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mHealth Technologies that are Working and Obstacles to Innovation by Jim Bloedau
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mHealth Technologies that are Working and Obstacles to Innovation by Jim Bloedau

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Presented as general trends at GMIC Mobility conference October 2013

Presented as general trends at GMIC Mobility conference October 2013

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business

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  • House Cleaning Announcements Introductions
  • There’s a lot to know. A main challenge and “Must” is to be “Buzz Word Compliant” Example: Formula The secret is to say it “hard, strong and fast” and people will think you know what you are talking about. But seriously, these terms are important ….and my favorite is…
  • OR …
  • But seriously… Take this type of enthusiasm out of today’s discussion and put a real face on what the problem. What’s worked and what can we plan on doing to meet the next decade of healthcare’s unmet needs. …An the best way I know how to do that is….put a face to it.
  • A 64-year-old Mississippi man with severe COPD and kidney disease is repeatedly hospitalized for worsening heart, lung and kidney failure; Doctors don't know that his utilities have been disconnected, leaving him without air conditioning or a refrigerator in the sweltering summer heat.
  • A young woman with severe bipolar disorder spends more than 300 days in a Los Angeles hospital and nursing home because she can't afford a special bed or arrange services that would enable her to live at home.
  • A very sweet 66-year-old hypertensive woman with CHF breaks her ankle, develops a blood clot and, unable to find a doctor to monitor her blood-thinning drug, winds up in an emergency room 30 times over the next year. ….who says that healthcare can’t be fun?
  • These patients are among the 1 percent that fills our hospitals and ICU Nearly $1.3 trillion Americans spent on health care in 2010, at a cost of nearly $88,000 per person. Five percent of patients accounted for 50 percent of all health-care expenditures. By contrast, the bottom 50 percent of patients accounted for just 2.8 percent of spending that year, according to a recent report by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
  • No one is denying that the challenge to care for those with chronic diseases will not lesson. Cancers, Mental Disorders and Diabetes are the “growth areas.” Pulmonary, Hypertension, Mental Disorders and Heart Conditions hit the greatest number of people
  • 80% of patients go home and get better by themselves. To control costs for the rest, we’ve shifted more to post acute care and the home. It’s cheaper. Growth in acute care spending has flattened some . This has pushed care to the home, caregivers, and family members - theywill carry more of the load.
  • The good news is that we have seen an increase in multi generational household since about 1980. Even a higher percentage of younger people living at home –tech savvy. Problem smaller families and decreasing caregivers will drive needs for greater efficiencies in the home care arena.
  • Another important trend is Providers as Developers Started branding their own apps around 2009 Very basic, mostly CRM, disseminating news and events, offering patient education, soliciting feedback or non-clinical communication, navigations and directions, some scheduling, physician directories and appointment booking. Scant health trackers of various stripes, medication reminders, Rx refills, and secure messaging.
  • FDAstarted looking at Apps in 2009 “..to start a conversation.” 75 Class II devices – mobihealthnews study 1973 first wireless phone demonstrated at Motorola. 1983 “The Brick” was the first commercial mobile phone, half hour talk time, 2.5 pound, $3,995.00
  • In a healthcare world where cost is everything, how do we use mobile as we move toward “zero cost diagnostics.?” Printable chips, like nicotine patches Rubbery polyester that can wrinkle & stretch John Rogers U of Ill. Could be powered by body heatMicrofluidic chips – displace expernsive lab equipment, portabilityIngestables, implantables Proteus 1st FDA approved powered by stomach fluids
  • Paper: George Whitesides Research Group, Dept Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard..1 cents to make using an $800 wax printer, running 24x7 making about 10 Million test a year.Will in five years, the phone disappears into the background and becomes as “significant as dial tone.”
  • More mobile phones than toilets. Worldwide sales of smartphones exceeded those of feature phones in early 2013 Much of the world has limited oversight like FDA China has a goal of 1 million iOS engineers
  • Factors driving the growth include: Increasing demand for lifestyle consumer apps, Greater variety of attachments, Motivated target demographics, Greater chronic disease awareness, Increased smartphone adoption, Persistent financial pressures.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Session 3 Derek Wong, Ph.D., Associate, Burrill & Company •Technologies that are working today & obstacles to innovation Kabir Kasargod, Director, Business •Integration, engagement, and actionable information Deleys Brandman, MD, MPH, •The upcoming decade of redesign: what are the unmet needs and what is needed from mHealth to design healthcare for the coming decade Michael Blum MD, CMIO and Development at Qualcomm Life Texas A&M Innovation Center Associate Vice Chancellor for Informatics Center for Digital Health Innovation, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco Moderator: Jim Bloedau, Information Advantage Group, San Francisco Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 2. There’s A Lot To Know DIY PCMH Clinician Engagement Policy MU Education Reimbursement BAA Sensor Technology Economic Return Personalization Technology Visibility Workflow Patient Virtual Care HRA Participatory Proof Payer Health Navigator MLR HIX HIE Quantified Self Minimize Risk Competitiveness Economic Return Networks BYOD EHR PSO PP S Collaboration ACO NFC BYOID HIPPA HIO LT E Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 3. Enterprise Intensive Electronic Interchange Organization Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 4. EI-EI-O Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 5. Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 6. Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 7. Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 8. One Percenters 1% consumes 21% of healthcare costs. 5% of patients accounted for 50 percent of all health-care expenditures. By contrast the bottom 50% of patients accounted for just 2.8% of spending. Source: Federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 2012 Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 9. Chronic Disease and Care Will Escalate Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 10. Post acute care spending has been shifting to transitional care and home. Slide: Courtesy of Rick Beberman, source: 2011 Medicare Trustees Report Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 11. Shortage of Family Caregivers Family members provide the vast majority of support for people over age 80 in the United States Currently: 7 potential family caregivers available for each frail elderly person. By 2030: 4 caregivers per frail elderly person By 2050: 3 per frail elder by 2050 Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 12. Providers As Developers Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 13. FDA Approved Apps Growth Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 14. Lab On A Chip Printables Multi-Sensor Ingestables Microfluidics Information Advantage Group, San Francisco Optical -Sensing GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 15. “Zero Cost Diagnostics” Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 16. Six Billion Cell Phones Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013
    • 17. Growth and Promise of mHealth • 6X growth in mHealth apps by 2018 as there are today – 15 up to 96 million users (45% CAGR). • 5% to 9% CAGR for consumer medical devices industry revenue reaching $10.6 billion by 2017. Sources: Juniper Research and Consumer Medical Devices Production Yearbook - 2013, IHS, both September 2013 Information Advantage Group, San Francisco GMIC San Francisco 2013