Global Forum on Singapore Mathematics Paper 3

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Global Forum on Singapore Mathematics Paper 3

  1. 1. Lesson Study in Japan<br />What Singapore Can Learn From The World<br />Yeap Ban Har<br />Marshall Cavendish Institute, Singapore<br />Marshall Cavendish Singapore Mathematics Global Forum 2010<br />Professional Development in the Philippines<br />
  2. 2. Singapore has always learnt from other countries.<br />
  3. 3. Our learning is derived from, in some countries, studying their work, and, in others, from doing work there.<br />
  4. 4. An Agenda for Action<br />United States of America 1980<br />
  5. 5. Cockcroft Report<br />England 1980<br />
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Literature and Research Used in Teacher Education Courses are predominantly based on work done by academics in North America, England and Australia.<br />
  8. 8. bruner’s theory<br />concrete<br />mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Malaysia<br />
  9. 9. concrete<br />experiences<br />mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Malaysia<br />
  10. 10. mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Malaysia<br />from<br />concrete<br />to<br />pictorial<br />
  11. 11. from<br />pictorial<br />to<br />abstract<br />All Kids Are Intelligent Series<br />
  12. 12. symbols<br />mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Malaysia<br />
  13. 13. singapore<br />How Assessment System Brought About Changes in Classroom Practices<br />Catholic High School, Singapore<br />
  14. 14. National Assessment Items<br />Challenging Problems <br />A restaurant had the same number of apples, oranges and pears at first. After 38 pears, some apples and oranges are used, there were 90 fruits left. There were twice as many apples as oranges left. The number of pears left was 15 fewer than the number of apples left.<br />How many oranges were used?<br />Basic<br />Find the value of 12.2 ÷ 4.<br />Familiar Problems<br />Pens are only sold in packets of 5 pens. Each packet is sold at $7. Gopal has $30. How many pens can he buy at most?<br />
  15. 15. japan<br />How Collaborative Authentic Professional Development Spreads Good Practices<br />Public Research Lesson in Japan<br />
  16. 16. Identify Research Theme<br />Plan Lesson<br />Research Lesson<br />Lesson Plan Revision<br />Post-Lesson Discussion<br />
  17. 17. Fuchun Primary School, Singapore<br />
  18. 18. china<br />Mathematical <br />Rigour<br />
  19. 19.
  20. 20. USA<br />Scarsdale Teachers’ Institute<br />Towards a Core Standards<br />Edgewood Elementary School, New York<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22. Edgewood Elementary School, New York<br />I think of 1 and 2.<br />I make 12.<br />I make 3 from 1 + 2.<br />I find the difference between 12 and 3 – nine! <br />
  23. 23. Many states in the US introduce probability earlier. Should we introduce certain topics earlier? Should we stick to our present scope and sequence? What about statistics given its importance?<br />
  24. 24. We learn as we provide professional developments in other countries – we now know some things are tied to culture while others are culture-free.<br />
  25. 25. indonesia<br />Large-Scale Adoption<br />BinaBangsa School, Indonesia<br />
  26. 26. BinaBangsa School, Indonesia<br />
  27. 27. philippines<br />integrating Singapore Math into an alternative school<br />Keys Grade School, The Philippines<br />
  28. 28. x<br />Keys Grade School, The Philippines<br />
  29. 29. Keys Grade School, The Philippines<br />
  30. 30. Keys Grade School, The Philippines<br />
  31. 31. chile<br />improving the math program<br />Public Research Lesson in Chile<br />
  32. 32. cambodia<br />enthusiasm despite lack of resources<br />Khemarak University, Cambodia<br />
  33. 33. We have learnt much about adapting a rigourous teacher professional development programme to local culture and conditions.<br />
  34. 34. “Children are trulythe future of our nation. “<br />Irving Harris<br />Children in Indonesia<br />
  35. 35. mathematics<br />using to develop<br />children’s<br />intelligence<br />
  36. 36. 4<br />7<br />47<br />11<br />Edgewood Elementary School, New York, USA<br />47 – 11 <br />
  37. 37. Edgewood Elementary School, New York, USA<br />
  38. 38.
  39. 39. TanjongPagar PCF Kindergarten Singapore<br />international<br />perspectives<br />mathematics<br />on<br />teaching<br />
  40. 40. What counts as mathematical proficiency?<br />
  41. 41. procedural fluency<br />Adding It Up<br />National Research Council<br />conceptual reasoning<br />Keys Grade School, Manila, The Philippines<br />
  42. 42. strategic competence<br />Keys Grade School, Manila, The Philippines<br />
  43. 43. 17<br />7<br />10<br />17 – 3 <br />adaptive reasoning<br />Keys Grade School, Manila, The Philippines<br />
  44. 44. productive disposition<br />Keys Grade School, Manila, The Philippines<br />
  45. 45. What counts as mathematical proficiency?<br />
  46. 46. mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Penang, Malaysia<br />Trends in<br />Mathematics<br />This whole shape stands for 1.<br />& Science Studies<br />What does this stand for?<br />apply<br />their understanding<br />and knowledge<br />in a variety of<br />complex situations<br />
  47. 47. Trends in<br />Mathematics<br />& ScienceStudy<br />explain<br />their reasoning<br />mathz4kidz Learning Centre, Penang, Malaysia<br />

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