Smithville R-II School District

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This presentation was made to K-12 teachers at the school district at Smithville, Missouri. It focuses on what research and theories say about mathematics teaching and learning that can result in high achievement and positive attitude and consistent with learning for the 21st century economy and society.

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Smithville R-II School District

  1. 1. Smithville R-II School District professional development for teachers of mathematics Presentation Slides are available at www.banhar.blogspot.com
  2. 2. teaching math the way it should be taught yeap ban har www.banhar.blogspot.com
  3. 3. High Achievement, Positive Attitude
  4. 4. Low Achievement, Desperate Economy “Upon separation from Malaysia in 1965, Singapore was faced with … high levels of unemployment and poverty. Seventy percent of Singapore’s households lived in badly overcrowded conditions, and a third of its people squatted in slums on the city fringes. Unemployment averaged 14%, GDP per capita was less than $2,700, and half of the population was illiterate.”
  5. 5. Score 1960-1970s 1980s 500’s Japan Hong Kong Japan Korea 400’s Thailand Japan South Korea China Philippines Singapore Thailand Taiwan Hong Kong 300’s Vietnam | Hanusek, Jamison, Jamison & Woessmann 2008 Thailand Malaysia Singapore Indonesia Philippines
  6. 6. | Hanusek, Jamison, Jamison & Woessmann 2008 In 1980’s, new approaches in teaching and learning math were piloted in Singapore schools.
  7. 7. Score 1960-1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 500’s Japan Hong Kong Japan Korea Hong Kong Japan Korea Singapore Hong Kong Japan Korea Singapore 400’s Thailand Philippines Singapore Thailand Malaysia Thailand Malaysia Thailand Indonesia Philippines Indonesia Philippines 300’s | Hanusek, Jamison, Jamison & Woessmann 2008 In 1992, the problem-solving curriculum was formally introduced in Grade 1 and Grade 7.
  8. 8. Country % of Low Performers % of High Performers Mean Shanghai 3.8 55.4 613 Singapore 8.3 40.0 573 Hong Kong 8.5 33.7 561 South Korea 9.1 30.9 554 Japan 11.1 23.7 536 Finland 12.3 15.3 519 OECD 23.1 12.6 494 | PISA 2012 | MacPherson Primary School, Singapore
  9. 9. Country % of Low Performers % of High Performers Mean Singapore 8.3 40.0 573 Vietnam 14.2 13.3 511 Thailand 49.7 2.6 427 Malaysia 51.8 1.3 421 Indonesia 75.7 0.3 375 OECD 23.1 12.6 494 | PISA 2012 | Bina Bangsa School, Indonesia
  10. 10. Country % of High Performers Mean Singapore 8.3 40.0 573 Vietnam 14.2 13.3 511 Thailand 49.7 2.6 427 Malaysia 51.8 1.3 421 Indonesia | Nanyang Primary School, Singapore % of Low Performers 75.7 0.3 375 OECD 23.1 12.6 494 | PISA 2012
  11. 11. Problem-Solving Approach Case Study: Addition of Whole Numbers
  12. 12. Addition of Whole Numbers Grade 1 Lesson Anchor Task Add 6 and 8 | Seoul Foreign School South Korea
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  20. 20. CPA Approach Case Study: Division of Fractions
  21. 21. Division of Fractions Grade 5 Lesson Anchor Task 1 2 3 | Anglo Chinese Junior College, Singapore
  22. 22. Emphasis on Visuals Case Study: Word Problems
  23. 23. National Test Item Mr Lee baked 185 more chicken pies than tuna pies. After selling 3/5 of the chicken pies and half of the tuna pies, he had 146 pies left. How many pies did he sell?
  24. 24. Challenging Problems in Formal Assessment Case Study: Division of Fractions
  25. 25. National Test Item A fruit stall sold pears at 70 cents each and apples at 40 cents each. Sally bought some pears and Tom bought some apples from the fruit stall. Sally spent $1.10 more than Tom, but had 7 fruits fewer than Tom. (a) How many pears did Sally buy? (b) How much did Tom spend on the apples?

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