• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
ACO, HIE, Medical Home - Hey Tech Vendor, First Things First by Jim Bloedau of Information Advantage Group
 

ACO, HIE, Medical Home - Hey Tech Vendor, First Things First by Jim Bloedau of Information Advantage Group

on

  • 490 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
490
Views on SlideShare
490
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    ACO, HIE, Medical Home - Hey Tech Vendor, First Things First by Jim Bloedau of Information Advantage Group ACO, HIE, Medical Home - Hey Tech Vendor, First Things First by Jim Bloedau of Information Advantage Group Document Transcript

    • ACO, HIE, Medical Home – Hey Tech Vendors, First Things First By Jim Bloedau of Information Advantage Group In todays post, Brian Dolan over at MobiHealthNews, started to take issue with his contributing editor, Neil Versel, who stirred things up last week with an article, “Silicon Valley often misses the point of healthcare.” All comments fell in line with some obvious frustration and wisdom on Neils part about how Silicon Valley often is "all hat and no cattle" when it comes to clear thinking about healthcare andhow tech can best serve it.With healthcare trying to balance physicianconsolidation, ICD 10, EHR implementations,Meaningful Use, Health Information Exchangesand now Accountable Care Organization/MedicalHome infrastructure on the provider side andMedical Loss Ratio, the 80% rule, employersdropping coverage and health exchanges on thepayer side, wouldnt it be wise to really thinkclearly about how "new and cool" tech has abetter fit to these problems?It is very scary times for both providers and payersand either you are part of a solution to these bigand immediate problems or...part of a solution thatmight be interesting to them after they take care ofthose immediate needs.PS: Thanks Brian at MobiHealthNews.com for givingme a bit of ink.“The most helpful comment came from Jim:Neil, thanks for a historically correct and soberperspective about how hype cycles and technologycan seduce the well intentioned developer. Go easy on them, they are where innovationcomes from and healthcare needs it. Conversely, go hard on them for not seekingexperienced council from history and people who have actually been involved in patientcare and have seen a market cycle or two. Keep pushing the mantra “easy-to-usetechnologies that simplify the lives of the old and sick,” adding, “...and the lives of those
    • who care for them.” Keep hoping for products that help both the sick and well to getmore connected with their health — we can’t depend on someone else doing it for us,which is what most of “old healthcare” is predicated on. Fight the good fight.”