BBS April 2010 Singapore Math in Indonesia by BBS Maths Consultant Dr Yeap Ban Har
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

BBS April 2010 Singapore Math in Indonesia by BBS Maths Consultant Dr Yeap Ban Har

on

  • 4,024 views

Teachers in Bina Bangsa School, from Kindergarten to Junior College, had their mathematics professional development with a focus on student engagement and designing problem-based lessons.

Teachers in Bina Bangsa School, from Kindergarten to Junior College, had their mathematics professional development with a focus on student engagement and designing problem-based lessons.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,024
Views on SlideShare
3,833
Embed Views
191

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
80
Comments
0

12 Embeds 191

http://singaporemathz4kidz.blogspot.com 84
http://banhar.blogspot.com 65
http://www.slideshare.net 13
http://www.banhar.blogspot.com 9
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 7
http://singaporemathz4kidz.blogspot.sg 4
http://www.banhar.blogspot.sg 3
http://banhar.blogspot.sg 2
http://banhar.blogspot.co.uk 1
http://banhar.blogspot.gr 1
http://banhar.blogspot.hk 1
http://singaporemathz4kidz.blogspot.ca 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

BBS April 2010 Singapore Math in Indonesia by BBS Maths Consultant Dr Yeap Ban Har BBS April 2010 Singapore Math in Indonesia by BBS Maths Consultant Dr Yeap Ban Har Presentation Transcript

  • BinaBangsa School
    professional development
    for mathematics teachers
    pedagogy for engagement
    and
    problem-based learning
    www.mmepdpm.pbworks.com
    Yeap Ban Har
  • To see examples of using problems to organize lessons so that students are engaged.
    To use lesson study structure to deepen our understanding of student engagement
    To provide platforms for learning to mastery – that means every student must have mastered the key focus of a lesson by the end of the lesson, and if not the next lesson should be designed for that
    To provide constant opportunities to develop 21st Century skills
    What are the goals of this workshop?
  • Example One
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
    problems
    for students
    to learn new ideas
  • Area > 2r2
  • Area < 4r2
  • 2r2 < Area < 4r2
  • 2r2 < Area < 4r2
  • 2r2 < r2 < 4r2
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Learning through Inquiry
  • problems
    for students
    to apply what they learn
    Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Example Two
  • Task 1 Find the longest distance between two points on a circle.
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Learning through Collaboration
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Learning through Collaboration
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Task 2 Measure circumference and diameter of four circles.
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • A teacher observing student engagement during the lesson.
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Task 3 Draw a circle given that its circumference is 6 metres.
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Used the relationship between circumference and circumference
  • Did not use the relationship between radius and circumference
  • Learning by Doing
  • Professional Learning
    Teachers discussing what they saw in the lesson, talking about how students can be taught to appreciate the significance of π and that its value is approximately 22/7.
    The circles were of radii 4 cm, 6 cm, 8 cm and 10 cm. Why would a circle of radius 7 cm be included?
    Singapore teachers doing PLC spend 2 hours a week on such activities to deepen their learning from workshops they have attended.
  • Example Three
  • North Vista Primary School, Singapore
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore
    Learning by Collaborating
  • Example Four
  • This problem is about a game between two players.
     
    n beans are placed between two players. They take turn to remove either 1 or 2 beans. They cannot remove any other number of beans. The winner is the one who takes the last 1 or 2 beans. If this cannot be done then the game ends in a draw.
     
    You are given about 50 beans to investigate the winning strategy for this game.
     
    Write a short essay that includes:
    1. a description of how the game is played
    2. a detailed description of how one can win a game
    3. an opinion on the statement ‘the player who starts will win the game’.
    [12]
     
    Anglo Singapore International School Bangkok 2010 Lower Secondary SA1
  • Learning by Reflecting
  • Example Five
  • All whole number can be written as a sum of consecutive whole numbers.
    Investigate this statement.
  • Learning through Inquiry
  • Example Six
  • Problem: What is half of one half? What is half of one third?
    DaQiao Primary School, Singapore
  • Example Seven
  • 12 ÷ 4 = 3
    1 ÷ ¾ = ?
  • 12 ÷ 4 = 3
    1 ÷ ¾ = ?
    1 ÷ ¾ =
    2 ÷ ¾ =
    3 ÷ ¾ =
    n ÷ ¾ =



  • 12 ÷ 4 = 3
    making
    connections
    3 ÷ ¾ = 4
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition Grade 6
  • How to make sure the butterfly cannot flyHow do you get a butterfly?First there is the egg which hatches into a caterpillar. The caterpillar eats and grows. At the right time, it makes a cocoon out of its own body. While in the cocoon, the caterpillar changes into a butterfly.When the butterfly is ready, it starts to break through the cocoon. First a hole appears. Then the butterfly struggles to come out through the hole. This can take a few hours.If you try to "help" the butterfly by cutting the cocoon, the butterfly will come out easily but it will never fly. Your "help" has destroyed the butterfly.The butterfly can fly because it has to struggle to come out. The pushing forces lots of enzymes from the body to the wing tips. This strengthens the muscles, and reduces the body weight. In this way, the butterfly will be able to fly the moment it comes out of the cocoon. Otherwise it will simply fall to the ground, crawl around with a swollen body and shrunken wings, and soon die.If the butterfly is not left to struggle to come out of the cocoon, it will never fly.We can learn an important lesson from the butterfly.Lim Siong GuanHead, Civil Service
  • Example Eight

  • Example Nine
  • The newspaper report stated that a draw would have sent Singapore to the Asian Cup Final. A team needed to finish first or second in their group to qualify for the Asian Cup Finals.
    Figure 1
  • The table shows the number of each team had played (P), won (W), drew (D), lost (L) as well as the numbers of goals it scored (F) and the numbers of goals it conceded (A). A team got 3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw and no point for a loss. The total number of points is shown in the last column (Pts).
    Figure 1
    The results of the last two matches in each group are shown in Figure 3.
    Use only the information available to explain why ”a draw would have sent Singapore to the Asian Cup Finals”.
  • Figure 3
  • Learning in and about the Real World
  • Example Ten
  • Best Chance to Score
    A soccer player is on a breakaway, dribbling the ball downfield, parallel to a sideline. From where should he shoot to have the best chance to score a goal?
  • PSLE2010 Problems
  • Cup cakes are sold at 40 cents each.
    What is the greatest number of cup cakes that can be bought with $95?
    $95 ÷ 40 cents = 237.5
    Answer: 237 cupcakes
    Basic Skill Item
  • Basic Application Item
    4 puffs for $2.80
    $50 ÷ $2.80 = 17.86 (to 2 decimal places)
    17 x $2.80 = $47.60
    $50 - $47.60 = $2.40  3 puffs
    (17 x 4 + 3) puffs = 71 puffs
  • Learning in and about the Real World
  • Engaging Students
    Learning through Inquiry
    Learning by Doing
    Leaning through Collaboration
    Learning through Reflection
    Learning in and about the Real World
  • Student Engagement in Research Lessons at BBS
  • Student Engagement in Research Lessons at BBS
  • PSLE2010 Problems
  • Application Item


  • 210
  • 210
    MrsHoon sold 960 cookies.
  • BinaBangsa School
    professional development
    for mathematics teachers
    problem-based learning
  • Primary Mathematics Standards Edition (Grade 6)
  • Example Eleven
  • Problem: Find the distance between points A (2, 3) and B (10, 9).
    Students working collaboratively on a problem to learn the coordinate geometry topic on distance between points. Traditionally, students were given a formulae to do this.
  • Every group was able to use their previous learning (Pythagoras Theorem) to solve the main problem)
  • Later they were asked to find the distance between the points (5, 1) and (9, 4). They were also asked to find points where the distance is a whole number.
  • 10
    5
    6
    3
    4
    8
    15
    12
    12
  • Problem-Based Lesson
    Find the distance between points A (2, 3) and B (10, 9).
    Find the distance between points C (-2, -2) and D (2, 1).
    Find the distance between points E (2, 5) and F (x, 2).
    Find two points where the distance is a whole number.
  • Group Task
    Design one double-period lesson based on a single problem with colleagues teaching the same level.
    Present your lesson to include
    The Problem
    Expected Solutions from Students
    Is the problem-based lesson to teach a new topic, for drill-and-practice or for applying knowledge?
    Please submit your problems via email banhar.yeap@nie.edu.sg or upload on www.mmepdpm.pbworks
  • What are the anticipated responses or difficulties?
    • Inquiry
    • Doing
    • Collaboration
    • Reflection
    • Real World
    • Content
    • Process
    • Skills 21
    Problem
    What is the topic or learning outcome?
  • Example Twelve
  • Teachers solved the problem of converting a square into an equilateral triangle of the same area. Three suggestions were forwarded.
  • Change the square into an equilateral triangle of the same area.
    Suggestion 1
  • Suggestion 2
  • Suggestion 3
  • Example Thirteen
  • A whole number that is equal to the sum of all its factors except itself is a perfect number.
    Find perfect numbers.
     
  • The ancient Christian scholar Augustine explained that God could have created the world in an instant but chose to do it in a perfect number of days, 6. Early Jewish commentators felt that the perfection of the universe was shown by the Moon's period of 28 days.
     
  •  
    The next in line are 496, 8128 and 33 550 336.
     
    As René Descartes pointed out perfect numbers like perfect men are very rare.
  • Example Fourteen
  • Problem: How is the circumference and diameter of a circle related?
    Fuchun Primary School, Singapore: Lesson Study
  • Professional Learning
    Teachers discussing what they saw in the lesson, talking about how students can be taught to appreciate the significance of π and that its value is approximately 22/7.
    The circles were of radii 4 cm, 6 cm, 8 cm and 10 cm. Why would a circle of radius 7 cm be included?
    Singapore teachers doing PLC spend 2 hours a week on such activities to deepen their learning from workshops they have attended.
  • Example Fifteen
  • Rectangle 1
    Rectangle 2
  • Problem: Make Rectangle 10.
  • Problem-Based Lesson
    Find the number of square tiles in Rectangle 10.
    Find the number of square tiles in Rectangle n where n is any large number.
    Which rectangle has 63 square tiles?
  • Find the area bounded by the curve
    the x-axis and lines x = 1 and x = 4.
    Problem to teach trapezium rule.
    Example 16
  • Two forces 3 N and 4 N are applied on an object. Find the resultant force on the object.
    Problem to teach vector addition.
    Example 17
  • Problem to teach measurement of volume of liquids.
    Example 18
  • PCF Kindergarten PasirRis West, Singapore
  • Example 19
  • How many non-congruent quadrilaterals can be made? Each quadrilateral is made using all the tangram pieces.
  • “Children are trulythe future of our nation. “
    Irving Harris