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  • The Age of Spiritual Machines – When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence
    The Singularity Is Near : When Humans Transcend Biology
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
    Taylorism
    F. W. Taylor & Scientific Management
    Mr. Bill's Preface: In October 1995, there was an extended and at times intense discussion in the Quality E-Mail forum on "Scientific Management" and Frederick W. Taylor. At one point Vincenzo Sandrone submitted a post on the subject that the forum moderator deemed appropriate to the discussion, but to long to be posted to the list. What he did was post a notice to the list that the paper was available from Mr. Sandrone via private E-Mail. What follows is that paper posted on this site with permission of the author. The paper will form part of an undergraduate thesis entitled "Total Quality Engineering - A Holistic Approach to Engineering Management" to be submitted in 1996 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a BE in Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Mr. Sandrone's source for quotes is:
    Taylor Frederick W., 1964, Scientific Management - Comprising Shop Management, The principles of Scientific Management and Testimony before the Special House Committee, Harper and Row All the quotes are from 'Scientific Management' this needs to be highlighted as the edition restarted page numbers for each separate section. That is, page numbers are not unique. Please address any comments or critique to Mr. Sandrone.
    Regards, Mr. Bill
    ================================================================== With all the discussion of Taylorism on the list and arguments that both sides did not have the facts, I have decided I may be able to provide some information. I have included a copy of the section on Taylorism from my in process Undergraduate Thesis. I hope that it may help put some facts into the discussion. Looking over the section I have realized that it contained the highest density of direct quotes in my thesis. I feel this was my subconscious way of fighting the, what I considered, misinformation that I had received about Taylorism. Unfortunately I could not find a "definition" of science as applied in Scientific method. However, I would like to make two points: 1) Taylor did not call his original paper "Scientific management" and by the time he published it the name had stuck and his publisher changed the name. (I cannot recall the name of his original paper.) 2) He sort of defines "Scientific Management" by saying what it is not - It is not "Rule of Thumb" when you consider that piece work based on arbitrary quotas ( and heavily biased to the employer) was normal practice. The use of work study/measurement to determine a fair quota was a step forward for both management and the workers. Vincenzo Sandrone QA Engineer GEC Marconi Systems Meadowbank (Sydney), Australia vxsand@gecms.com.au ============================================================== Taylorism Under Taylor's management system, factories are managed through scientific methods rather than by use of the empirical "rule of thumb" so widely prevalent in the days of the late nineteenth century when F. W. Taylor devised his system and published "Scientific Management" in 1911. The main elements of the Scientific Management are [1] : "Time studies Functional or specialized supervision Standardization of tools and implements Standardization of work methods Separate Planning function Management by exception principle The use of "slide-rules and similar time-saving devices" Instruction cards for workmen Task allocation and large bonus for successful performance The use of the 'differential rate' Mnemonic systems for classifying products and implements A routing system A modern costing system etc. etc. " Taylor called these elements "merely the elements or details of the mechanisms of management" He saw them as extensions of the four principles of management.[2] 1. The development of a true science 2. The scientific selection of the workman 3. The scientific education and development of the workman 4. Intimate and friendly cooperation between the management and the men. Taylor warned [3] of the risks managers make in attempting to make change in what would presently be called, the culture, of the organization. He stated the importance of management commitment and the need for gradual implementation and education. He described "the really great problem" involved in the change "consists of the complete revolution in the mental attitude and the habits of all those engaged in the management, as well of the workmen." [4] Taylor taught that there was one and only one method of work that maximized efficiency. "And this one best method and best implementation can only be discovered or developed through scientific study and analysis... This involves the gradual substitution of science for 'rule of thumb' throughout the mechanical arts." [5] "Scientific management requires first, a careful investigation of each of the many modifications of the same implement, developed under rule of thumb; and second, after time and motion study has been made of the speed attainable with each of these implements, that the good points of several of them shall be unified in a single standard implementation, which will enable the workman to work faster and with greater easy than he could before. This one implement, then is the adopted as standard in place of the many different kinds before in use and it remains standard for all workmen to use until superseded by an implement which has been shown, through motion and time study, to be still better." [6] An important barrier to use of scientific management was the limited education of the lower level of supervision and of the work force. A large part of the factory population was composed of recent immigrants who lacked literacy in English. In Taylor's view, supervisors and workers with such low levels of education were not qualified to plan how work should be done. Taylor's solution was to separate planning from execution. "In almost all the mechanic arts the science which underlies each act of each workman is so great and amounts to so much that the workman who is best suited to actually doing the work is incapable of fully understanding this science.." [7] To apply his solution, Taylor created planning departments, staffed them with engineers, and gave them the responsibility to: Develop scientific methods for doing work. Establish goals for productivity. Establish systems of rewards for meeting the goals. Train the personnel in how to use the methods and thereby meet the goals. Perhaps the key idea of Scientific management and the one which has drawn the most criticism was the concept of task allocation. Task allocation [8] is the concept that breaking task into smaller and smaller tasks allows the determination of the optimum solution to the task. "The man in the planning room, whose specialty is planning ahead, invariably finds that the work can be done more economically by subdivision of the labour; each act of each mechanic, for example, should be preceded by various preparatory acts done by other men." [9] The main argument against Taylor is this reductionist approach to work dehumanizes the worker. The allocation of work "specifying not only what is to be done but how it is to done and the exact time allowed for doing it" [10] is seen as leaving no scope for the individual worker to excel or think. This argument is mainly due to later writing rather than Taylor's work as Taylor stated "The task is always so regulated that the man who is well suited to his job will thrive while working at this rate during a long term of years and grow happier and more prosperous, instead of being overworked." [11] Taylor's concept of motivation left something to be desired when compared to later ideas. He methods of motivation started and finished at monetary incentives. While critical of the then prevailing distinction of "us "and "them" between the workforce and employers he tried to find a common ground between the working and managing classes. "Scientific Management has for its foundation the firm conviction that the true interests of the two are one and the same; that prosperity for the employer cannot exist a long term of years unless it is accompanied by prosperity for the employee [sic], and vice versa .." [12] However, this emphasis on monetary rewards was only part of the story. Rivalry between the Bethlehem and Pittsburgh Steel plants led to the offer from Pittsburgh of 4.9 cents per ton against Bethlehem's rate of 3.2 cents per day to the ore loaders. The ore loaders were spoken to individually and their value to the company reinforced and offers to re-hire them at any time were made. The majority of the ore loaders took up the Pittsburgh offers. Most had returned after less than six weeks. [13] The rates at Pittsburgh were determined by gang rates. Peer pressure from the Pittsburgh employees to not work hard meant that the Bethlehem workers actually received less pay than at Bethlehem. Two of the Bethlehem workers requested to be placed in a separate gang, this was rejected by management for the extra work required by management to keep separate record for each worker. Taylor places the blame squarely on management and their inability "to do their share of the work in cooperating with the workmen." [14] Taylor's attitudes towards workers were laden with negative bias "in the majority of cases this man deliberately plans to do as little as he safely can." [15] The methods that Taylor adopted were directed solely towards the uneducated. "When he tells you to pick up a pig and walk, you pick it up and walk, and when he tells you to sit down and rest, you sit down. You do that right through the day. And what's more, no back talk". This type of behaviour towards workers appears barbaric in the extreme to the modern reader, however, Taylor used the example of Schmidt at the Bethlehem Steel Company to test his theories. Taylor admits "This seems rather rough talk. And indeed it would be if applied to an educated mechanic, or even an intelligent labourer." [17] The fact that Taylor took the effort to firstly know the workers name and to cite it is some indication that he empathized with the workforce. This study improved the workrate of Schmidt from 12.5 tons to 47.5 tons per day showing the worth of Scientific Management. The greatest abuse of Scientific Management has come from applying the techniques without the philosophy behind them. It is obvious from Taylor's own observations that the above discussion would be misplaced in other workers. Taylor acknowledged the potential for abuse in his methods. "The knowledge obtained from accurate time study, for example, is a powerful implement, and can be used, in one case to promote harmony between workmen and the management, by gradually educating, training, and leading the workmen into new and better methods of doing the work, or in the other case, it may be used more or less as a club to drive the workmen into doing a larger day's work for approximately the same pay that they received in the past." [17] Scientific Study and standardization were important parts of the Scientific Management. One example, was the study undertaken to determine the optimum shovel load for workers. The figure of 21 pounds [18] was arrived at by the study. To ensure that this shovel load was adhered to, a series of different shovels were purchased for different types of material. Each shovel was designed to ensure that only 21 pounds could be lifted. This stopped the situation where "each shoveller owned his own shovel, that he would frequently go from shoveling ore, with a load of about 30 pounds per shovel, to handling rice coal, with a load on the same shovel of less than 4 pounds. In the one case, he was so overloaded that it was impossible for him to do a full day's work, and in the other case he was so ridiculously under-loaded that it was manifestly impossible to even approximate a day's work." [19] Taylor spent a considerable amount of his books in describing "soldiering" the act of 'loafing' both at an individual level and "systematic soldiering". He described the main reasons that workers were not performing their work at the optimum. Though worded in a patronizing way the essence of the descriptions are still valid. [20] The belief that increased output would lead to less workers. Inefficiencies within the management control system such as poorly designed incentive schemes and hourly pay rates not linked to productivity Poor design of the performance of the work by rule-of-thumb The fear of redundancies within the workforce was a valid argument during the previous style of management. Taylor not only countered this argument by using economic arguments of increased demand due to decreased pricing but put forward the idea of sharing the gains with the workforce. Taylor saw the weaknesses of piece work in the workers reactions to gradual decreases in the piece rate as the worker produced more pieces by working harder and/or smarter. The worker then is determined to have no more reduction in rate by "soldiering". This deception leads to an antagonistic view of management and a general deterioration of the worker/management relationship. Taylor also was a strong advocate of worker development. It follows that the most important object of both the workman and the establishment should be the training and development of each individual in the establishment, so that he can do ( at his fastest pace and with the maximum of efficiency) the highest class of work for which his natural abilities for him." [21] Taylor's ideas on management and workers speaks of justice for both parties. "It (the public) will no longer tolerate the type of employer who has his eyes only on dividends alone, who refuses to do his share of the work and who merely cracks the whip over the heads of his workmen and attempts to drive them harder work for low pay. No more will it tolerate tyranny on the part of labour which demands one increase after another in pay and shorter hours while at the same time it becomes less instead of more efficient."[22] Taylor's system was widely adopted in the United States and the world. Although the Taylor system originated in the factory production departments, the concept of separating planning from execution was universal in nature and, hence, had potential application to other areas: production support services offices operations service industries. Management's new responsibilities were extended to include: [23] Replacing the old rule-of-thumb with scientific management Scientifically select and train, teach and develop the workman "Heartily cooperate with the men so as to insure[sic] all the work being done in accordance with the principles of the science which has been developed" Take over the work for which they are "better fitted" than the workmen. Relationship between Taylorism and TQM Taylor's more general summary of the principles of Scientific Management are better suited for inclusion into the TQM methodology, than the narrow definitions. "It is no single element , but rather the this whole combination, that constitutes Scientific Management, which may be summarized as: Science, not rule of thumb Harmony, not discord Cooperation, not individualism Maximum output in place of restricted output The development of each man to his greatest efficiency and prosperity" [24] Much has happened, since Taylor developed his method of Scientific Management, to make obsolete the premises on which he based his concepts: Lack of education is no longer reason enough to separate the planning function The balance of power between managers and the work force has changed. Where in Taylor's time it was heavily weighted against the workers. Unionism (or the threat of it) has profoundly changed that balance. Changes in the climate of social thinking. Revolts against the "dehumanizing" of work. A basic tenet of Scientific management was that employees were not highly educated and thus were unable to perform any but the simplest tasks. Modern thought is that all employees have intimate knowledge of job conditions and are therefore able to make useful contributions. Rather than dehumanizing the work and breaking the work down into smaller and smaller units to maximize efficiency without giving thought to the job satisfaction of the working. Encouragement of work based teams in which all workers may contribute. Such contributions increase worker morale, provide a sense of ownership, and improve management-worker relations generally. References 1. Scientific Management, pg 129-130 2. Scientific Management, pg 130 3. Scientific Management, pg 131 4. Scientific Management, pg 131 5. Scientific Management, pg 25 6. Scientific Management, pg 119 7. Scientific Management, pp 25-25 8. Scientific Management, pg 39 9. Scientific Management, pg 38 10. Scientific Management, pg 39 11. Scientific Management, pg 39 12. Scientific Management, pg 10 13. Scientific Management, pg 75 14. Scientific Management, pg 77 15. Scientific Management, pg 13 16. Scientific Management, pg 46 17. Scientific Management, pp 133-134 18. Scientific Management, pg 66 19. Scientific Management, pg 67 20. Scientific Management, pg 23 21. Scientific Management, pg 12 22. Scientific Management, pg 139 23. Scientific Management, pg 36 24. Scientific Management, pg 140 Vincenzo Sandrone QA Engineer GEC Marconi Systems Meadowbank (Sydney), Australia vxsand@gecms.com.au An [email_address] Internet publication. December 10, 1995
  • “Although we often hear about the reasons kids should not play video games, there is, indeed, a positive correlation between video gaming and increased hand-eye coordination, reaction time, spatial visualization, neuro-psychological tests, visual attentiveness and mental rotation,” says Dr. Rosser. “Those are all skills that are required to be a successful surgeon.”A study conducted at Beth Israel Medical Center by Dr. Rosser, found a significant correlation between video game experience and proficiency at laparoscopic surgery. According to the study, surgeons who currently play or previously played video games had a 37 percent reduction in errors and accomplish laparoscopic surgical tasks 27 percent quicker. “The studies confirm what some physicians have long suspected – video games can be natural teachers,” says Dr. Mogel. “However, this probably has been unintended by the game designers.”
  • “Although we often hear about the reasons kids should not play video games, there is, indeed, a positive correlation between video gaming and increased hand-eye coordination, reaction time, spatial visualization, neuro-psychological tests, visual attentiveness and mental rotation,” says Dr. Rosser. “Those are all skills that are required to be a successful surgeon.”A study conducted at Beth Israel Medical Center by Dr. Rosser, found a significant correlation between video game experience and proficiency at laparoscopic surgery. According to the study, surgeons who currently play or previously played video games had a 37 percent reduction in errors and accomplish laparoscopic surgical tasks 27 percent quicker. “The studies confirm what some physicians have long suspected – video games can be natural teachers,” says Dr. Mogel. “However, this probably has been unintended by the game designers.”
  • The careers are ordered by priority.
    Design-related fields are at the top fo the chart for both females and males.
    Males in middle school are described in the literature as being more likely to have interests that could be labeled “fantasy careers’ or “glamour careers.”
  • Free video game teaches kids about world hungerBY JINNY GUDMUNDSEN
    GANNETT NEWS SERVICE
    Live 8, the global concerts earlier this month to fight poverty in Africa, greatly increased awareness of world hunger. But most kids don't understand how international aid organizations work to help starving people.
    That's where a video game can help. "Food Force" gives kids between the ages of 8 and 13 a better understanding of how relief organizations operate.
    Produced by the United Nations' World Food Programme, "Food Force" is a free Internet download at www.food-force.com.
    Kids join a team of emergency aid workers to save the fictitious island of Sheylan from starvation caused by drought and civil war.
    The team goes on six missions to help save the island. Each mission starts with a briefing by one of the emergency aid characters. Kids then play a hands-on game to score enough points to complete the mission. For example, in the first mission, kids pilot a helicopter by using the computer mouse. Time is limited, and youngsters earn points by locating refugees. After piloting, the Food Force character returns to evaluate the kids' performance and uses an accompanying video that shows the program in action to make the whole process seem realistic.
    The additional missions cleverly use games to demonstrate how emergency aid teams acquire food, make food packs, deliver food and establish long-term food supplies.
    When kids complete all six missions, they can upload their cumulative score to an international database found on the Food Force Web site. The Web site also provides information about how kids can help fight hunger, and it allows them to explore more about the World Food Programme. Teachers also will find lesson plans that incorporate the game.
    The program effectively reaches 'tweens and teens with 3-D graphics and characters that resemble those in popular commercial titles, helping bring closer to home the problems of world hunger, which are most often thousands of miles away.
    The game is best for ages 8 to 13. It scores a perfect five stars.
    For more information, see www.food-force.com, United Nations' World Food Programme, offering free downloadable program for Windows and Macintosh.
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • As a result, Whyville has become one of the most used educational sites on the Internet
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • The average Whyville user is 13 1/2 and 68% are girls
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Age of Science Nonfiction Jim Brazell – jim@ventureRAMP.com
    • 2. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense ‘intuitive linear’ view. So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century -- it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today's rate)… because we're doubling the rate of progress every decade, we'll see a century of progress--at today's rate--in only 25 calendar years.” Kurzweil, KurzweilAI.net, March 7, 2001.
    • 3. The Age of Science Nonfiction
    • 4. Would you like a more philosophical definition?
    • 5. What did McLuhan call the age in which we live?.
    • 6. ?
    • 7. Cybernetics is the discipline that studies and creates communication and control systems in living organisms and in the machines built by humans. Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder).
    • 8. GlucoboyThe video game that runs on blood. The Age of Automatic Control Systems
    • 9. Industrial Age Scientific Management, Training, Planning and Task Allocation F.W. Taylor, 1911, Principles of Scientific Management Cybernetic Age Cybernetics "the art of assuring efficiency of action" 1958 by Louis Couffignal. Communication and control systems embedded in living organisms and machines through manipulation of physical, chemical, biological and neurological objects, processes, systems and environments. World Shift Notion of Information Age
    • 10. What are the workforce implicaitons?
    • 11. Jobs Context
    • 12. Navy Job Mergers
    • 13. Job Mergers – Wind Turbine Lineman Oil Field Farm Mechanic Wind Turbine Tech Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 14. Wind Turbine Tech Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Instrumentation Hydraulic Systems Electronics Systems Mechanical Systems Airfoils & Composites Data Communications Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 15. Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): Business Week: 10.11.2004 100 million jobs are going to be created in a lot of these cross-disciplinary fields Council on Competitiveness: National Innovation Initiative
    • 16. What are the education implications?
    • 17. Texas Cluster Initiative - Workforce 60% of the jobs in the Texas biotechnology cluster require only an associates degree or certificate. The reality is many of the Texas Cluster’s high-tech jobs are split between requirements for community and technical college degrees and 4-year degrees. Skilled technical jobs are attainable and critically needed by industry. Dr. Mae Jemison, Chair, Biotechnology Cluster
    • 18. Finnish people have a high standard of education. All children receive compulsory basic education between the ages of 7 and 16. Education beyond the age of 16 is voluntary, taking the form of either a 3 to 4 year course in upper secondary school or 2 to 5 years at a vocational school. Finnish higher education consists of two sectors: universities and polytechnics. There are 20 universities and 29 polytechnics in the country. Nearly 60 per cent of the population have completed post- primary education and 13 per cent have a university degree or comparable qualification. http://virtual.finland.fi/netcomm/news/showarticle.asp?intNWSAID=27443#edu
    • 19. Program Merger: Mechatronics Electricity Hydraulics Pneumatics Programmable Logic Controllers Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Sensors Robotics Microcontrollers Motors Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 20. Program Merger: Fuel Cell Mobile – Power for Transportation Stationary – Commercial and Residential Power Portable – Miniature Batteries Combined - Renewable Energy Biomass Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 21. Program Merger: Wind Energy Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Instrumentation Hydraulic Systems Electronics Systems Mechanical Systems Airfoils & Composites Data Communications Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 22. Program Merger: Bio-Instrumentation Drug development Healthcare monitoring Treatment modalities Environmental contamination control Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsBiotechnology Materials science Bioterrorism Agriculture Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 23. Program Merger: Home Technology Information Technology Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Integrated home control Computer/home network Communications Lighting and energy management Security Health Safety Entertainment Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 24. Program Merger: Digital Forensics Law Enforcement Corporate Sector Data Recovery Consulting Private Investigations Information Technology Electronics Criminal Justice Security Technology Computer Maintenance Computer Systems Admin Computer Forensics Rules of Evidence Expert Interpretation Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 25. Transdisciplinarity
    • 26. Transdisciplinarity • Creating new knowledge, processes and systems. • Structurally converging knowledge, processes and systems. • Integrating learning, working and problem solving. • Engaging real world needs and problems.
    • 27. Source: Brazell, IC2 Institute, 2004 Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein- Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon University, University of Frankfurt, Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. www.andrew.cmu.edu/~ycai/biogame.pdf BIOSIM 1.0
    • 28. Chemistry Engineering BiologyPhysics Educational Convergence Informatics
    • 29. Business Law Fine Arts Liberal Arts Educational Convergence Informatics
    • 30. Where can we find transdisciplinary actors today?
    • 31. Video Gamers
    • 32. Player Incr. hand-eye coord reaction time spatial visualization neuro-psych. tests visual attentiveness and mental rotation http://www.wehealnewyork.org/BI%20Surgeon%20teams%20up%20with%20Hollywood.htm James “Butch” Rosser, M.D., Chief of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Director of the Advanced Medical Technology Institute (AMTI) Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan According to Rosser’s study, surgeons who currently play or previously played video games had a 37% reduction in errors and accomplish laparoscopic surgical tasks 27% quicker.
    • 33. More specifically, video game builders.
    • 34. US Nano Soldier FCS 2020 defenselink.mil/news/Jul2004/n07272004_2004072705.html Game Builder – Nano Soldier
    • 35. Neuro Evolved Robotic Operatives Agents cope with changing environments and situations, optimize resource management, and form adaptive tactical solutions in real time. Stanley, Bryant, Perry, Patterson, Gold, Thibault, Miikkulainen IC2 Institute: NERO Game Builder – AI for Sensors
    • 36. And, maybe game operators.
    • 37. Sys Admin
    • 38. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmlhttp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/electrosonic/electrosonic1.html  BACK FLIP C4 Operations Centers Air Land Sea Space Cyber
    • 39. What the %^&* are they doing over there?
    • 40. 4th World Millennials Low Socio-Economic Status Goldberg’s Crew, Houston Community College
    • 41. This study was funded by the State Farm Companies Foundation and by Dr. George Kozmetsky (1917-2003), founder of the IC² Institute. The study was designed and analyzed, and the report was written by a team at The University of Texas at Austin: Aliza Gold, Senior Producer and Researcher at the Digital Media Collaboratory, part of the IC² Institute Emily Durden, PhD candidate in Sociology Marjorie L. Kase, M.A. in Communication Shane Alluah, PhD candidate in Educational Psychology Ana Boa-Ventura, PhD candidate in Communication The research team would like to thank the participating schools and their administrators: Elgin Middle School Goodnight Middle school Miller Junior High Fleming Middle School
    • 42. Low SES: More TV and More Video Games TV Games A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming
    • 43. Females Males Designer/Decorator Professional athlete Doctor Video Game Designer Cosmetologist Business Owner Lawyer Engineer Teacher Lawyer Business Owner Military Service Musician/Singer Auto Mechanic Cook/Chef Computer Programmer A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming
    • 44. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 High school or less Community college/technical College degree or beyond How Much Education do You Want? White African American Latino Other How much education? A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming 4th World
    • 45. 5th World Millennials Not Low Socio-Economic Status Ninja’s Crew, GameCamp, 2005
    • 46. Female, 4, 8% Male, 46, 92% Average Age Respondent 15 Avg. Age Start Playing Games 5 Avg. Hours of Play Per Week 24 % Mod’ers 34% Average Hours Mod'ing Per Wk. 5 Average Age Start Mod'ing 12 50 Game Camp Respondents to Date
    • 47. Why do you modify games? 9 8 14 3 9 8 8 9 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Playing Yes Playing No Learning Yes Learning No Show Yes Show No Better Yes Better No
    • 48. 22 48 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Graduate HS Graduate CC or TC Graduate University Plans for education Computer Science 20 Video Game Design 9 Design/Art 8 Write in to survey 5th World
    • 49. So, what the %^&* are they doing over there?
    • 50. Math Engineering TechScience What are they learning? ?
    • 51. Math Engineering TechScience ARTS What are they learning?
    • 52. Math Engineering TechScience TEAMS What are they learning?
    • 53. REMIXING – Constructive media remixing TEAMS – Transdisciplinary communities of practice. SWARMING – Network socialization and learning (communal). GROUP – Global Generation? 1980 Emergence of the 5th World 198219641946 Boomers Generation X Millennials 46-64 65-79 82-Present 5th World 4th World = Digital Divide
    • 54. What is the average age of all video gamers in US?
    • 55. Entertainment Software Association (ESA), 2005 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry, May 18, 2005.
    • 56. What percent female and male? Are shooters the most popular?
    • 57. 55% and 43% of all games Entertainment Software Association (ESA), 2005 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry, May 18, 2005.
    • 58. How can we harness and direct the energy and self- motivated learning associated with building games to create the workforce of the future-- today?
    • 59. San Antonio 2110
    • 60. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
    • 61. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
    • 62. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    • 63. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School GameBOY
    • 64. Game Field http://robotics.nasa.gov/botball/2004/BBNat-04/T-Best/CrystalSprings_prep124.JPG
    • 65. Through mixing realities, research is expanding the potential of embedded training in the field and in battle labs to provide integrated training anytime, anywhere. Advancements are being transferred across industries from business prototypes to hospitality training. Integrated research in tracking, registration, rendering, display, and scenario delivery are expanding the possibilities of CONSTRUCTIVE simulation as well as after action review, and command and control visualizations.
    • 66. FREE if you have a team of 8 middle or high school girls…
    • 67. What is the technical academic core?
    • 68. Program Merger: Mechatronics Electricity Hydraulics Pneumatics Programmable Logic Controllers Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Sensors Robotics Microcontrollers Motors Bettersworth and Brazell, TSTC, Forthcoming 2007
    • 69. What are we teaching?
    • 70. Liberal Arts Engineering Fine ArtsPhysics Educational Convergence Informatics
    • 71. http://images.autodesk.com/emea_design_center/images/4423712_FIRST-Team-342-image-1-gr.jpg 2004, US FIRST Robotics Design Winner Instructor, Kalameja, Trident Technical College, Charleston, SC, USA
    • 72. Do we have to make education fun for students to want to learn?
    • 73. Do we have to make education fun for students to want to learn? No, but it’s a lot more fun if it’s fun…
    • 74. What learning tools are we evaluating?
    • 75. FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE
    • 76. alice.org
    • 77. Delta3d.org
    • 78. squeakland.org
    • 79. food-force.com Produced by the United Nations' World Food Programme, Kids join a team of emergency aid workers to save the fictitious island of Sheylan from starvation caused by drought and civil war. The team goes on six missions to help save the island. The additional missions cleverly use games to demonstrate how emergency aid teams acquire food, make food packs, deliver food and establish long-term food supplies.
    • 80. Food-force.com
    • 81. ©numedeon,inc.2004
    • 82. ©numedeon,inc.2004 SPACE STATION
    • 83. © numedeon, inc. 2004
    • 84. Whyville City Hall ©numedeon,inc.2004 Whyville Senators OrEoBaBy Sooner
    • 85. ©numedeon,inc.2004 Percent users by age and gender 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 under 13 13-18 over 18 Girls Boys
    • 86. Feb. 14- March 13, 2002 3,000 BBS postings
    • 87. Whyville.net
    • 88. Are there any games for teachers?
    • 89. Whyville.net
    • 90. FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE
    • 91. Virtual U models the attitudes and behaviors of the academic community in five major areas of higher education anagement: • Spending and income decisions such as operating budget, new hires, incoming donations, and management of the endowment; • Faculty, course, and student scheduling issues; • Admissions standards, university prestige, and student enrollment; • Student housing, classrooms, and all other facilities; and • Performance indicators. Enlight Software, the Jackson Hole Higher Education Group, and the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania (data), with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Spencer Foundation. www.virtual-u.org
    • 92. Virtual-u.org
    • 93. Where are we going with spaceTEAMS?
    • 94. “spaceTEAMS can return San Antonio to the path of human development and space exploration making it in the realm of possibility that the first person to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.” --General Robert F. McDermott and Dr. Francis “Duke” Kane
    • 95. Workforce Education Video Games Millennials
    • 96. Nanotechnology Fuel Cells Digital Games Homeland Security ADM, Hybrid, MEMS, Computer Forensics Wireless: M2M Emerging Technology Studies
    • 97. Emerging Technology Briefs • Artificial Intelligence • Crime Scene Technician • Home Technology Integration • Liquefied Natural Gas • Mechatronics • Nuclear Power Technician • Photovoltaic Technician • Polysomnography • Retinal Angiographer • Wind Turbines
    • 98. www.forecasting.system.tstc.edu • Download complete emerging technology studies for free • Register with the site for future publications • Participate in emerging technology topic surveys
    • 99. The Age of Science Nonfiction Jim Brazell – jim@ventureRAMP.com

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