The Future is Here
The Future is Here
“In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every
job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation
technicians...
Jobs Context
http://www.afmc.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/060307-F-2383G-006.JPG
“We’ve had a huge turn over. Most of the guys wh...
“Within ten years
more than 50% of
our employees will
be over 55.”
Edward C. Trump
Plant Manager
Entergy
“90 percent of our expertise is 40 and
“We are losing our capacity to make tools.”
–Jimmy Dye, Pres., R.E. Dye,
TSTC West TX
20 teenagers in 9th
grade
• 6 will not graduate HS
• 6 will go directly to work
• 8 will go to college
• 4 will dropout of...
From
To
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
High School
Dropouts
High School
Graduates
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
High School
Graduates
College
Graduates
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Low STEM
Performance
High STEM
Performance
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
The Future is Here!
Discussion
From
To
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
The Future is Here
Science and Technology
Workforce
Education
www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html
“An analysis of the
history of technology
shows that
technological chang...
If you have an automobile made in the past 5 years, you are
driving a vehicle with more computing power than was used
to p...
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
PRIUS+ team: we built the first PRIUS+ conversion Sept 11-22, 2004, starting with a low-cost
lead-acid battery pack. Pictu...
http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/
Running Shoe?
http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1-
wp_02_1280_1024.jpg
http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/a...
http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp
Berkeley Motes/berkeley.i...
http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf
intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp
/berkeley.intel-research...
v
v
Think beyond
traditional notion of
robotics…
Mechatronics
Functional
integration of
mechanical,
electronic,
computer and
control systems.
Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nu...
MIT Tech Review, 2005
Sensors
Physical
Chemical
Biological
http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16
Act...
MIT Technology Review,
January, 2005
http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif
http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif
Lab-in-a-Pill
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_capsule_endoscopy
Capsule Endoscope
Source: The Guardian
Date: 2 May 2002
State University of New York (Suny)
https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg
Bio Mechatronics
Nanoprobe, with a tip 1,000 times finer
than a human hair, penetrating a cell.
The probe can enter, perform a
measurement ...
http://web.mit.edu/nanoengineering/research/microfab.shtml
Micro-Mechatronics
An artificial red cell – the respirocyte [41].
Designer Robert A. Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest
Bishop. http://www.imminst.org...
Computers
Mechatronics
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Mechatronics
Functional
integration of
mechanical,
electronic,
computer and
control systems.
Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nu...
Mechatronics-related Industries
• Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment
• Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical
• Telec...
SET Convergence
DNA Chip
IT Revolution
SET
Convergence
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Adapted from Charles Ostman
Senior Fellow
Institute for Global Futures
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
Adapted from Charles Ostman
Senior Fellow
Institute for Global Futures
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
S&T Convergence
Technical applications of biological molecules
including protein-based materials, DNA-based
materials, biomineralization, ...
NanoBionic Actuators
Tethered bacterium
Swimming bacterium
Swimming speed ~ 20-30 µm
Protons flux/motor ~ 1200 proton/rev
...
Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): Business Week: 10.11.2004
100 million jobs are going to
be created in a lot of these
cross-di...
The Future is Here!
Discussion
From
To
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
What are the implications of computers
and robotic interfaces to the human
body and brain?
By routing signals from helmet-mounted
cameras, sonar and other equipment through the
tongue to the brain, they hope to gi...
Critical Analysis
http://heaven4d.babu.com/CG/
Source: DOD C2 Research Program, 2004
Evolution of the division of labor
between Humans and Machines:
Emergence of Human M...
The Future is Here
Science and Technology
Workforce
Education
“Over the next ten years, 26 of
the top 30 fastest growing jobs
will require some post-
secondary education or
training......
“Over the next ten years, 26 of
the top 30 fastest growing jobs
will require some post-
secondary education or
training......
Source: Competition in a global economy.
The Career Cluster Solution. Debra Mills,
CORD
White
Collar
20%
Blue Collar
80%
1...
GM05-018 L3IS/DFOISR-60
“Our requirement for skilled labor is up while our
requirement for unskilled labor is down.”
--Lan...
Unskilled
Workforce
Skilled
Workforce
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
The number of jobs
requiring technical
training is growing at
five times the rate of
other occupations.
Innovate America, ...
Wind Turbine Tech
11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
“In most industries you
have electricians,
mechanics and IT, in
wind...
“Turbine Techs earn $28-
$40K a year… Many
techs earning $40K -
$80K a year with OT.”
– Bryan Gregory, Jr.
11.1.2006, TSTC...
“….we had to upgrade our basic
mechanic skills to include
programmable logic controllers and
electrical systems.”
--Dr. Ro...
Meterology Technician
$44,000-to-$56,000
Production Set-up Technician
$30,000-to-$50,000
Mechanics
$36,000-to-$56,000
Alle...
Breckenridge, Texas
TSTC Emerging Technologies Interview
Blood Chemistry
Analyzer
“We need
people who
have integrated
skills related to
mechanical,
electronic,
hydraulics and
pneumatics.”
--Bill Biffinger...
“Starting wages
for Engineering
Tech, IT Tech
and Industrial
Technology
range from $28K
to $32K.”
-- Bill Biffinger, HR,
S...
System and Network Technician
$30,000-to-$50,000
“You have to be able to trouble shoot in a
different way. In the mechanic...
“It used to be the
sledgehammer
mechanic. These days,
the technology has
advanced so much that
our most important tool
is ...
Avionic Tech
$36,000-to-$65,000
Avionics Mechanics
$28,000-to-$55,000
Lab Technician
$25,000-to-$40,000
ACTI
4/2007, TSTC ...
Free Flight Repair Technicians
$28,000-to-$40,000+
4/2007, TSTC Waco
Entry-Level R&D Tech
$40,000-to-$50,000
4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
“We are looking for
someone who can look at
the mechanical, the
electrical and the control
and understand these
systems. W...
“In this plant, in the
next three years we
will need nine
Instrumentation and
Numerical Control
(INC) technicians.”
Edward...
Specialized
KSA
Systems
KSA
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Mechatronics
Functional
integration of
mechanical,
electronic,
computer and
control systems.
Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nu...
[Navy Mechatronic Job Tasks]
JOB
MERGERS
STEM jobs are increasingly
transdisciplinary--integrating
knowledge, skills and
occupations from traditionally
separate fi...
The Future is Here!
Discussion
STEM jobs are increasingly
transdisciplinary--integrating
knowledge, skills and
occupations from traditionally
separate fi...
The Future is Here
Science and Technology
Workforce
Education
spaceTEAMS
v1.0
Elementary
spaceTEAMS
Source: Andrew Schuetze, EISD
San Antonio,TX
Middle School
Source: Botball.org
spaceTEAMS
San Antonio,TX
US First-EISD
San Antonio,TX
High School Source: Andrew Schuetze, EISD
Mechatronics
Functional
integration of
mechanical,
electronic,
computer and
control systems.
Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nu...
Mechatronics-related Industries
• Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment
• Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical
• Telec...
Computers
Mechatronics
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Willard R. Daggett, Ed.D.,
President of the International
Center for Leadership in Education
Academics
ARTSCTE
America’s T...
Lower Rio Grande Valley
o College transition rates, all
students: 56.7%
o College transition rates,
Tech Prep (2005 cohort...
STEM
TEAMS
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
High School
Dropouts
High School
Graduates
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Low STEM
Performance
High STEM
Performance
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
The
Experience
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Specialized
KSA
Systems
KSA
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Program
Elements
Gameboy BRAIN
Vision System
Lego Actuators and
Building Blocks
Source: Charmedlabs.com
Population: 1.4MM Growth: 1200/day
Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes
EA online games 9 minutes
AOL Entertainment 10 minutes
...
©numedeon,inc.2004
©numedeon,inc.2004
SPACE STATION
spaceTEAMS
v2.0
Jim Brazell
Consulting Analyst,
IC2
Institute, UT
Austin and Texas
State Technical
College System
Qwerk: The Next Gen Robot Platform
• ARM9 Processor
• 32 Mbytes SDRAM, 16 Mbytes flash
• Spartan 3E FPGA
• 2 USB 2.0 ports...
www.charmedlabs.com
STEMATICS – Curriculum
Metrology – Measurement of nano, meso, micro and macro-scale systems.
Materials – Electronic, therm...
STEMATICS – Method
©numedeon,inc.2004
Adapted from Charles Ostman
Senior Fellow
Institute for Global Futures
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
S&T Convergence
IT Revolution
SET
Convergence
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
spaceTEAMS
v3.0
Online network, simulation games and instrumentation trainers (?)
Improved Target Acquisition System Trainer
STEMATICS
The Future is Here
Science and Technology
Workforce
Education
“In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every
job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation
technicians...
Commercialization Joint R&D
Technopolis and Culture of Innovation
What is missing?
Commercialization Joint R&D K-12 Pipeline
Technopolis and Culture of Innovation
Commercialization
Joint R&D
What shifts will we have to
make in order to increase
options for students?
Commercialization
...
DaVinci Minds
http://www.philisoft.com/personal/misc/davinci/davinci-1600x1200.jpg
spaceTEAMS
is the human
platform for
mars and
beyond…
Jim Brazell
Consulting Analyst,
IC2
Institute, UT
Austin and Texas
State Technical
College System
jim@ventureramp.com
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long
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  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Anti depressant, AIDS and Parkinsons dry mouth effects speech and sleepDentist and engineer
  • Lab-in-a-Pill – Revolutionising Bowel Cancer Screening
    Sector: Medical Devices
    Technology
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the western world, colorectal cancer is now the third most frequent cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. In the US nearly 150,000 new cases are being diagnosed each year and more than 56,000 people died from the disease in 2002. In the UK, where a national screening campaign will be implemented across the 20m population over 50, around 15,000 people die from the disease each year.
    Current screening techniques are notoriously inaccurate, leading to many false positives which saturate resources available for follow-up diagnosis. But scientists at Glasgow University have pioneered a new sensor technology, Lab-in-a-Pill, that could have major impact on the cost and effectiveness of bowel cancer treatment.
    At the core of Lab-in-a-Pill is a miniaturised sensor, processing and communications module all enclosed in a chemical-resistant capsule which currently measures around 3cm x 1cm in prototype form.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill module, which would be sent to all individuals being screened, incorporates a multi-sensor array which includes a blood test. The pill is able to detect blood as it travels through the bowel, transmitting the real time measurements to a small external module worn under a patch attached to the body.
    After one, or more pills have been swallowed over the required screening period, the patch is returned for the measured data to be assessed at the screening centre. So the pills themselves do not have to be recovered making the screening process much more acceptable. And because it measures the location of bleeding Lab-in-a-Pill can identify, more effectively, those individuals who are most at risk.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill concept, currently undergoing in-vitro trials, overcomes the critical difficulties with the current screening scheme which is based on individuals collecting stool samples. Major benefits include:
    • improved compliance and screening response rate with elimination of sample collection
    • reduced false positives and improved sensitivity through measurement at the source of bleeding
    So Lab-in-a-Pill reduces the pressure on valuable national resources by eliminating the need for central screening laboratories and ensuring only at-risk patients are referred for colonoscopy.
    IP Status
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The intellectual property associated with this technology belongs to the University of Glasgow.
    The University of Glasgow is always keen to hear from potential collaborative partners and welcomes interest from genuine parties. If you would like further information about this technology or this area of research please complete the following form and we will get back to you via telephone or email within two working days.
    Enquiry Form
    http://www.innovativelicences.com/index.cfm/page/licensesandtechnologies/technologyid/48
  • http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.htm
    What is a cochlear implant?
    Credit: NIH Medical ArtsEar with Cochlear implant. View larger image.A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. The implant consists of an external portion that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin (see figure). An implant has the following parts:
    A microphone, which picks up sound from the environment.
    A speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone.
    A transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses.
    An electrode array, which is a group of electrodes that collects the impulses from the stimulator and sends them to different regions of the auditory nerve.
    An implant does not restore normal hearing. Instead, it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech.
    Top
    How does a cochlear implant work?
    A cochlear implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sounds so they may be detected by damaged ears. Cochlear implants bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. However, it allows many people to recognize warning signals, understand other sounds in the environment, and enjoy a conversation in person or by telephone.
    Top
    Who gets cochlear implants?
    Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Children and adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing can be fitted for cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 2005 data, nearly 100,000 people worldwide have received implants. In the United States, roughly 22,000 adults and nearly 15,000 children have received them.
    Adults who have lost all or most of their hearing later in life often can benefit from cochlear implants. They often can associate the sounds made through an implant with sounds they remember. This may help them to understand speech without visual cues or systems such as lipreading or sign language.
    Cochlear implants, coupled with intensive postimplantation therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, developmental, and social skills. Most children who receive implants are between two and six years old. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the FDA lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of cochlear implant.
    Top
    How does someone receive a cochlear implant?
    Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy to learn or relearn the sense of hearing. Not everyone performs at the same level with this device. The decision to receive an implant should involve discussions with medical specialists, including an experienced cochlear-implant surgeon. The process can be expensive. For example, a person’s health insurance may cover the expense, but not always. Some individuals may choose not to have a cochlear implant for a variety of personal reasons. Surgical implantations are almost always safe, although complications are a risk factor, just as with any kind of surgery. An additional consideration is learning to interpret the sounds created by an implant. This process takes time and practice. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists are frequently involved in this learning process. Prior to implantation, all of these factors need to be considered.
    Top
    What does the future hold for cochlear implants?
    With advancements in technology and continued follow-up studies with people who already have received implants, researchers are evaluating how cochlear implants might be used for other types of hearing loss.
    NIDCD is supporting research to improve upon the benefits provided by cochlear implants. It may be possible to use a shortened electrode array, inserted into a portion of the cochlea, for individuals whose hearing loss is limited to the higher frequencies. Other studies are exploring ways to make a cochlear implant convey the sounds of speech more clearly. Researchers also are looking at the potential benefits of pairing a cochlear implant in one ear with either another cochlear implant or a hearing aid in the other ear.
  • ORNL nanoprobe creates world of new possibilities
         ORNL researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh expects big things from the nanoprobe. OAK RIDGE, Tenn., July 14, 2004 — A technology with proven environmental, forensics and medical applications has received a shot in the arm because of an invention by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    ORNL's nanoprobe, which is based on a light scattering technique, can detect and analyze chemicals, explosives, drugs and more at a theoretical single-molecule level. This capability makes it far more selective and accurate than conventional competing technologies.
    The probe is an optical fiber tapered to a tip measuring 100 nanometers with an extremely thin coating of nanoparticles of silver, which induces the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Normally, when a sample is illuminated by a laser beam, there is a small reflection of light, known as Raman scattering. The light shows vibration energies, which are unique to each compound, and that information allows scientists to identify the substance.
    With the SERS nanoprobe, the laser light creates rapid oscillations of the electrons in the silver nanoparticles, which produce an enormous electromagnetic field that contributes to increase the Raman scattering signal. The ORNL nanoprobe works with any surface to induce the SERS effect.
    "The significance of this work is that we are now able to perform direct analysis of samples -- even dry samples -- with no preparation of the surface," said ORNL's Tuan Vo-Dinh, who leads a team that developed the nanoprobe. "Also, the small scale of the nanoprobe demonstrates the potential for detection in nanoscale environments, such as at the intracellular level."
    Ordinarily, surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of samples on a surface requires modification or treatment of the sample. This may consist of physically removing the sample and diluting it in a liquid containing silver nanoparticles; however, this practice is unnecessary with the ORNL nanoprobe.
    Vo-Dinh and Life Sciences Division colleagues David Stokes and Zhenhuan Chi experimented with nanoprobes made of several materials of varying thickness. They settled on silver-island films because they are easier to reproduce than silver-coated particles and they form only a thin coating, which helps maintain the nanoscale diameter of the tapered tip.
    The development of the SERS nanoprobe could lead to increasing interest in SERS as an ultra-sensitive detection tool, allowing direct analysis of samples for a wide variety of applications, Vo-Dinh said. These applications range from environmental monitoring to intracellular sensing and medical diagnostics.
    ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy. Funding for the project was provided by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.
    ORNL's nanobiosensor technology gives new access to living cell’s molecular processes
    OAK RIDGE, April 27, 2004 -- Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a nanoscale technology for investigating biomolecular processes in single living cells. The new technology enables researchers to monitor and study cellular signaling networks, including the first observation of programmed cell death in a single live cell. The "nanobiosensor" allows scientists to physically probe inside a living cell without destroying it. As scientists adopt a systems approach to studying biomolecular processes, the nanobiosensor provides a valuable tool for intracellular studies that have applications ranging from medicine to national security to energy production.
    ORNL Corporate Fellow and Life Sciences Division researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh leads a team of researchers who are developing the nanoscale technology. "This research illustrates the integrated 'nano-bio-info' approach to investigating and understanding these complex cell systems," Vo-Dinh said. "There is a need to explore uncharted territory inside a live cell and analyze the molecular processes. This minimally invasive nanotechnology opens the door to explore the inner world of single cells".
    ORNL's work was most recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and has appeared in a feature article of the journal Nature. Members of Vo-Dinh's research team include postdoctoral researchers Paul M. Kasili, Joon Myong Song and research staff biochemist Guy Griffin.
    The group's nanobiosensor is a tiny fiber-optic probe that has been drawn to a tip of only 40 nanometers (nm) across--a billionth of a meter and 1,000 times smaller than a human hair. The probe is small enough to be inserted into a cell.
    Immobilized at the nanotip is a bioreceptor molecule, such as an antibody, DNA or enzyme that can bind to target molecules of interest inside the cell. Video microscopy experiments reveal the minimally invasive nature of the nanoprobe in that it can be inserted into a cell and withdrawn without destroying it.
    Because the 40-nm diameter of the fiber-optic probe is much narrower than the 400-nm wavelength of light, only target molecules bound to the bioreceptors at the tip are exposed to and excited by the evanescent field of a laser signal.
    "We detect only the molecules that we target, without all the other background 'noise' from the myriad other species inside the cell. Only nanoscale fiber-optics technology can provide this capability," said Vo-Dinh.
    ORNL's technology gives molecular biologists an important systems biology approach of studying complex systems through the nano-bio-info route. Conventional analytical methods--electron microscopy or introducing dyes, for example--have the disadvantage of being lethal to the cell.
    "The information obtained from conventional measurements is an average of thousands or millions of cells," said Vo-Dinh. "When you destroy cells to study them, you can't obtain the dynamic information from the whole live cell system. You get only pieces of information. Nanosensor technology provides a means to preserve a cell and study it over time within the entire cell system."
    The ability to work with living cells opens a new path to obtaining basic information critical to understanding the cell's molecular processes. Researchers have a new tool for understanding how toxic agents are transported into cells and how biological pathogens trigger biological responses in the cell.
    Vo-Dinh's team recently detected the biochemical components of a cell-signaling pathway, apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key process in an organism's ability to prevent disease such as cancer. This programmed cell-death mechanism causes cells to self-destruct before they can multiply and introduce disease to the organism.
    "When a cell in our body receives insults such as toxins or inflammation and is damaged, it kills itself. This is nature's way to limit and stop propagation of many diseases such as cancer," said Vo-Dinh. "For the first time we've seen apoptosis occur within a single living cell."
    Apoptosis triggers a host of tell-tale enzyme called caspases. Vo-Dinh's team introduced a light-activated anti-cancer drug into cancer cells. They then inserted the fiberoptic nanoprobe with a biomarker specific for caspase-9 attached to its tip. The presence of caspase-9 caused cleavage of the biomarker from the tip of the nanobiosensor. Changes in the intensity of the biomarker's fluorescence revealed that the light-activated anti-cancer drug had triggered the cell-death machinery.
    "The nanobiosensor has many other applications for looking at how cells react when they are treated with a drug or invaded by a biological pathogen. This has important implications ranging from drug therapy development to national security, environmental protection and a better understanding of molecular biology at a systems level," said Vo-Dinh. "This area of research is truly at the nexus of nanotechnology, biology and information technology."
    The research was supported by ORNL's laboratory-directed research and development program and by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy.
    ###
    NOTE TO EDITORS:
    You may read other press releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory or learn more about the lab at http://www.ornl.gov/news.
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    News Release
    Media Contact: Bill CabageCommunications and External Relations865.574.4399 ORNL’s nanobiosensor technology gives new access to living cell’s molecular processes
         This image shows a nanoprobe, with a tip 1,000 times finer than a human hair, penetrating a cell. The probe can enter, perform a measurement in situ and be withdrawn without destroying the cell. The nanobiosensor technology provides researchers who study cell systems at the molecular level a valuable tool for monitoring the health of a single cell. OAK RIDGE, Tenn., April 27, 2004 — Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a nanoscale technology for investigating biomolecular processes in single living cells. The new technology enables researchers to monitor and study cellular signaling networks, including the first observation of programmed cell death in a single live cell.
    The "nanobiosensor" allows scientists to physically probe inside a living cell without destroying it. As scientists adopt a systems approach to studying biomolecular processes, the nanobiosensor provides a valuable tool for intracellular studies that have applications ranging from medicine to national security to energy production.
    ORNL Corporate Fellow and Life Sciences Division researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh leads a team of researchers who are developing the nanoscale technology. "This research illustrates the integrated ‘nano-bio-info' approach to investigating and understanding these complex cell systems," Vo-Dinh said. "There is a need to explore uncharted territory inside a live cell and analyze the molecular processes. This minimally invasive nanotechnology opens the door to explore the inner world of single cells".
    ORNL's work was most recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and has appeared in a feature article of the journal Nature. Members of Vo-Dinh's research team include postdoctoral researchers Paul M. Kasili, Joon Myong Song and research staff biochemist Guy Griffin.
    The group's nanobiosensor is a tiny fiber-optic probe that has been drawn to a tip of only 40 nanometers (nm) across—a billionth of a meter and 1,000 times smaller than a human hair. The probe is small enough to be inserted into a cell.
    Immobilized at the nanotip is a bioreceptor molecule, such as an antibody, DNA or enzyme that can bind to target molecules of interest inside the cell. Video microscopy experiments reveal the minimally invasive nature of the nanoprobe in that it can be inserted into a cell and withdrawn without destroying it.
    Because the 40-nm diameter of the fiber-optic probe is much narrower than the 400-nm wavelength of light, only target molecules bound to the bioreceptors at the tip are exposed to and excited by the evanescent field of a laser signal.
    "We detect only the molecules that we target, without all the other background ‘noise' from the myriad other species inside the cell. Only nanoscale fiber-optics technology can provide this capability," said Vo-Dinh.
    ORNL's technology gives molecular biologists an important systems biology approach of studying complex systems through the nano-bio-info route. Conventional analytical methods—electron microscopy or introducing dyes, for example—have the disadvantage of being lethal to the cell.
    "The information obtained from conventional measurements is an average of thousands or millions of cells," said Vo-Dinh. "When you destroy cells to study them, you can't obtain the dynamic information from the whole live cell system. You get only pieces of information. Nanosensor technology provides a means to preserve a cell and study it over time within the entire cell system."
    The ability to work with living cells opens a new path to obtaining basic information critical to understanding the cell's molecular processes. Researchers have a new tool for understanding how toxic agents are transported into cells and how biological pathogens trigger biological responses in the cell.
    Vo-Dinh's team recently detected the biochemical components of a cell-signaling pathway, apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key process in an organism's ability to prevent disease such as cancer. This programmed cell-death mechanism causes cells to self-destruct before they can multiply and introduce disease to the organism.
    "When a cell in our body receives insults such as toxins or inflammation and is damaged, it kills itself. This is nature's way to limit and stop propagation of many diseases such as cancer," said Vo-Dinh. "For the first time we've seen apoptosis occur within a single living cell."
    Apoptosis triggers a host of tell-tale enzyme called caspases. Vo-Dinh's team introduced a light-activated anti-cancer drug into cancer cells. They then inserted the fiberoptic nanoprobe with a biomarker specific for caspase-9 attached to its tip. The presence of caspase-9 caused cleavage of the biomarker from the tip of the nanobiosensor. Changes in the intensity of the biomarker's fluorescence revealed that the light-activated anti-cancer drug had triggered the cell-death machinery.
    "The nanobiosensor has many other applications for looking at how cells react when they are treated with a drug or invaded by a biological pathogen. This has important implications ranging from drug therapy development to national security, environmental protection and a better understanding of molecular biology at a systems level," said Vo-Dinh. "This area of research is truly at the nexus of nanotechnology, biology and information technology."
    The research was supported by ORNL's laboratory-directed research and development program and by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy.
  • We are designing and fabricating an electromechanical device for manipulation and electrical probing of nano-scale objects (Figures 1 and 2). The device consists of micro-scale flexures and actuators that generate nano-scale motion; and nano-scale structure that interact with the nano world. Our device is designed to work in conjunction with the AFM and will be used to image the sample as well.
    Currently there is no versatile, practical experimental tool for use at this scale. Our goal is to have a cheap and consistently reproducible experimental device. Hence, we are designing this device to be completely batch fabricated start to finish. Despite the lack of batch lithography at this scale, we have developed unique processes that allow for nano-scale feature size and single nano-scale pitch using standard microfabrication.
    To ensure consistency between our nano-tweezers, we have developed self compensating devices that can withstand a range of process and subsequent structure variations and still provide the same performance characteristics. This robust design method also has extensive utility in other commercial MEMs applications where repeatability of performance and reliability are essential.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Metrology (from Greek 'metron' (measure), and -logy) is the science of measurement. Metrology includes all theoretical and practical aspects of measurement.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Metrology (from Greek 'metron' (measure), and -logy) is the science of measurement. Metrology includes all theoretical and practical aspects of measurement.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • The most important thing to understand about Whyville really, is that it’s a place full of kids. It’s a virtual city that belongs to the kids who come from all over the world to have fun. The kids consider this their own town, and they call themselves Whyvillians.
    To become a Whyvillian, you create a Whyville persona. In this screen, and every other screen you’ve already seen, for example, each face is a Whyville citizen. To become a Whyville citizen, you create a persona, the most important aspect of which is your face.
    You can see here that the faces are varied and very creative. Here’s an amoeba. Here’s someone driving a car. Here is someone wearing a style known as ‘Goth’. The ungliest citizens you see around are in fact us, the city workers.
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Norway icpti workshop_v1.1_long

    1. 1. The Future is Here
    2. 2. The Future is Here
    3. 3. “In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation technicians start at $30,000 per year at American Eagle.” –Harley Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    4. 4. Jobs Context
    5. 5. http://www.afmc.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/060307-F-2383G-006.JPG “We’ve had a huge turn over. Most of the guys who hired into Bell as machinists came in the 1960’s.” The average age of machinists is 44. –Chuck Marbut, Bell Helicopter
    6. 6. “Within ten years more than 50% of our employees will be over 55.” Edward C. Trump Plant Manager Entergy
    7. 7. “90 percent of our expertise is 40 and
    8. 8. “We are losing our capacity to make tools.” –Jimmy Dye, Pres., R.E. Dye, TSTC West TX
    9. 9. 20 teenagers in 9th grade • 6 will not graduate HS • 6 will go directly to work • 8 will go to college • 4 will dropout of college • 4 will graduate college • 2 will gain high skill employment • 2 will be underemployed Gray and Herr
    10. 10. From To What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    11. 11. High School Dropouts High School Graduates What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    12. 12. High School Graduates College Graduates What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    13. 13. Low STEM Performance High STEM Performance What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    14. 14. The Future is Here! Discussion
    15. 15. From To What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    16. 16. The Future is Here Science and Technology Workforce Education
    17. 17. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense ‘intuitive linear’ view. So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century -- it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today's rate)… because we're doubling the rate of progress every decade, we'll see a century of progress--at today's rate--in only 25 calendar years.” Kurzweil, KurzweilAI.net, March 7, 2001.
    18. 18. If you have an automobile made in the past 5 years, you are driving a vehicle with more computing power than was used to put man on the moon… Cars are intelligent machines integrating mechanical, computer, electronic and control systems. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
    19. 19. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
    20. 20. PRIUS+ team: we built the first PRIUS+ conversion Sept 11-22, 2004, starting with a low-cost lead-acid battery pack. Pictured are (L-R) Ron Gremban, Felix Kramer, Marc Geller, Kevin Lyons, Andrew Lawton. See About CalCars for names of those who helped but are not pictured.
    21. 21. http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
    22. 22. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/ Running Shoe?
    23. 23. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1- wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp • 1,000th of a second sensor measures gap between heel and a magnet • 20-MHz microcontroller measures changes in compression • Motor spins at 4000 rpm turns a screw loosens cable • Environmentally and operator adaptive shoe sole Wearable Robot
    24. 24. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp Berkeley Motes/berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ 6 Pack for $120 on the web from xbow.com
    25. 25. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp /berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ Intel/Berkeley Connexus www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley Motes New H2H Relations
    26. 26. v v Think beyond traditional notion of robotics…
    27. 27. Mechatronics Functional integration of mechanical, electronic, computer and control systems. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    28. 28. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
    29. 29. MIT Technology Review, January, 2005
    30. 30. http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif Lab-in-a-Pill
    31. 31. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_capsule_endoscopy Capsule Endoscope
    32. 32. Source: The Guardian Date: 2 May 2002 State University of New York (Suny)
    33. 33. https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg Bio Mechatronics
    34. 34. Nanoprobe, with a tip 1,000 times finer than a human hair, penetrating a cell. The probe can enter, perform a measurement in situ and be withdrawn without destroying the cell. http://www.ornl.gov/info/press_releases/get_press_release.cfm?ReleaseNumber=mr20040714-00 Opto-Mechatronics
    35. 35. http://web.mit.edu/nanoengineering/research/microfab.shtml Micro-Mechatronics
    36. 36. An artificial red cell – the respirocyte [41]. Designer Robert A. Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest Bishop. http://www.imminst.org/freitas.html “A half a liter of respirocytes… would allow a person to hold his breath at the bottom of a swimming pool for up to 4 hours…”
    37. 37. Computers Mechatronics What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    38. 38. Mechatronics Functional integration of mechanical, electronic, computer and control systems. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    39. 39. Mechatronics-related Industries • Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment • Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical • Telecommunications & Information Services • Distribution, Transportation & Logistics • Heavy & Special Trade Construction • Energy, Mining & Related Support Services • Petroleum Refining & Chemical • Transportation Equipment • Production Support & Industrial Machinery • Agriculture, Forestry & Food • Aerospace and Aviation • Homeland Security & Defense
    40. 40. SET Convergence DNA Chip
    41. 41. IT Revolution SET Convergence What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    42. 42. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO
    43. 43. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO S&T Convergence
    44. 44. Technical applications of biological molecules including protein-based materials, DNA-based materials, biomineralization, cellular systems and bioelectronics. http://www.nanobionics3.de/ NanoBionics
    45. 45. NanoBionic Actuators Tethered bacterium Swimming bacterium Swimming speed ~ 20-30 µm Protons flux/motor ~ 1200 proton/rev Tethered bacterium Motor efficiency ~ 90-100 % Output power ~ 2.9×10-4 pW Stall torque ~ 4600 pN-nm  Nano-motor (45 nm wide) Genetic Engineering Harmless E. coli Mohamed Al-Fandi, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor of NEMS & MEMS Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Biomechanics University of Texas
    46. 46. Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): Business Week: 10.11.2004 100 million jobs are going to be created in a lot of these cross-disciplinary fields Council on Competitiveness: National Innovation Initiative
    47. 47. The Future is Here! Discussion
    48. 48. From To What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    49. 49. What are the implications of computers and robotic interfaces to the human body and brain?
    50. 50. By routing signals from helmet-mounted cameras, sonar and other equipment through the tongue to the brain, they hope to give elite soldiers superhuman senses similar to owls, snakes and fish…. Researchers at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition envision their work giving Army Rangers 360-degree unobstructed vision at night and allowing Navy SEALs to sense sonar in their heads while maintaining normal vision underwater -- turning sci-fi into reality. Brain Port: Warriors of the future will 'taste' battlefield CNN - Tuesday, April 25, 2006; Posted: 11:23 a.m. EDT (15:23 GMT) New Relation of Humans and Machines
    51. 51. Critical Analysis http://heaven4d.babu.com/CG/
    52. 52. Source: DOD C2 Research Program, 2004 Evolution of the division of labor between Humans and Machines: Emergence of Human Machine Cooperation (HMC)
    53. 53. The Future is Here Science and Technology Workforce Education
    54. 54. “Over the next ten years, 26 of the top 30 fastest growing jobs will require some post- secondary education or training...The demand for skilled workers is outpacing supply, resulting in attractive, high-paying jobs going unfilled.” Emily Stover De Rocco Assistant Secretary of Labor for Education and Training
    55. 55. “Over the next ten years, 26 of the top 30 fastest growing jobs will require some post- secondary education or training...The demand for skilled workers is outpacing supply, resulting in attractive, high-paying jobs going unfilled.” Emily Stover De Rocco Assistant Secretary of Labor for Education and Training
    56. 56. Source: Competition in a global economy. The Career Cluster Solution. Debra Mills, CORD White Collar 20% Blue Collar 80% 1950’s Workforce Model
    57. 57. GM05-018 L3IS/DFOISR-60 “Our requirement for skilled labor is up while our requirement for unskilled labor is down.” --Lance Martin, Manager for Public Relations
    58. 58. Unskilled Workforce Skilled Workforce What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    59. 59. The number of jobs requiring technical training is growing at five times the rate of other occupations. Innovate America, U.S. Council on Competitiveness
    60. 60. Wind Turbine Tech 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr.
    61. 61. “Turbine Techs earn $28- $40K a year… Many techs earning $40K - $80K a year with OT.” – Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    62. 62. “….we had to upgrade our basic mechanic skills to include programmable logic controllers and electrical systems.” --Dr. Ron Lentsch, Allergan 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    63. 63. Meterology Technician $44,000-to-$56,000 Production Set-up Technician $30,000-to-$50,000 Mechanics $36,000-to-$56,000 Allergan 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    64. 64. Breckenridge, Texas TSTC Emerging Technologies Interview Blood Chemistry Analyzer
    65. 65. “We need people who have integrated skills related to mechanical, electronic, hydraulics and pneumatics.” --Bill Biffinger, HR, Superior Essex TSTC West TX
    66. 66. “Starting wages for Engineering Tech, IT Tech and Industrial Technology range from $28K to $32K.” -- Bill Biffinger, HR, Superior Essex TSTC West TX
    67. 67. System and Network Technician $30,000-to-$50,000 “You have to be able to trouble shoot in a different way. In the mechanical world, you are looking at equipment and finding specific things to troubleshoot. Now it’s all software and abstract thought is important.” --Freida Jackson, Systems Editor, Waco Tribune-Herald 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    68. 68. “It used to be the sledgehammer mechanic. These days, the technology has advanced so much that our most important tool is our brain. It is more of a thinking man’s game now.” Jeff Nelson Service Manager CAT
    69. 69. Avionic Tech $36,000-to-$65,000 Avionics Mechanics $28,000-to-$55,000 Lab Technician $25,000-to-$40,000 ACTI 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    70. 70. Free Flight Repair Technicians $28,000-to-$40,000+ 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    71. 71. Entry-Level R&D Tech $40,000-to-$50,000 4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
    72. 72. “We are looking for someone who can look at the mechanical, the electrical and the control and understand these systems. We need people who are capable of crossing over between these various areas.” Don Sheffield Senior Recruiter GlobalSantaFe TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    73. 73. “In this plant, in the next three years we will need nine Instrumentation and Numerical Control (INC) technicians.” Edward C. Trump Plant Manager Entergy 4/2007, TSTC Marshall
    74. 74. Specialized KSA Systems KSA What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    75. 75. Mechatronics Functional integration of mechanical, electronic, computer and control systems. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    76. 76. [Navy Mechatronic Job Tasks]
    77. 77. JOB MERGERS
    78. 78. STEM jobs are increasingly transdisciplinary--integrating knowledge, skills and occupations from traditionally separate fields of work and academic study.
    79. 79. The Future is Here! Discussion
    80. 80. STEM jobs are increasingly transdisciplinary--integrating knowledge, skills and occupations from traditionally separate fields of work and academic study.
    81. 81. The Future is Here Science and Technology Workforce Education
    82. 82. spaceTEAMS v1.0
    83. 83. Elementary spaceTEAMS Source: Andrew Schuetze, EISD San Antonio,TX
    84. 84. Middle School Source: Botball.org spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX
    85. 85. US First-EISD San Antonio,TX High School Source: Andrew Schuetze, EISD
    86. 86. Mechatronics Functional integration of mechanical, electronic, computer and control systems. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    87. 87. Mechatronics-related Industries • Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment • Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical • Telecommunications & Information Services • Distribution, Transportation & Logistics • Heavy & Special Trade Construction • Energy, Mining & Related Support Services • Petroleum Refining & Chemical • Transportation Equipment • Production Support & Industrial Machinery • Agriculture, Forestry & Food • Aerospace and Aviation • Homeland Security & Defense
    88. 88. Computers Mechatronics What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    89. 89. Willard R. Daggett, Ed.D., President of the International Center for Leadership in Education Academics ARTSCTE America’s Top Performing Schools
    90. 90. Lower Rio Grande Valley o College transition rates, all students: 56.7% o College transition rates, Tech Prep (2005 cohort): 65.7% State of Texas o College transition rates, all students: 55.3% o College transition rates (2005 cohort): Tech Prep: 55.6% Source: High School College Linkages, THECB Fall 2006 Preliminary Enrollment, (2005-2006 Data), in Patricia G. (Pat) Bubb 18% Increase in College Attendance
    91. 91. STEM TEAMS What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    92. 92. High School Dropouts High School Graduates What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    93. 93. Low STEM Performance High STEM Performance What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    94. 94. The Experience
    95. 95. Space Teams, ACCD
    96. 96. Space Teams, ACCD
    97. 97. Space Teams, ACCD
    98. 98. Space Teams, ACCD
    99. 99. Specialized KSA Systems KSA What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    100. 100. Program Elements
    101. 101. Gameboy BRAIN Vision System Lego Actuators and Building Blocks Source: Charmedlabs.com
    102. 102. Population: 1.4MM Growth: 1200/day Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes EA online games 9 minutes AOL Entertainment 10 minutes Whyville.net 59 minutes Yahoo! Games 78 minutes MEAN TIME PER USER LOGIN Discovery.com: 96 million Whyville.net: 58.4 million BigChalk: 11 million Time for Kids: 8 million New York Times Learning Net: 1.2 million Cosmogirl: 425,000 PAGE VIEWS ©numedeon,inc.2003 The average time per log in July was 3.8 hours making it second to Neopets.
    103. 103. ©numedeon,inc.2004
    104. 104. ©numedeon,inc.2004 SPACE STATION
    105. 105. spaceTEAMS v2.0
    106. 106. Jim Brazell Consulting Analyst, IC2 Institute, UT Austin and Texas State Technical College System
    107. 107. Qwerk: The Next Gen Robot Platform • ARM9 Processor • 32 Mbytes SDRAM, 16 Mbytes flash • Spartan 3E FPGA • 2 USB 2.0 ports • WiFi and webcam support • 4-axis back-emf motor controller • 16 RC-servo controllers • 8 12-bit analog inputs • Audio amplifier / speaker output • 30W switching power supply • $120 BOM (quantity 100) www.charmedlabs.com
    108. 108. www.charmedlabs.com
    109. 109. STEMATICS – Curriculum Metrology – Measurement of nano, meso, micro and macro-scale systems. Materials – Electronic, thermal, magnetic, chemical, structural and optical properties of materials. Control Systems - Behavior of dynamical systems. Mechanical Systems – Structures, mechanisms and machines. Electronic Systems – Electronic circuits, components and devices. Technology, Career and Academic Exploration - Workforce, industry and emerging technology trends presented in the context of life, career and academic planning.
    110. 110. STEMATICS – Method
    111. 111. ©numedeon,inc.2004
    112. 112. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO S&T Convergence
    113. 113. IT Revolution SET Convergence What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
    114. 114. spaceTEAMS v3.0
    115. 115. Online network, simulation games and instrumentation trainers (?)
    116. 116. Improved Target Acquisition System Trainer
    117. 117. STEMATICS
    118. 118. The Future is Here Science and Technology Workforce Education
    119. 119. “In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation technicians start at $30,000 per year at American Eagle.” –Harley Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    120. 120. Commercialization Joint R&D Technopolis and Culture of Innovation What is missing?
    121. 121. Commercialization Joint R&D K-12 Pipeline Technopolis and Culture of Innovation
    122. 122. Commercialization Joint R&D What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students? Commercialization Joint R&D and K-12 Pipeline
    123. 123. DaVinci Minds http://www.philisoft.com/personal/misc/davinci/davinci-1600x1200.jpg
    124. 124. spaceTEAMS is the human platform for mars and beyond…
    125. 125. Jim Brazell Consulting Analyst, IC2 Institute, UT Austin and Texas State Technical College System jim@ventureramp.com

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