Tools For The Guitar Student
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Tools For The Guitar Student

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Chord charts, scale sheets and other information I use in my lessons.

Chord charts, scale sheets and other information I use in my lessons.

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  • 1. THE NAMES OF THE STRINGS! You SHOULD have 6 strings on your guitar. If you have less than that you have a broken one! Each string has a pitch and a number associated with it. The skinniest string at the end is the E or 1, then B (2), G(3), D(4), A(5) and E(6) I remember the string names going from “Fat to Thin” as Eddie (6), Ate (5) Dynamite (4) Good (3) Bye (2) Eddie (1) E (1) B (2) G (3) D (4) A (5) E (6) http://www.jimhickeymusic.com
  • 2. GUITAR TUNING: Relative Tuning Owning an electronic tuner should be part of every musicians gig-bag. If you do not have one (yet) you can still tune the instrument to itself to get on with things by using the Relative Tuning Method. Assuming your low-E (6th) String is tuned to pitch, Play the fifth fret of the 6th (low E) string and then play the open 5th (A) string and let both notes ring together. Their pitches should match exactly. If they don't seem quite right, determine whether the 5th string is higher or lower than the fretted 6th string. If the 5th string seems lower, or flat, turn its tuning key with your left hand to raise the pitch. If the 5th string seems sharp, or higher sounding, use its tuning key to lower the pitch. Repeat this 5th fret tuning process until you reach the G String. USE THE 4TH FRET TO FIND THE PITCH OF THE B STRING. Then, back to the 5th fret for the high E (1) String. Fret # 4th 5th E B E G B D G A D E A http://www.jimhickeymusic.com
  • 3. PRACTICE THE FINGER EXERCISE ACENDING AND DECENDING THE PAT- TERN FROM THE LOWEST NOTE (OPEN STRING) TO THE HIGHEST NOTE AND BACK AGAIN. • Go slow at first making sure you are fretting the note with no “buzzing” sound • Practice ALTERNATING PICKING with this exercise Lowest note Highest note E 0 1 2 3 4 B G D A E http://www.jimhickeymusic.com
  • 4. PRACTICE TIPS: Not sure what, when or how to practice? Here are some suggestions. • Beginners should schedule 30 minutes a day for practice. Practicing a little every day is more effective than practicing once a week for a long time. Suggested times: before bed, first thing in the morning, after homework, after work, lunch break, during TV time, before going out...turn off the cell phone and practice! • All other students, intermediate or advances players, should practice AT LEAST 30 minutes a day. • Always ask yourself before you sit down to practice “what can I do better?” and practice that activity that challenges you the most. Here are common items to practice for the aspiring musician. Studying the notes on the fret board. Sight Reading. Chord Tran- sitions. Alternating Picking. Strumming patterns. Work on a song or chord progression. Barre Chord Forms. Scales. Do you have these items mastered yet? • Always pick one activity from your lesson and master it before moving on to another activity. • Electric students should practice while using their amplifier. • How about practicing your Finger Exercises, Alternating Picking and other “motor skills” while watching TV? • Make a list of questions you would like to review with your instructor. http://www.jimhickeymusic.com
  • 5. JIM HICKEY MUSIC LTD Practice Agenda To be the best musician you can be, you have to practice. Set aside a minimum of 30 minutes a day to work on the assignments given to you by your instructor. This sheet has been pro- vided for you to record your practice time. Put down the video game and PLAY! STUDENT NAME:_________________________________ DAY AND TIME_________________ DATE LESSON MON TUE WED THR FRI SAT SUN OK? ASSIGNMENT WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 6. JIM HICKEY MUSIC LTD CAGED FORMS Am A A7 C Form X X X 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 3 1 1 1 2 3 4 Em E E7 A Form X 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 Dm D7 D G Form X X X X X X 1 1 2 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 3 4 B7 C C7 E Form X X X 1 1 1 2 3 4 2 2 1 1 1 3 3 4 2 3 4 F G G7 D Form X X X X 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 7. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &
  • 8. 1 & 2 & 3 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 1 & 2 & 3 &
  • 9. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 & 6 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 & 6 &
  • 10. A The Notes… A# Bb Learning the notes of the fret board re- quires a little effort. On the left are all the notes in western music. B I have highlighted the E, A, D, G, and C B notes which are the open strings of a 6 string guitar in standard tuning. C# Db Each ascending note is one fret D (or 1/2 step) on the guitar neck. D# Eb To find the notes on each string, simply follow the arrows until you return to E your original note. Example: to find the notes on the D F string, follow the notes from D to the bottom of the page, then return to the F# Gb top and continue until you return to the D again. That will give you every note G from the open string to the 12th fret from D to D! G# Ab
  • 11. JIM HICKEY MUSIC LTD Fill in the blanks with all the notes on the 6 string guitar neck E A D G B E 1st Fret 2nd Fret 3rd Fret 4th Fret 5th Fret 6th Fret 7th Fret 8th Fret 9th Fret 10th Fret 11th Fret 12th Fret WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 12. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Common Root 5 Barre Chord Forms Major Minor 7 (Dominant) Major 7 Minor 7th Sus 4 Sus 2 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 13. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Common Root 6 Barre Chord Forms Major Minor 7 (Dominant) Major 7 Minor 7th Sus 4 7 Sus 4 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 14. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Suspended/sus Chord Forms (Open) D Sus 2 D Sus 4 A Sus 2 A Sus 4 E Sus 4 G Sus 2 G Sus 4 C Sus 2 C Sus 4 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 15. TRIAD CHORD FORMS E (1),B (2), AND G (3) STRINGS Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On E1 B2 G3 Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On E1 B2 G3 These chord forms contain the same notes of the chords you would play in open position. These CHORD INVERSION forms are widely used in soloing and rhythm guitar to embellish a chord progression. It is important to know where the notes are on the E, B, and G strings to make these chords work for you. Root Note =
  • 16. TRIAD CHORD FORMS E(6), A(5), AND D (4) STRINGS Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On E6 A5 D4 Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On E6 A5 D4 These chord forms contain the same notes of the chords you would play in open position. Learn these CHORD INVERSION forms to em- bellish a chord progression. It is important to know where the notes are on the E, A, and D strings to make these chords work for you. Root Note =
  • 17. TRIAD CHORD FORMS D(4), G(3), AND B(2) STRINGS Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On D4 G3 B2 Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On D4 G3 B2 These chord forms contain the same notes of the chords you would play in open position. These CHORD INVERSION forms are widely used in soloing and rhythm guitar to sometimes brighten up a chord progression. It is important to know where the notes are on the D, G, and B strings to make these chords work for you. Root Note =
  • 18. RECAP: MAJOR INVERSIONS Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On E6 A5 D4 Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On D4 G3 B2 Major Root On Major Root On Major Root On E1 B2 G3
  • 19. RECAP: MINOR INVERSIONS Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On E6 A5 D4 Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On D4 G3 B2 Minor Root On Minor Root On Minor Root On E1 B2 G3
  • 20. -,0 +,&.(< $// 5,*+76 5(6(59(' + . / *C C , ' $ CC ( * % 0LQRU -C CCC & .HV ) ) ) & CCCC %E (E * CCC CCCC )C CC CCC CCC CCC - / + * . ,C +C /C 7KH &LUFOH RI WKV , FDQ ZULWH D VHFRQG ERRN RQ KRZ WR UHDG WKH &LUFOH RI WKV LQ LW¶V HQWLUHW EXW KHUH LV WKH ³LPPHGLDWH QHHG WR NQRZ´ KRSH RX OLNH LW , PDGH LW PVHOI 7KLV LV D WHUULILF WRRO WR XVH LI RX DUH EHJLQQLQJ WR UHDG PXVLF DV ZHOO DV KHOSLQJ RX XQGHUVWDQG WKH EDVV JXLWDU IUHW ERDUG 7KH OHWWHUV RQ WKH RXWVLGH RI WKH FLUFOH DUH 0DMRU .HV 7KH OHWWHUV LQVLGH WKH FLUFOH DUH WKH QRWHV RI WKH 5HODWLYH 0LQRU .H $V RX JR DURXQG WKH FKDUW FORFNZLVH HDFK QRWH LV D ³3HUIHFW WK ,QWHUYDO´ WR WKH SUHYLRXV QRWH &RXQWHUFORFNZLVH WKH QRWH LV WKH ³ WK ,QWHUYDO´ )RU WKRVH RI XV ZKR DUH EHJLQQLQJ WR UHDG VWDQGDUG QRWDWLRQ WKH FLUFOH DOVR IHDWXUHV KRZ PDQ VKDUSV RU IODWV DUH UHSUHVHQWHG RQ VKHHW PXVLF IRU ERWK PDMRU DQG PLQRU NHV 0HPRUL]H WKLV FKDUW DQG NHHS D FRS LQ RXU JLJ EDJ WKH FLUFOH RI WKV LV D JUHDW ³FKHDW VKHHW´ IRU DQ %DVVLVW RU *XLWDULVW
  • 21. JIM HICKEY ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Modesô How do they work together? One of the most common questions asked...People being people, we learn things in different ways so below is a diagram displaying how modes work as it pertains to the Major Scale. The example below is in the Key of C Major IONIAN C D E F G A B DORIAN D E F G A B C PHRYGIAN E F G A B C D LYDIAN F G A B C D E MIXOLYDIAN G A B C D E F AEOLIAN (Minor) A B C D E F G LOCRIAN B C D E F G A IONIAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 DORIAN 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 PHRYGIAN 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 LYDIAN 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 MIXOLYDIAN 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 AEOLIAN (Minor) 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 LOCRIAN 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 53
  • 22. Jim Hickey Music Ltd IONIAN/MAJOR MIXOLYDIAN X X DORIAN AEOLIAN/MINOR PHRYGIAN LOCRIAN LYDIAN = Root Note X = Use Either/Or in scale http://www.jimhickeymusic.com/
  • 23. Jim Hickey Music Ltd IONIAN/MAJOR (DO) MIXOLYDIAN (SO) OR OR DORIAN (RA) AEOLIAN/MINOR (LA) PHRYGIAN (ME) LOCRIAN (TE) LYDIAN (FA) = ROOT NOTE http://www.jimhickeymusic.com/
  • 24. Jim Hickey Music Ltd MINOR PENTATONIC MAJOR PENTATONIC MODE 3 MODE 4 MODE 5 http://www.jimhickeymusic.com/
  • 25. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Notes and Interval Relationships: Pentatonic Scale Studying the notes in the scale and recognize those notes as intervals will help you apply and use the Modes more effectively. The notes in the A Minor Pentatonic Scale are A,C,D,E and G. If we were A to spread out these notes on the E string of the Guitar, it would look like this: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 E G A C D E A The intervals are A=1, C=2, D=3, E=4, G=5, as illustrated below: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 1 2 3 4 So, for the key of A Minor, you would apply the modes as such: A(1) = Minor; C (2) = Major; D (3) = Mode 3; E (4) = Mode 4; G (5) = Mode 5 The pages to follow have diagrams of the Minor Pentatonic scale in the remaining 11 keys. After recognizing the intervals, fill in the blanks with the note names as they correspond with interval numbers and mode names. The Major Pentatonic modes can be applied by starting on interval number 2 as that is the Major Pentatonic interval from the Minor Pentatonic scale. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 26. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM 0 A #/Bb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 1 2 3 So, for the key of A#/Bb Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 1 2 3 So, for the key of B Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 1 2 So, for the key of C Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 C#/Db 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 1 2 So, for the key of C#/Db Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 27. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM 0 D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 1 So, for the key of D Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 D#/Eb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 1 So, for the key of D#/Eb Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 1 So, for the key of E Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 F 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 So, for the key of F Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 28. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM 0 1 F#/Gb 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 1 2 3 4 5 So, for the key of F#/Gb Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 G 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 1 2 3 4 So, for the key of G Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 0 G#/Ab 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 1 2 3 4 So, for the key of G#/Ab Minor, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Minor; __ (2) = Major; __ (3) = Mode 3; __ (4) = Mode 4; __ (5) = Mode 5 HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 29. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Notes and Interval Relationships: Major Scale Studying the notes in the scale and recognize those notes as intervals will help you apply and use the Modes more effectively. The notes in the key of C Major are C,D,E,F,G,A, and B. If we were to spread out these notes on the E string of the guitar, it would look like this: 0 1 C 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 E F G A B C D E The intervals are C=1, D=2, E=3, F=4, G=5, A=6, B=7. Illustrated below: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 So, for the key of C Major, you would apply the modes as such: C (1) = Ionian; D (2) = Dorian; E (3) = Phrygian; F (4) = Lydian; G (5) = Mixolydian; A (6) = Aeolian; B (7) = Locrian The pages to follow have diagrams of the Major scale in the remaining 11 keys. After recognizing the intervals, fill in the blanks with the note names as they correspond with interval numbers and mode names. “What about the Minor Scale?” As the minor scale is the 6th mode of the Major scale, it would be redundant to chart that out. Simply change the 6th interval to a number1 and change the rest of the ascending notes to 2,3,4,5,6,7. Then you have it. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 30. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM Below each illustration, fill out the Notes that are in each scale next to the interval number: E 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 So, for the key of E Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 F 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 So, for the key of F Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 F#/Gb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 So, for the key of F#/Gb Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian G 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 So, for the key of G Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 31. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM G#/Ab 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 So, for the key of G#/Ab Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian A 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 So, for the key of A Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 A#/Bb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 So, for the key of A#/Bb Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 So, for the key of B Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 32. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM C#/Db 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 So, for the key of C#/Db Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 So, for the key of D Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian 0 D#/Eb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 So, for the key of D#/Eb Major, you would apply the modes as such: __(1) = Ionian; __ (2) = Dorian; __ (3) = Phrygian; __ (4) = Lydian; __ (5) = Mixolydian; __ (6) = Aeolian; __ (7) = Locrian HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 33. Jim Hickey Music Ltd Instructor Notes: Date: WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM
  • 34. HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM HTTP://WWW.JIMHICKEYMUSIC.COM