    21. 21. The way we market and our products and services<br />Biggest change of all<br />21<br />
    22. 22. “Businesses can no longer rely on traditional forms of &quot;interruption marketing&quot; in magazines, mailings, telemarketing, radio or television”.<br />“Permission Marketing”<br />22<br />
    23. 23. “Permission Marketing” is the opposite of “Interruption” Marketing<br />It doesn’t interrupt people’s time, space or peace of mind <br />23<br />
    24. 24. What is our first question?<br />New relationship<br /> marketing<br />24<br />
    25. 25. So only the people who are genuinely interested in what you’re selling, hear from you...<br /> ...you&apos;re on your way to establishing a long-term relationship with them and making a sale <br />25<br />
    26. 26. 26<br />What is happening today? <br />
    27. 27. Disruptive Innovations<br />27<br />disruptive innovation<br />
    28. 28. We may be at one of those moments now:Industrial Information Technologies<br />r<br />SPEED<br />Infinite bandwidth and going for real-time data<br />SCALE<br />Unprecedented processing power and storage sizes<br />SENSORS<br />New kinds of data and data analysis<br />28<br />
    29. 29. When will have Industrial Revolution Machines ?<br />The Austin 7 was produced <br />from 1922 through to 1939 <br /> by the Austin Motor Company. <br />33 years<br />The Karl Benz Patent Motorwagen (or motorcar), built in 1885, is widely regarded as the first automobile, that is, a vehicle designed to be propelled by a motor.<br />29<br />
    30. 30. 30<br />
    31. 31. 31<br />
    32. 32. Winners and losers: who now?<br />32<br />
    33. 33. Innovation: Forgetting Assumptions<br />Trends that will Shape the Digital World over the Next Decade<br />
    34. 34. CIO Agenda?<br />34<br />
    35. 35. Technology adoption life cycle<br />Industrial Information Technologies:<br />Business Event Processing<br />Data Center Management<br />Cloud Computing<br />Industry in a Box<br />Mobile<br />Web 3 <br />MassMarket<br />Adoption<br />LateAdopters<br />Early Adopters<br />The Chasm<br />Technology Enthusiasts<br />Pragmatists<br />Conservatives<br />Sceptics<br />Visionaries<br />Adapted from Geoffrey Moore’s “Crossing the Chasm”<br />
    36. 36. Business Event Processing<br />Every 20 years a new disruptive innovation changes the way we do IT<br />2010s<br />1990s<br />1970s<br />
    37. 37. Business Event Processing<br />
    38. 38. Business Event Processing <br />38<br />
    39. 39. Business Event Processing:when and what <br />
    40. 40.
    41. 41. The IT ecosystem: <br />
    42. 42. Balancing Act<br />42<br />
    43. 43. Risk related to “cost cutting”<br />43<br />
    44. 44.
    45. 45. 2009: one of the worst years in history <br />45<br />100s different <br />Software products<br />Energy waste<br />25% utilization x86 servers<br />30% max in<br />Storage Utilization<br />Ala-carte<br />telecomm services<br />Hundreds of Enterprise Processes<br />24X7<br />complexity<br />unstable<br />
    46. 46. Standardized Equipment Economies Of Scale <br />46<br />* From SYMANTEC<br />
    47. 47. What do we expect by 2011<br />Service Delivery<br />Operational<br />Service Mgmt<br />Financial Mgmt<br />Service Support<br />Governance and<br />Risk Mgmt<br />Resource Mgmt<br />IT Prjct & Prtf Mgmt<br />IT Asset Mgmt<br />Service Automation<br />CMBD<br />Governance<br /><ul><li>IT alignment
    48. 48. Cost transparency
    49. 49. Cost mgmt
    50. 50. Risk mgmt
    51. 51. Supplier mgmt
    52. 52. Contract mgmt
    53. 53. HR mgmt</li></li></ul><li>Computing Platform Lifecycle<br />
    54. 54. 1980 -2010 Platform Lifecycle<br />2010s ?<br />
    55. 55. Industry in a Box Companies <br />50<br />
    56. 56. Virtual Connectvirtualized LAN and SANconnections<br />Insight SoftwareCapacity PlanningOrchestrationDisaster Recovery<br />StorageWorks EVA SAN<br />(Note: Matrix supports any c-Class certified FC SAN target)<br />Integrity andProLiant blade servers<br />All-in-One Services, plus ProLiant iCAP and pay as you grow financing<br />What’s under the hood<br />51<br />
    57. 57. 52<br />What’s under the hood 2<br />
    58. 58. A huge paradigm shift is underway<br />53<br />
    59. 59. 54<br />
    60. 60. Cloud Service Layers<br />Service<br />Providers<br />Service Users<br />Cloud End-User Services (SaaS)<br />Cloud Platform Services (PaaS)<br />Cloud Providers<br />Cloud Infrastructure Services (IaaS)<br />Physical Infrastructure<br />
    61. 61. Example: Desktop Cloud<br />56<br />
    62. 62. Cloud Computing: Application Models<br />On Demand<br />CPUs<br />Printing<br />Service<br />CRM<br />Service<br />User<br />Office<br />Apps<br />Data<br />Storage<br />Service<br />Cloud <br />Provider #1<br />Enterprise<br />Cloud <br />Provider #2<br />Backup<br />Service <br />Service<br />Employee<br />Service<br />ILM<br />Service<br />Service<br />Service 3<br />Business<br />Apps/Service<br />Internal Cloud<br />…<br />The <br />Internet<br />…<br />…<br />
    63. 63. Delegating the Power to the Cloud<br />58<br />
    64. 64. 59<br />
    65. 65. 60<br />
    66. 66. If looks could kill <br />Examples of <br />“new decade”<br />innovation<br />61<br />
    67. 67. What is Amazon ?<br /> “Man is the creator of change in this world. <br /> As such he should be above systems and<br /> structures, and not subordinate to them.” <br />62<br />
    68. 68. 63<br />
    69. 69. Downloads works in Israel<br /> and also<br />Hebrew pdf s<br />64<br />
    70. 70. “Wealth in the new economy flows directly from innovation, not optimization”<br />Kevin Kelly<br /> Wired Magazine<br />3 trends that will Shape the Digital World over the Next Decade<br />65<br />
    71. 71. 66<br />
    72. 72. Platform vs. Open vs. Reliable<br />Obama staffers could not  work: a  &quot;generation&quot; gap in technology<br />Looks like the Bush administration, like many organizations worldwide,  used old reliable Microsoft<br />67<br />
    73. 73. WiMax<br />64-128 GB<br />68<br />
    74. 74. iSlate: <br />69<br />
    75. 75. 70<br />
    76. 76. 71<br />
    77. 77. iPhone Israeli Ecosystem: 1+ million devices and 100,000 applications<br />2 billion downloads<br />
    78. 78. 73<br />
    79. 79. Example of applications<br />74<br />
    80. 80. Starbucks iPhone app<br />
    81. 81. Finance Applications <br />76<br />
    82. 82. Other ecosystems: blackberry <br />77<br />
    83. 83. 78<br />
    84. 84. 79<br />
    85. 85. 80<br />
    86. 86. Google Wave<br />81<br />
    87. 87. Google into other things?<br />Crome OS<br />Nexus 1 Android<br />82<br />
    88. 88. 83<br />
    89. 89. 84<br />
    90. 90. Three models for mass behavior<br />1841 2004 1984<br />Mass folly:<br /><ul><li> Real opportunity
    91. 91. Excitement
    92. 92. Greed
    93. 93. Speculation
    94. 94. Corruption
    95. 95. Fear/panic
    96. 96. Collapse
    97. 97. Restoration</li></ul> Emergent:<br /><ul><li> Complex systems
    98. 98. Maths, physics
    99. 99. Cellular automata
    100. 100. Biology, evolution
    101. 101. Organizational dynamics
    102. 102. Social systems
    103. 103. Network dynamics
    104. 104. Adaptation, robustness</li></ul>Collective judgment:<br /><ul><li> Cooperative space
    105. 105. Diverse participants
    106. 106. Honest participation
    107. 107. Opinion independence
    108. 108. Equality of opinion
    109. 109. Clear tasks
    110. 110. Accepted rules
    111. 111. System confidence</li></ul>85<br />
    112. 112. Croudsourcing: Markets 2.0<br /><ul><li>Traditional market 1.0 model: central organization serving many individuals
    113. 113. Large-scale impersonal markets
    114. 114. Low preference expression
    115. 115. Market 2.0 model: flexible dynamic capital allocation systems that provide democratic, more immediate, low-cost, affinity-directed capital
    116. 116. Benefits to individuals: freedom, convenience, preferences articulation
    117. 117. Benefits to groups: virtual aggregation of group power to conduct transactions</li></ul>Traditional Market 1.0 Model<br />Market 2.0 Models<br />Many: One<br />Peer finance<br />One: Many<br />Affinity purchasing<br />Many: Many<br />Prediction markets<br />Peer philanthropy<br />86<br />
    118. 118. WEB 1.0: Media companies put content in the web and push it to users<br />. <br />Low content variety<br />Content production is slow and expensive<br />Professional authors<br />Create content based on what they think people want<br />Managers<br />Hand-manage publishing businesses<br />Push!<br />Push!<br />Users = consumers<br />Users consume professionally produced content<br />87<br />
    119. 119. WEB 2.0: New platforms allow users to generate content themselves<br />High content variety<br />dramatically increases, while technical quality goes down. <br />User generated content<br />Blogs, videos, photos, music etc. <br />Authoring platforms<br />enable everyone to publish!<br />Web2.0 managers<br />are hand-managing the platforms<br />Professional authors <br />can still publish, but are competing with – everyone!<br />Users = authors<br />users generate content<br />88<br />
    120. 120. METAweb (web 3): Business platforms empower everyone to become a (media) entrepreneur<br />Business tools<br />Full scale media management tools for everyone<br />User generated content<br />Blogs, videos, photos, music etc. <br />User generated business<br />Premium content, advertising, e-commerce<br />Business platforms <br />Everyone can manage <br />Authoring platforms<br />enable everyone to publish!<br />Build business<br />Publish<br />Users = entrepreneurs<br />users generate business!<br />89<br />
    121. 121. web1.0<br />web2.0<br />METAweb<br />Management<br />Delivery<br />Creation<br />So what are the differences ?<br />90<br />
    122. 122. 91<br />
    123. 123. Tribes: a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader, and connected to an idea. <br />Discussion:<br />What builds tribes?<br />What kills tribes?<br />What sustains tribes?<br />92<br />
    124. 124. Study by Prof. Granovetter shows that weak links are better than strong<br /><ul><li>Strong Links: More motivation to help you, since they know you better
    125. 125. Weak Links : Likely less overlap with leads you can easily get elsewhere</li></ul>Most job referrals come through those who we see rarely: old school friends, former co-workers, etc.<br />93<br />
    126. 126. 94<br />
    127. 127. Enterprise social software is growing…<br />95<br />blogs<br />forums<br />microblogging<br />wikis<br />video<br />social bookmarking<br />photos<br />podcasts<br />
    128. 128. …but we’re creating a new set of silos.<br />96<br />Book-marks<br />Microblogs<br />Blogs<br />Photos<br />Podcasts<br />Wikis<br />Video<br />Forums<br />
    129. 129. Video<br />Wikis<br />Forums<br />Microblogs<br />Podcasts<br />Blogs<br />Bookmarks<br />Photos<br />New “family” <br />of products<br />Tying together enterprise social software <br />97<br />
    130. 130. What do I use ????<br /><ul><li>Blogs:
    131. 131. IT related
    132. 132. Economics
    133. 133. Musical taste:
    134. 134. ITunes
    135. 135. Books and others:
    136. 136. Amazon
    137. 137. Social Capital
    138. 138. LinkedIn
    139. 139. groups
    140. 140. Xing
    141. 141. Facebook
    142. 142. No longer need a memory
    143. 143. Google
    144. 144. Yahoo
    145. 145. Wikipedia
    146. 146. Twitter
    147. 147. Personal Information
    148. 148. Smartphone tells me about birthdays, phones, addresses</li></ul>98<br />98<br />
    149. 149. 99<br />
    150. 150. What do you use ?<br />Social Technographics™ Josh Bernoff, co-author of Groundswell<br />100<br />
    151. 151. 101<br />
    152. 152. 010<br />Thank you<br />Dr. Jimmy Schwarzkopf<br />102<br />

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